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Got hit by a truck...

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by mbpautz762, Sep 13, 2008.

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  1. mbpautz762

    mbpautz762 Member

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    ...Or at least it feels like I did :cuss:

    I bought my first ever shotgun, a Mossberg 590A1, and shot it for the first time yesterday. Stupid me decided to start off by shooting about 50 rounds of 3" magnum buckshot and 3" slugs. Now my shoulder is battered, bruised, and slightly swollen :what:

    Since I'm new to shotguns, is this what normally happens when shooting these loads, or am I doing something wrong? This may sound really stupid, but is there a special way to hold a shotgun to reduce bruising? Or should I just limit myself to weaker shells next time? A friend said it shouldn't recoil any more than a Mosin Nagant M44, which I can comfortably shoot all day long. Thanks for putting up with my newb-ness, just wanted to see what you all thought ;)
     
  2. bejay

    bejay Member

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    really is normal should use lighter loads when just target shooting if you are gonna shoot that many rounds.
    would say about any 3 inch shotgun shell is likely to have more recoil than a mosin
     
  3. KC0QGL

    KC0QGL Member

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    Invest in a recoil pad or use 2 3/4 shells.
     
  4. scott22

    scott22 Member

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    Nope thats sounds normal. 3" Magnum slug loads definately feel a lot harder hitting than my M44 shooting either Bulg Heavy Ball or Czech light ball.
     
  5. macadore

    macadore Member

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    Yep. You can get an aftermarket sock that absorbs recoil or get another shotgun like Benilli which comes with a stock that absorbs recoil. However, if you’re shooting for fun rather then hunting or self defense, shoot lighter loads. They’re cheaper and much less abusive.
     
  6. mbpautz762

    mbpautz762 Member

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    Thanks guys....I was worried I just wasn't shouldering it correctly. I guess my friend is having a nice little laugh over this one....:neener:
     
  7. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    I actually find the kick to be comparable between the M44's and 3"magnum 12ga.

    It's the steel buttplate on the mosin that gets me. Rubber recoil pads (like on my 870) are a good idea. I'm gonna find the gentleman that invented them and by him a drink.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2008
  8. Defensory

    Defensory Member

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    2 3/4" shells are quite sufficient for both target shooting and self-defense, and noticeably easier on your body. If you use the shotgun for those two purposes, there's really no reason to fire 3" magnums. More expensive, more recoil and more aches and pains.
     
  9. rodregier

    rodregier Member

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    Similar to some of the other contributors, to reduce shotgun recoil I use:

    - light 2 3/4" loads
    - good recoil pads
    - clothing-based recoil shield (made of sorbothane)

    when shooting shotgun

    A good term to remember is "recoil fatigue".
     
  10. hatchetbearer

    hatchetbearer Member

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    I'd suggest not getting one of the ultra light "tactical" 6 position stocks too. weighs less and the buttplate on those will just add to the recoil. definitely get some lighter loads for target shooting.

    Or just man up and take the pain:p
     
  11. 357wheelgunner

    357wheelgunner Member

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    Keep your solid stock.

    You need to take a class to learn how to properly mount, steady, and shoot the shotgun.

    Use low recoil buckshot and slug. 3" loads don't gain much, in my opinion, over standard or low recoil loads. The rounds you shot are the reason so many people don't like to shoot shotguns.

    Enjoy your shotgun!
     
  12. Dave McCracken

    Dave McCracken Moderator In Memoriam

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    2 3/4" loads holding 1 oz or 7/8 oz of shot work very well for targets, birds and familiarization.

    Once your form and technique have jelled the 3" stuff will be tolerable.
     
  13. dagger dog

    dagger dog Member

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    That is the facts of life shooting that many rounds of 12 3"magnum ammo.

    I have a switch bbl Winchester 12 ga pump, 26" smooth, and 21" rifled, for deer. Man it kicked the living s@#t outta me zeroing the scope with sabot slugs. Was black blue and green for a week. I only shot 15 rounds to get the thing to hit where I wanted.

    You must have a sadomasochistic gene in your family history:what:
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2008
  14. BADUNAME37

    BADUNAME37 Member

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    12 gauge double barrel fired nearly simultaneously by accident

    I have an over/under Weatherby Orion 12 gauge that shoots only 2 3/4" (not chambered for 3"). This gun has a single trigger that you pull twice in succession to shoot the upper/lower barrels.

    Several years ago, I shot a couple of real low brass at some crows flying over.

    It didn't seem too bad at all, so I loaded up two 2 3/4" magnum shells and called more crows in.

    A crow flew over and was almost directly overhead. I pointed the gun, pulled the trigger and KABOOM! The gun nearly knocked me on my rear (causing me to almost lose my balance and nearly fall)!:confused:

    I opened it and both empty shell casings flew out!:eek:

    I thought to myself that this thing just fired both barrels at once, how could that be?:what:

    :scrutiny:When thinking more about it and duplicating the way I was leaning way back (almost off-balance already), when I pulled the trigger to shoot the crow, the gun fired, causing it to recoil, and when the gun was moving forward after the initial recoil, the weight of my right hand (and right arm) caused the trigger finger to pull the trigger a second time.

    So, basically, the shotgun was just letting up from the first recoil when I inadvertantly fired it the second time! It didn't sound like two big booms, but rather one big boom - the shots were fired NEARLY SIMULTANEOUSLY (ouch)!:(

    After that, I realized I don't want to be aiming overhead in an unsteady manner with magnum loads. :uhoh: Also, I need to be certain my trigger hand is tightly holding the stock, so only my trigger finger is working the trigger (and not any weight from my hand/arm).

    Both my shoulder and my lower back hurt for several days after that incident (mostly, my lower back from the awkward twisting motion that occurred).

    Yes, I did drop the crow that was at treetop level. It landed about 20' from where I was standing.:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2008
  15. Coreyf983

    Coreyf983 Member

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    Yup just like everyone else said, drop your load size down. I tried shooting geese with 3 1/2 magnums and its just not worth the poor shot that I get anticipating the hurt haha.
     
  16. green country shooter

    green country shooter Member

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    The 590 is a pump, right? There's a shotgun trainer that teaches pushing forward with the support hand when you shoot to lessen recoil.

    A recoil pad and lighter loads is also a good answer. You can get loads as light as 7/8 ounce in 12 gauge. Look at the store for anything labeled "light target load." Some makers give a feet per second number, some give you a "dram equivalent" number. Pay attention to these as you buy and shoot and soon you will know what they mean.
     
  17. sargenv

    sargenv Member

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    One of the better wearable recoil pads I've picked up is made by "Past". It's pretty easy on and off and allows you to wear it under a jacket if need be. The Magnum pad goes up and over your shoulder a bit so that you can use it for shooting Prone.

    Magnum shotshells are just that, more powder (slower burning), more shot ususally, but velocity stays about the same, recoil also goes up considerably. 50 rounds of buck and slug is an awful lot. I usually shoot a few and call it quits. In the case of slugs, they are moving anywhere from 1500 fps (2 3/4") to 1650 fps (3") and can weigh from 1 ounce up to 1.25 ounces. It doesn't take a genius to figure out that they hurt on both ends ;)
     
  18. farscott

    farscott Member

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    In addition to lighter loads, your shotgun should properly fit you. If you have to stretch too much to reach the trigger or the forend, battering can result. Personally I need a shorter length of pull than most people do, especially when I am wearing a sweater or coat.

    Some may not agree, but I have found the Knoxx Specops stock with the adjustable LOP and a recoil absorber a shoulder saver.
     
  19. mgregg85

    mgregg85 Member

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    Thats a great way to start actually, everything else will now be much easier. Just don't let yourself develop a flinch because of it. Gotta learn to love that recoil, and remember its much worse on the other end of the gun.
     
  20. Dollar An Hour

    Dollar An Hour Member

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    I started out learning my 870 with 2-3/4" with 7/8 oz birdshot to get the idea. Then moved up to some low-recoil Fiocchi 00 buck and it wasn't as bad as I thought it'd be. I was little sore the next day, but I think Remington's R3 recoil pad is a nice design.
     
  21. BADUNAME37

    BADUNAME37 Member

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    Choate Adjustible Stock

    This thread reminds me of when I bought my Mossberg 500 with pistol grips. I ended up putting the Pachmayr Vindicator kit in.

    Stupid me, I go out first thing with 3" magnums and the gun nearly took my teeth out from the recoil - even though I was holding it real tight!:eek:

    After shooting it with a pistol grip for a while, I figured it was completely useless for my needs, so I left the Pachmayr forend grip, which is nice rubber and took the pistol grip off and put on a synthetic Choate Stock like this:
    [​IMG]
    From http://www.choatestocks.com/Shotgun.html

    I like it a lot. In the summer, with a T-shirt, I have more spacers. In the winter with heavy clothing, I take the spacers out. They give you various thickness spacers and various length screws to hold the spacers between the stock butt and the recoil pad. The spacers have an indentation, so each fits into one another and into the stock without any slippage.
     
  22. jackdanson

    jackdanson Member

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    I use cheapo walmart target loads when shooting "just for fun" and they shoot a lot lighter than the buckshot does.
     
  23. FFMedic

    FFMedic Member

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    Knoxx is your friend if you like 3" shells. The Spec-Ops stock and Breachers grip are not gimicks at all, they work wonderful!

    FFMedic
     
  24. Mainsail

    Mainsail Member

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    I'll add my vote for the Knoxx. My 100# kid shoots full power 2¾" shells without drama.
    0cc2ad6d-e6b2-4fa7-85fd-8e669f7bc0d6.jpg
     
  25. Meowhead

    Meowhead Member

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    There's a good trick to managing recoil: keep the buttstock an inch or so away from your shoulder when you fire, not actually touching. The distance is so that your gun can absorb some of the recoil impulse before it's transferred to your body.

    (don't actually do this)
     
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