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Lyman GPP Or Pedersoli Kentucky Pistol Kits? And What Tools Are Needed?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Blackpowdershooter44, Jan 9, 2017.

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Lyman Gpp or Pedersoli Kentucky Pistol?

Poll closed Jan 16, 2017.
  1. Pedersoli Kentucky Pistol Kit

    50.0%
  2. Lyman Great Plains Pistol Kit

    50.0%
  1. Blackpowdershooter44

    Blackpowdershooter44 Member

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    Hi there,

    I've been looking into getting a Lyman Great Plains Pistol kit or a Pedersoli Kentucky Pistol kit and am leaning toward the GPP, but would like to hear your thoughts on your favorite and why.

    Also, what tools would be needed to build these kits? I've seen Mike Belvieau's videos on putting together a single shot pistol kit and they are very helpful, but would like to see a list of the tools necessary for the build.
    Btw, if I were to get a kentucky pistol, it would be a percussion version.
    Thanks!
     
  2. daboyleroy

    daboyleroy Member

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  3. Jimster

    Jimster Member

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    I voted Lyman kit. I've built several of their GPR kits and they are very easy to build and very solid in looks and function. I've not built their pistol kit. If I was going to spend money on a Pedersoli made firearm I would buy it already finished (I love Pedersoli products by the way) instead of building the kit. Looks like a more involved kit to build than the Lyman but that may appeal to you. Why percussion? Flintlock is the pure essence of black powder.
     
    Cooldill and midland man like this.
  4. Blackpowdershooter44

    Blackpowdershooter44 Member

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    I was looking at the pictures of the Lyman and after rewatching Mike's build series on the Kenutcky pistol, it sure does look a lot easier to put together. Less stock work, not much brass to finish up, etc. I'm sure I would enjoy either though. I was thinking percussion because it would be easier to deal with than flintlocks, easier to use, and less misfires and such. But I probably could be persuaded to get a flinter.
     
  5. Jimster

    Jimster Member

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    My black powder journey started back in 1977 and I shot percussion for years. I've long since gravitated to flint but I guess it's a personal evolvement. I really like the early colonial era of history. You may do better to stick with percussion.
     
  6. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    I voted for the Lyman as I have seen first hand what great shooters they are. But, so are Pedersoli pistols, I just haven't seem them first hand.
     
  7. Steel Horse Rider

    Steel Horse Rider Member

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    I have built two of the Pedersoli Kentucky pistol kits, one in flint and one cap gun. I have built 6 Pedersoli kits to date, two pistols and 4 long guns. I use files, including half round, round, and flat in several different tooth profiles, a small block shurform, a small block plane, a draw knife, and lots of sand paper, including sanding blocks. You will also need several grades of steel wool for finishing the wood and finishing the finish. A good apron will also keep the wife happy as you will not bring your project into the house or laundry with your clothing. A lot of patience will help greatly also.
    Good luck on whatever you choose, it is well worth the time and effort.
     
    midland man likes this.
  8. midland man

    midland man Member

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    I like doing the kits as it gives you something to work towards and be proud of!! :)
     
  9. Blackpowdershooter44

    Blackpowdershooter44 Member

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  10. Jimster

    Jimster Member

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    I've always used Birchwood Casey's Plum Brown Barrel finish but I've always heard good things about Laurel Mountain Forge.
     
  11. DeoreDX

    DeoreDX Member

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    I used Laurel Mountain forge and it was very easy. I like how you don't need to to be super meticulous in cleaning off every spec of grease from the barrel to use it. I did it in my spare bathroom and ran a hot shower filling the bottom of the tub with hot water and closed the bathroom door. I also closed all of the HVAC vents. Kept the room warm and humid and the barrel browned quickly. Started in the morning day 1 and did a couple of "passes" on the first day for a total or 4 passes. By the next morning the barrel was fully browned.

    I did Kentucky Rifle recently. Tools I used:

    Sandpaper.
    Sanding block
    Electric 1/4 sheet sander. Used with 150 grit for heavy material removal needed at the beginning.
    Pencil with a strap of sandpaper wrapped around it to help work the inlet.
    Files, one large 12" flat file and a small precision file set.
    Hollow ground screwdriver set.
    Drill press
    $3.99 dowling set which I used as a point to point jig for my drill press. You can buy them or make them yourself. Not necessary if you have a long enough drill bit for your tenon pins which I didn't.

    http://www.hootalrifleshop.org/tang_bolt_jig.htm

    [​IMG]

    For the precision file set I mostly used a really nice Nicholson set. But I was at Harbor Freight to get a throw away small triangular file to use in the dovetails. You want a triangular file with a cutting edge on only one or two sides when working in the dovetails and I didn't want to grind on an expensive set of files. Turns out in the small H.F. file set it comes with a triangular file with two "safe" sides which was invaluable with the dovetails. Seem to cut just as well as my Nicholson set at a fraction of the price.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Blackpowdershooter44

    Blackpowdershooter44 Member

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    Thank you for the very informative post, I'll use the Laurel Mountain Forge Browning/Bluing solution. Next time I'm at Harbor Freight I'll look for those files.
     
  13. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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  14. daboyleroy

    daboyleroy Member

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    1 it was my vote, other choices were ok but a Charles Morre...it's a looker
    2 see if anyone would know what it was
    3. Did I mention.....it's a looker
     
  15. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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    Oh, I see. Just a little hard to understand with no text given.
     
  16. rdstrain49

    rdstrain49 Member

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    You
    got me all excited, then I found out they don't make it in a kit :(
     
  17. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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    It's okay. They do great work, their finishing (at least on the higher models) is very good. You should still get one. It may well be my next pistol, but I can't decide on flintlock or percussion...
     
  18. midland man

    midland man Member

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    flintlock :) they are fun!!
     
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  19. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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    I've used the same Harbor Freight needle file set on several gunsmithing projects, very nice! :)
     

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