New Blackhawk

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by crooked stripe, Jan 18, 2012.

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  1. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Member

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    I picked up a New Blackhawk to go along with my New Vaquero. Is the bh in the same category as the Vaquero as far as standard loads go. The bh is a357 mag and going by the serial # was made around 1973. I found it at a pawn shop covered in dried stained oil with some pitting from rust on the hammer. Looked like it was oiled well and put away and never used. Took a lot of soaking and scrubbing to get the crud off. Gave 250 for it. Taking it out tomorrow to fire it up and see how it shoots.
     

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  2. -eaux-

    -eaux- Member

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    you got a heckuva deal any way you slice it. Provided the Ruger meets all the criteria cited in the sticky post above: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=1430
    You ain't gonna wear out a Ruger with standard loads. In fact there's a reason that some hot loads are referred to with a wink as "Ruger Only" loads.
     
  3. Nomad

    Nomad Member

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    Good choice at a good price.
     
  4. Lawdawg45

    Lawdawg45 Member

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    I'm not sure what you're asking here, but the old model Vaquero and the Blackhawk are the only ones approved for "Ruger only" loads.;)

    LD
     
  5. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Member

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    My Blackhawk is called a New Blackhawk on the side of the revolver. Does this mean NO Ruger only loadings?
     
  6. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    It's a .357, there is no such thing as "Ruger only" loads in that chambering. There is no strength issue whatsoever concerning .357's.

    PS, there are also no "Old Model" Vaqueros. "Old Model" is Ruger's official designation for those single actions made up to 1973 with the traditional half cock action and no transfer bar. Vaqueros were introduced in 1992 and are New Models utilizing the "New Model" lockwork.

    Vaquero (large frame)
    New Vaquero (mid-frame)
    Simple.
     
  7. kanook

    kanook Member

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    That Ruger should handle the original 357mag loads with no problem. Much hotter then than now.

    As long as it is not compromised anywhere, it will outlast all of us.

    If you are new to reloading, be very careful, and go slow. Just because it is built like a tank doesn't mean things can't go wrong.

    Or what would be best is just get some of the top end manufactured ammo. Buffalo Bore, Grizzly, Garrets
     
  8. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Member

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    I am new and have no intention on shooting hot magnum loads. Just curious after the New Vaquero issues. I didn't realize it said New Blackhawk till I got home. Must have been to excited after finding it at such a price. Grip is small and the trigger guard bites me on my middle finger. Needs larger grips with finger guard. I was just looking for a Hogue grip. -eaux-, no tampering and cylinder gap is small with everything lining up. No excessive play with any parts. Thank you for all your help. John
     
  9. atlanticfire

    atlanticfire Member

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    Blackhawks are killer! I purchased one in 45lc for my brother for doing some engine work on my truck. Shooting the heavy loads from it is alot fo fun.
     
  10. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    As CraigC pointed out, the original .357 Magnum Blackhawk was made on what is now called a mid-sized frame. It also did not have a transfer bar safety to prevent an accidental discharge if the revolver was dropped, and hit on the hammer while there was a loaded chamber in front of it.

    In 1973 Ruger revised his line of single action revolvers, and included a transfer bar safety to prevent the accidental discharges referred to above. At the same time he discontinued the mid-sized frame, and thereafter made the .357 Magnum version using the same frame and cylinder size that had been developed for the .44 Magnum.

    So what you have is a .357 Magnum built on the larger .44 Magnum platform, and you also have the transfer bar safety so you can carry it with the cylinder fully loaded with 6 cartridges. Therefore go forward and not worry about any .357 Magnum ammunition made by any company, or any listed handloaded data, although I suggest you avoid the "Ruger or Thompson Center Only" loads unless you are a very experienced reloader who understands how to evaluate signs of excessive pressure.
     
  11. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    Crooked Stripe, if you're like me and wear large to Xlarge glove sizes then likely you're finding that the stock grips are a little small around the bend in the "neck" of the grips. I made up some fatter ones for both my Single Six and Super Blackhawk and love the new feel. With the stockers my fingers wrapped around so far that they were jamming into my palm. With the new fat grips the middle finger wraps around and just barely touches my palm. This gives me a far nicer hold. This better hold along the wider area along the back strap that spreads out the recoil energy to a bigger portion of my hand greatly reduced the "guard bite".

    If you do much in the way of wood working of your own it's not a huge deal to make some. Rather fun and rewarding actually. It's a bit fussy getting the edges just right so they match. A good tool for this is a coarse metal file used as a "rasp".

    Otherwise I'm not sure where to buy them but I'm sure someone can help you out if you think it'll help you.
     
  12. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Member

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    I never gave making a set of grips a thought. I have been working with finish wood for over forty years, now retired. My hands aren't that large but my middle finger on my right hand hit the trigger guard. After a few shots I have a blister from the guard hitting my finger. I ordered a set of Hogue grips from Ruger. They are the only one I could find that don't charge 14 + dollars for shipping. Grips with shipping where 28 bucks, not bad.
     
  13. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    Ruger's factory grips are terrible. They're thin where they should be thick, thick where they should be thin and squared off where they should be round. Some folks like them thinner, I like mine a little thicker at the top (aptly described as the "neck" by BCR) with less taper towards the bottom. Beveled bottoms for regular Blackhawk/Colt SAA/Navy grips, flat bottoms for the longer 1860 Army/Bisley grip frames. Either way, nicely rounded at the neck.

    That said, I despise oversized rubber grips on a single action. They ruin the fine handling qualities and actually send more of the recoil pulse straight back into the palm.
     
  14. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    that and its blasphemy!!! lol

    If you don't want to make them your self try http://www.privatescustomgrips.com/
    his have the gunfighter profile thats wider at the top that's very popular. plus they're fun to show off.
    SANY0077.jpg
     
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