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locked-breech recoil vs. blow-back recoil

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by peacebutready, Apr 10, 2012.

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  1. peacebutready

    peacebutready Member

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    Good Day,

    All things being equal, how much more recoil do blow-back models produce compared to locked-breech models.

    Best.
     
  2. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    It isnt just increased recoil, it also is more abrupt. I can't explain it well, but it feels...different.
     
  3. Sicari

    Sicari Member

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    Not exactly a scientific answer, but, recoil will be a lot more.
    Because basically, in a blow-back system, the frame of the gun becomes a part of you and the recoil becomes more like firing a gun which has a weight close to only the weight of the slide (or other recoiling parts). I'm sure someone here can explain this better.
     
  4. Redlg155

    Redlg155 Member

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    Typical blowback wepons rely on mass and relatively heavy springs to manage recoil. Increased slide weight and straight blow back action can lead to heavier recoil.

    My Sig P238 weighs less and is much smaller than my Makarov. 380, yet the Makarov recoils more.
     
  5. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    The .380 recoils less than 9x18, though. Shooting a Bersa 380 and a PA-63 side by side, they both are about the same size and weight and both are blowback. But the 9x18 just has more oomph to it.

    Lots of people shoot high points and I haven't heard any complaints about recoil.
     
  6. Got_Lead?

    Got_Lead? Member

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    Blowbacks can transmit a pretty sharp whack as the slide strikes the slide stop of the frame. Locked breech pistols typically recoil much softer because of their much slower moving slides.

    Slide slap should not be confused with the recoil reaction of launching the projectile. A revolver's recoil is almost limited to the launching of the projectile. In an automatic, some of the projectile's recoil is absorbed by the springs in the gun, however, if the slide hits the stop with a lot of speed, it's going to be felt in the hand of the shooter. Makarovs, P64's, and PPK's are notorious for having painful recoil because of slide slap.
     
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