Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Mim

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by PinnedAndRecessed, Sep 17, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. PinnedAndRecessed

    PinnedAndRecessed member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,542
    Would somebody please tell me what MIM means?

    Thanx.
     
  2. UnknownSailor

    UnknownSailor Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    595
    Location:
    Bremerton, WA
    Metal Injection Moulding.

    Liquid metal is pumped into a mold under pressure.
     
  3. PinnedAndRecessed

    PinnedAndRecessed member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,542
    Is that the same thing as cast?
     
  4. Tharg

    Tharg Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Messages:
    566
    Location:
    DFW TX
    Cast is usually kinda pour'd in i thought...

    i'm sure there is something to the process that strengthens over casting - otherwise it would be cheaper to do w/a casting.
     
  5. horge

    horge Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2003
    Messages:
    1,132
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hi! :)

    MIM?

    Nope, no liquid metal is involved.
    Metal Injection Molding involves metal powder mixed with a polymer binder, together used to fill a precise mold. The binder is there to 'glue' the metal grains together. You pop the weakly-bonded part out of the mold (thus, the mold can be used again right away), and subject the part to enough controlled heat over time, so that the polymer burns away into nada and the metal grains fuse/sinter together.

    Since you're not really 'melting' the metal outright, and the binder loiters a bit, it retains its molded shape throughout, without benefit of a mold. The process eliminates a lot of hassle regarding quantity of molds needed, as well as durability of molds vs. repeated exposure to heat. With precise molds, you can get pretty intricate shapes, with no need for machining afterwrds. MIM parts are thus cheaper to produce, ....and, well, just plain cheaper, hehe.

    However, if the powder grains are insufficiently fused you get weak parts. On top of that, even a better-sintered product is still weaker than a well-cast or well-forged equivalent, so MIM replacements for standard forged or cast parts tend to be beefier in proportions to compensate.
    :)
    hth
    horgy porgy
     
  6. Tharg

    Tharg Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Messages:
    566
    Location:
    DFW TX
    Thanks! Learn something new every day..

    was under the impression that MIM was better than cast...

    i stand corrected =)

    J/Tharg!

    (and no - i didn't look it up... rofl i should have - just assumed since i've seen metal injected molding - as a "feature" that it was something noteworthy... i was wrong :) )
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page