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Hey Guys, Load Question...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by LJ-MosinFreak-Buck, Sep 11, 2013.

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  1. LJ-MosinFreak-Buck

    LJ-MosinFreak-Buck Member

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    Okay, a buddy of mine recently got some load ammo as a gift from a mutual friend, and being as cautious as we can be, we're bringing the question to people who are more knowledgable than we are on the topic.

    Caliber: .223 Remington
    Bullet Type: FMJ and SP (Hornady)
    Bullet Weight: 55gr.
    Charge Weight: 26.0gr.
    Primer Type: Tula Small Rifle

    I don't know who makes the powder, but the piece of paper with the load says 26.0 BL-C2. Cases have been annealed.

    Safe to fire from an AR?


    ~On The Road Again...~
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    BL-C(2) is Hodgdon powder.

    Load data from them shows 25.5 as a starting load with a 55 grain bullet.
    27.5 is Max.

    If you fully trust the guy who loaded them?
    They should be safe to fire.

    rc
     
  3. LJ-MosinFreak-Buck

    LJ-MosinFreak-Buck Member

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    I do. And my buddy does too. Thank you, a pretty big relief. Found some that weren't crimped properly, but he thinks the brass got too hot in the annealing and made the problem children soft. None of the others are showing anything bad otherwise. He's replacing the ones that have the crimp issue.


    ~On The Road Again...~
     
  4. Jesse Heywood

    Jesse Heywood Member

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    Just to be sure dismantle one and check the bullet weight and powder charge. For a few minutes work it is cheap insurance.
     
  5. dmazur

    dmazur Member

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    This is a very difficult process to do consistently if he wasn't using an annealing machine.

    IMO, it isn't a question of whether you trust him to load correctly. With brass of questionable strength, some of the cartridges may have case head separations and others will be perfectly fine.

    On the other hand, it isn't as dangerous as a double charge...which you apparently trust that he did not do.
     
  6. allaroundhunter

    allaroundhunter Member

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    The crimping really is not a big deal at all. I wouldn't even throw them out as they will work just as well as the others.

    What is the OAL of the rounds?
     
  7. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    You said you trust him and then soon after said some of the loads were not crimped correctly probably due to improper annealing. That fact would remove my trust in those rounds. If they were gifts say thank you but I would not fire them because the cases are probably compromised. If you paid for them I would return them for a refund and use the money to buy your own loading setup.
     
  8. horsemen61

    horsemen61 Member

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    I gotta agree with arch on this
     
  9. witchhunter

    witchhunter Member

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    Arch is right. Load yer own.
     
  10. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    I shot someone elses reloads many years ago, and they were about as predictable as a rattle snake. So if your asking me, it's a flat out no, I don't / won't shoot someone else's reloads. And I agree with other's here, in that, there are already some concerns regarding case integrity.

    GS
     
  11. IWAC

    IWAC Member

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    Two experiences in my past life keep me from ever using someone else's reloads.
    My brother in law just loved to pour 2400 into a 357 magnum case till it almost overflowed, crimp a Lyman 158 gr bullet on top and go shooting. Broad daylight, 3 foot fireball from the muzzle, bushes turning brown in front of him and small animals hopping around in circles, deafened! (Only slightly exaggerated!:D) Good thing he had a Ruger BlackhawK! The same load would have violently disassembled my Smith Model 19, had he loaned me some by mistake.

    The next one, I was shooting next to a friend's friend, who had worked up some "defense loads" for his 1911, using some brand of cast 45-70 bullet, which was some heavier, and a few thousandths larger than the bullets used in the 1911. "Experienced reloader", I was told.

    He shot, and I wondered where the ejected brass went, and then I heard a "plop" as it hit the ground next to me. The next one, I watched, and it went for the bleachers. Next one, he shot, I yelled "I got it!" waited a bit, stuck out my hand, and caught it. I noticed it had a nice little scoop blown out where the brass was unsupported over the feed throat. :what: A couple more, and I saw the recoil spring fly off the gun, and land about 6 feet in front of him. The barrel bushing lugs had been sheared off by the pressures generated by his load!
    Why didn't I run when I saw the first ejection? I was brand new to the shoting/ reloading world, and didn't realize what I was seeing!

    Sooo...don't trust NOBODY'S reloads,and be very suspicious of your own!;)
     
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