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Lead fowling inside forcing cone? (or cone damage from hot loads)?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by sjcslk, Feb 15, 2011.

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  1. sjcslk

    sjcslk Member

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    I've been looking at my S&W model 65 after reading about cracked cones from shooting 125 grain rounds; since I've put 15 of those through the gun recently (not knowing this was a probelm). I don't see a cracked cone, but there seems to be a lot of rough spots inside the cone. (I'm new to handgunning). I think what I may be seeing, is lead fouling from shooting the Cabella's 38 special semi-wadcutters that I had bought in bulk a few years ago. Does this make sense? Whats best for removing lead fouling inside the forcing cone? or do you think its some kind of damage from 15 hot loads?
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2011
  2. Flint Ridge

    Flint Ridge Member

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  3. Drail

    Drail Member

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    Everyone who shoots should own a Lewis lead remover unless you only shoot jacketed rounds. (must be nice to be wealthy) What you are seeing in your forcing cone is either lead deposits or erosion from flame cutting. With only 15 rounds I doubt you have flame damaged your forcing cone. It takes at least a few hundred rounds of the hot 125 grainers to really see any damage. Have you shot a box or two of factory lead? Most factory loads that are lead are soft swaged lead, which will do a nice job of leading up your bore. Swaged lead turns almost liquid when fired through a bore and leaves a real mess. The Lewis lead remover is your friend. It comes with a attachment just for forcing cones. You can also wrap a piece of copper scouring pad around an old bore brush and pull it through. This works really well for lots of lead shooters. 90% of my shooting for the last twenty years or so has been hard cast lead bullets. They leave very minimal leading that will normally brush right out. Once your get your bore and cone clean look at it closely under a strong light and you should be able to tell what you're looking at. Probably just lead. A flame damaged cone will look like it was sandblasted.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2011
  4. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    Lewis Lead Remover in .38 caliber PERPETUALLY OUT OF STOCK at Brownells.

    What's up with that?
    Did Mr. Lewis die or something?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. sjcslk

    sjcslk Member

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    foulings

    Also, are there threads just inside the forcing cone? When I took a brush to it this morning, it looks like there's machinge threads & that's what may be accumulating the foulings. I need to get a bore light to see better.

    (Sorry, title should have been foulings).
     
  6. Drail

    Drail Member

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    No there should not be threads in the cone. You are probably looking at burrs left by a dull cutting tool or a tool with a lot of chatter (play) in it. Rough cones can be smoothed and polished with the proper tools. The forcing cone attachment on the Lewis lead remover can be wrapped with a small piece of sandpaper andd rotated to smooth the surface.
     
  7. BigDog2

    BigDog2 Member

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    Buy a LEWIS
     
  8. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Did Mr. Lewis die or something?

    Brownell's bought the Lewis Lead Remover company a few years ago.
    They'll be back in stock soon.

    The Lewis tool also removes copper and carbon deposits off the forcing cone, not just lead.
     
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