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Ithaca 37 ejector

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by Grayrock, Jul 12, 2018 at 12:23 PM.

  1. Grayrock

    Grayrock Member

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    What ejects the shell in the Model 37? I can see the extractor, but don't see what pops out the spent shell with such vigor. I do not have a problem with it, but was messing around with my 16 ga and some empty shells. When I retracted the forearm very slowly, even when the gun was upside down the shell flies out. What is propelling it? I am just curious.
     
  2. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    The ejectors are two notches on the inside on the shell lifter arms.

    When the shell is extracted from the chamber, the shell lifter raises and the shell rim is pulled into the two notches inside the lifter arms and ejected.
    An ingenious John M. Browning design.
     
  3. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    Please note: the shell lifter arms are in the up position when the action is closed and locked.
    When the action is unlocked the bolt moves rear ward extracting the spent shell.
    The head of the shell catches on the lifter notch and is flipped down ward in a rotary motion.
    When the bolt moves fully reward it hits the shell lifter cam and moves the lifter forks down.
    This action sweeps the action clean and releases a fresh shell.

    This is a design by John Browning the worlds greatest gun designer!!
     
  4. rust collector

    rust collector Member

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    I have read that Ithaca planned to release the model 37 upon the expiration of Remington's patents for the model 17, but had to wait awhile longer for Pederson patents to time out. A classic that was worth the wait.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018 at 10:10 AM
  5. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Not quite right; they aid in ejection, as mentioned in post #9 below. But they are not the ejectors.

    I just worked the action of my 37 several times to be sure; the 'cuts' are there to ensure the fork arms are bent in at the right place and angle at the right time. They are actuated by the rim of the shell

    The ejectors are the arms themselves, in conjuction with the arm sticking up from the slide stop (that not surprisingly is there to keep the bolt from coming out of battery, but also functions as the ejector, or more properly, that part of it that prevents further rearward travel of the hull.)
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018 at 11:32 AM
  6. Grayrock

    Grayrock Member

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    I'll run it real slow, but it seems to me that the shell gets ejected before the arms start travelling downward to force the shell out.
     
  7. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Run it upside down. That's what I did earlier.
     
  8. rust collector

    rust collector Member

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    It does seem as though the lifter arms rise up and chuck the empty down on their way to pick up the new round.
     
  9. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    If you do a patent number search on the Ithaca, patent number 1849982.
    You will find the description of operation of the extractor and ejector.
    Page No.3 of the patent document, lines 55 thru 70 describe what the ejector does.
    The patent description calls the cut's "abutments" and is referenced to drawing number 79.

    What everyone says happens and what the gun company says actually happens is two different things.
    I will trust Ithaca and John Browning.
     
  10. entropy

    entropy Member

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    I trust my eyes. I worked my action with dummy rounds, both fast and slow, just before I posted.

    I read the section you referenced. According to the patent, you are right. Mea Culpa. And I am right also. They serve to assure that the case is ejected with the front downward, preventing it re-entering the receiver and jamming it. In this manner, they do serve to ensure that the fork arms are bent at the right angle, and at the right time. The extractor has a very firm grasp of the hull all the way back until a camming surface on the carrier forces the lip of the extractor downward, releasing the hull to be ejected downward (very positively, I might add), using the slide stop in assisting it directionally as I mentioned in #5.

    The abutments actually have a function in the feeding cycle, also. The rim cams them, forcing the arms apart to allow the shell to chamber.
    Makes Browning's design even more amazing. :)
     
  11. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    I do not understand what you say about the camming surface on the carrier forcing the extractor?

    And which extractor? There are two!
    What camming surface???
    Maybe you have a different Ithaca than I do
    I have several from prewar to about 75 vintage, maybe your gun is newer.
     
  12. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Yeah, had a brain fart on that. It's the arms pushing it down that causes the extractor (the one on the bottom of the bolt) to move downward. :oops:
     
  13. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    Actually as the two extractors pull the spent shell from the chamber,
    the rim of the shell hits the abutments on the carrier forks. Flipping the spent shell downward
    in a rotating motion. The only time the lower extractor moves is when it snaps over the rim when the action is closed.
    The upper extractor has a rounded surface and just holds the shell till it the two abutments flipping
    the spent case out of the action.
    If you watch a spent case (not snap cap) it is rotating as it is ejected.
     
  14. entropy

    entropy Member

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    We'll have to agree to disagree; The abutments main function appears to me to be to spread the forks for passage of the shell from above to below (or below to above) them. Once the shell is below the forks, the actual arms of the forks appear to be the conveyance method.
    It has to, and does, move when it releases the rim during extraction. I erroneously attributed this to it camming on something, but after looking at the Numrich schematic, it is merely sprung.
    I could see where the abutments would contact the rim after the shell contacts the slide stop on the way out. This would cause the spinning that does indeed happen.
     
  15. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    The shell never contacts the slide stop. The slide stop is there to lock the slide into the
    locked position. That is forward pushing the breach block up into the receiver's locking notch.

    By the way have you ever loaded a Ithaca without running the shells
    thru the magazine?
     
  16. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Yes, thought I prefer not to. I have done it enough to be competent at doing it.
     
  17. jaguarxk120

    jaguarxk120 Member

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    When I shoot casual trap the guys are waiting for me to slip one into the magazine
    and cycle the action.
    No one see's me lifting a shell into the receiver and pulling the forearm forward.
    I just call for a clay target.
    Usually they look and wonder what did I just do.
     
    entropy likes this.
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