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How loud are high velocity .22lr?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Marlin60Man, Mar 19, 2012.

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  1. Marlin60Man

    Marlin60Man Member

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    Is there anyone knows the decibel levels of high velocity .22lr rounds out of a rifle barrel? I'm wondering if I should start wearing hearing protection?
     
  2. gathert

    gathert Member

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    You should always wear hearing protection. Its the repeated exposure to the shots that gets your hearing damaged. One or two you will be fine from a .22, but once the calibers get bigger your hearing can be damaged on the first shot.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I don't know how loud in decibels.

    But YES YOU SHOULD wear hearing protection!!

    WHAT DID YOU SAY??

    STOP SCREAMING AT YOU?
    STOP SCREWING WITH YOU?
    START HOPPING ON YOU?

    WHAT?

    rc
     
  4. allaroundhunter

    allaroundhunter Member

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    The only times that I do not use hearing pro is when I am out on the farm and have to shoot a snake, wild dog, or something else and don't have time to put it in.

    Even when I shoot my .22's I use ear plugs or muffs (using High Velocity or Stingers)
     
  5. Marlin60Man

    Marlin60Man Member

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    All right, I was told by someone recently that .22s were not loud enough even with sustained shots, but saw an article in hearing-loss magazine that had a table of various rounds and I think it said? .22. were 90-100 dB and I know that is too high to be sustained...
     
  6. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    varies with barrel length and exact load
    you should have never done that without hearing protection
    don't even listen to that person again.
    did they SHOUT it to you because they were going deaf for "some reason"?

    ...

    Seriously, you're damaging your hearing with every impulse from every shot, at least get some plugs, plugs and muffs are better for extended sessions.
    I'm an industrial worker in a high-noise field, I know what I'm talking about and anything but the poofter CB loads is plenty to cause permanent hearing damage.
     
  7. allaroundhunter

    allaroundhunter Member

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    ......you know the thread about the biggest lie a gun dealer has ever told you?......yea.....
     
  8. Marlin60Man

    Marlin60Man Member

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    Not to offend anyone, but I was really interested in finding an actual dB level, anyone know where to find it?

    I was a machinist and am already deaf in my left ear, so I kinda had a whim to check for sure when I got to playing with a dB meter app on my cell phone. Haven't had a chance to use it, nor do I trust its accuracy...

    I guess better safe than sorry though :D
     
  9. kozak6

    kozak6 Member

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    A quick google suggests that a .22 lr rifle is around 145 dB, although this will vary somewhat depending on load and barrel length.

    At any rate, it's enough to cause hearing damage.

    Much like with anything else, you are ultimately better off using protection even though it can get in the way.
     
  10. Marlin60Man

    Marlin60Man Member

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    Yeah, for sure. I couldn't find much but a video suggesting they were 84 dB and that didn't seem right to me.

    I really need to invest in a good pair of shooting glasses too. I try to use the over-the-glasses ones, but sometimes they just get so foggy I get frustrated and take them off. :/

    Anyway, yikes, 145 is way higher than I thought.
     
  11. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

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    As several have said, that "someone" is flat out wrong - period

    A .22LR is considerably louder than 85 to 100 dB. That level can be reached in a crowded restaurant. It's more in the 140 to 155 dB range.

    See Zak Smith's post #9 here: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=642083
     
  12. joe normal

    joe normal Member

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    The hard part is having measurement equipment that is 'fast' enough to capture that initial transient impulse. I work with high end pro audio, and would be worried about reference Mic diaphragm damage with anything more than a .22 at close range.

    Plugs and muffs are your friends.
     
  13. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    Get a good set of prescription shooting glasses with flat earpieces, so they don't interfere with muffs.

    It will cost less than you fear and be totally worth it.
     
  14. Shawnpatrick

    Shawnpatrick Member

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  15. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Trust me. Shooting 22LR's from a rifle can cause deteriation of your hearing. You can get by for a while, but you WILL suffer loss of hearing, usually at the high frequency end of the sound range. It is simply NOT worth the risk. Wear at least ear plugs which is what I do when shooting 22 rifles unless I'm at the range. In which case, I wear ear muffs.
     
  16. Furncliff

    Furncliff Member

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    Gunfire Sound Levels

    Gunfire Noise Level Reference Chart
    Below we have listed critical data describing peak sound pressure levels produced by firearms used in shooting and hunting sports. A serious byproduct of this exposure is sensory-neural hearing loss, which cannot be restored to normal. With the introduction of MUZZLE BRAKES and PORTING, the risks of hearing loss dramatically increase. Use this chart as a reference guide for promoting the need of using adequate hearing protection.

    Notations
    Keep in mind that conversational speech is approximately 60-65 dB, and the threshold of pain is considered to be 140 dB. According to Dr. William Clark, Ph.D. senior research scientist in charge of the NOISE LABORATORY at the Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, the damage caused by one shot from a .357 magnum pistol, which can expose a shooter to 165 dB for 2msec, is equivalent to over 40 hours in a noisy workplace. Dr. Krammer, Ph.D., Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana has documented the following pressure levels.

    Table 1. SHOTGUN NOISE DATA (DECIBEL AVERAGES)

    .410 Bore 28" barrel 150dB
    26" barrel 150.25dB
    18 _" barrel 156.30dB
    20 Gauge 28" barrel 152.50dB
    22" barrel 154.75dB
    12 Gauge 28" barrel 151.50dB
    26" barrel 156.10dB
    18 _" barrel 161.50dB


    Dr. Krammer continues to say that shotgun noise averaged slightly more that 150dB. This is approximately 14dB beyond the threshold of pain, and more than sufficient to cause sudden hearing loss with complications.

    Table 2. CENTERFIRE RIFLE DATA

    .223, 55GR. Commercial load 18 _" barrel 155.5dB
    .243 in 22" barrel 155.9dB
    .30-30 in 20" barrel 156.0dB
    7mm Magnum in 20" barrel 157.5dB
    .308 in 24" barrel 156.2dB
    .30-06 in 24" barrel 158.5dB
    .30-06 in 18 _" barrel 163.2dB
    .375 — 18" barrel with muzzle brake 170 dB
    Krammer adds that sound pressure levels for the various pistols and ammunition tested yielded an average mean of 157.5 dB, which is greater than those previously shown for shotgun and rifle noise levels. There was also a greater range, from 152.4dB to 164.5dB, representing 12 dB difference, or more than 10 time as much acoustic energy for the top end of the pistol spectrum. It should be noticed that this figure of 164.5 dB approaches the practical limit of impulse noise measurement capability inherent in most modern sound level meters.

    Table 3. CENTERFIRE PISTOL DATA

    .25 ACP 155.0 dB
    .32 LONG 152.4 dB
    .32 ACP 153.5 dB
    .380 157.7 dB
    9mm 159.8 dB
    .38 S&W 153.5 dB
    .38 Spl 156.3 dB
    .357 Magnum 164.3 dB
    .41 Magnum 163.2 dB
    .44 Spl 155.9 dB
    .45 ACP 157.0 dB
    .45 COLT 154.7 dB
    The above averages are for all types of ammunition used in these firearms, and should be considered fairly representative. No wonder we hear numerous reports about hearing loss as a result of firearms including acoustic traumas that take hearing completely as a result of one shot. Imagine what the noise levels must be when we incorporate muzzle brakes or porting into firearms, or have a gun explode near the ear due to malfunction.

    OUR WARNING IS SIMPLE AND IS IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF EACH SHOOTER. AS THE SOUND PRESSURES INCREASE, SO DOES THE RISK OF PERMANENT HEARING LOSS. IF YOU INCORPORATE A PROCEDURE INTO YOUR SHOOTING THAT INCREASES THE SOUND LEVEL, YOU ALSO INCREASE THE RISK OF HEARING LOSS TO YOURSELF AND POSSIBLY THOSE WHO STAND NEAR YOU. BE SURE TO USE ADEQUATE EAR PROTECTION WHEN USING A FIREARM AND BE CAREFUL OF THOSE NEARBY. LAWSUITS HAVE ALREADY BEEN RECOGNIZED FOR GUNFIRE NOISE THAT HAS RESULTED IN HEARING LOSS. ALWAYS CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL AUDIOLOGIST, OTOLOGIST, OR OTOLARYNGOLOGIST WITH YOUR HEARING PROBLEMS. Hearing loss is not fun and can be prevented.

    Compliments of www.earinc.com



    \Note: Rim fire rounds were not mentioned. But in other articles I've seen the figure 140db mentioned. That may be true, but it's also true that a target type ammo shot from a long barrel rifle like the CZ 452 Ultra Lux and the Brno#4 is going to be a lot lower.

    Personal note: I had a job flying light airplanes many years ago. The hearing loss didn'y show up until 2o years later. I'm O.K. with the hearing aids I have. But the tinitus that often accompanies hearing loss is a mind bender.

    Stay safe.

    Tom
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  17. Onward Allusion

    Onward Allusion Member

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    ALWAYS wear hearing protection. Over time, even the lowly 22LR will damage your hearing when fired outdoors. I have mild tinnitus and I hear ringing in my ears when it is quiet.
     
  18. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    As I pause for a moment to enjoy the ringing in my ears......

    YES, ALWAYS WEAR HEARING PROTECTION!!!!!

    Save what hearing you have left. Don't be a dummy, like I was. These days, .22 CB's are the only thing I shoot where I don't use hearing protection.
     
  19. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    WHAT???

    Loud enough to damage your hearing.
     
  20. robert garner

    robert garner Member

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    Take it from an older guy that never wore hearing protection (until shooting on indoor ranges in ROTC) even then we didn't wear them outdoors.
    Your hearing loss won't be noticeable,or even bothersome, till your w..."significant other"
    gets tired of your "What did they say?"...during the movie.
    It's the constant ringing even or maybe especially when your trying to sleep.
    I won't go into the voices here,
    robert
     
  21. Marlin60Man

    Marlin60Man Member

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    What is the difference between the shooting muffs and ear plugs?

    Also, I hear they have noise-canceling ones or something like that where they still allow you to hear when a shot isn't going off. Do you guys know anything about these?
     
  22. cavman

    cavman Member

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    Electronic muffs

    I double up with both muff and plugs.

    I wear Howard Leight electronic muffs. They are about 50 bucks. I went with a friend and he bought some Winchester electronic muffs from Walmart for about 25. Mine are betterbut his are okay too. I love them. Wear plugs and muffs over. The muffs can be turned on and you can hear a whisper even through the plugs. If there is a shot the electronics are turned off and then all you hear is the double dampening from the muffs and plugs.

    Then back to being able to hear voices clearly again. This all happens automatically

    Turn off the muffs when not needed to save the batteries
     
  23. roadchoad

    roadchoad Member

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    Even a .22 short will ring your ears from a revolver. Don't risk it, just wear muffs or plugs.

    I like plugs, because I used to wear them while riding dualsports, and I can also use them when the wife is snoring...:D
     
  24. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Well... muffs are like old style large headphones. Plugs are little things you stuff directly into the ear canal.

    The electronic ones don't cancel the noise. Instead they have an outside microphone and inside speaker. For normal sound levels they pick up and amplify the outside audio to the speaker in the ear cup. When they detect a sudden strong sound they only amplify the signal up to a set point then clip it off at a safe level. Once the high level sound is gone they open the pathway back up.

    That's a nasty way to describe it but it's about all I can think of to describe an audio amplifier which has a strong Automatic Gain Control built into it.

    There are noise cancelling headphones which you can find that allow you to listen to music or speech in noisy environments. But that's not the type of mechanism that is used for shooting muffs. The actual noise cancelling systems work by mimicing the outside sound energy in reverse so your ear hears less of the surrounding noise. This only works for noise of up to a reasonably low level. For something like gun shots the system doesn't work fast enough or well enough. So instead we have AGC electronic sets for shooting.
     
  25. stl_303

    stl_303 Member

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    Muffs AND plugs for me.

    I'm 39 years old, and have about 35% hearing loss and permanent, acute debilitating tinnitus in both ears. No matter where I go or what I'm doing, the tinnitus is the loudest thing in the room.

    There are days where I seriously would want my inner ears surgically removed just so I could for once have real silence.

    When trying to determine why I have such pronounced hearing loss and tinnitus at my age, the audiologist asked me what I did for a living, hobbies. etc.

    1) motorcycle riding
    2) shooting (competitively as a youth)

    his response was "you just named the 2 most dangerous and common things for hearing damage there is"

    The thing is, that hearing loss is cumulative and permanent... and you usually don't notice it until it's too late.

    This tinnitus and hearing loss I started "experiencing" around age 30? yeah.. that was already set into motion when I was a teenager shooting rimfire matches every weekend... and in my 20's riding motorcycles for days on end. (note: it's the WIND that gets you, not the exhaust).

    I wear ear plugs all the time now.. bars, concerts, mowing the lawn, tuning the car... sleeping with my snoring wife, you name it.
    the kicker is that having to wear ear plugs for the wife's snoring cancels out the "white noise" of any of those tinnitus-masking devices that would help me sleep.

    so now I'm in a permanent state of sleep deprivation ta boot!
     
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