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Painting synthetic stock?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by TEXASTACTICAL, May 30, 2004.

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  1. TEXASTACTICAL

    TEXASTACTICAL Member

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    I just got an 870 with a synthetic stock and I was thinking about painting it OD. Anybody have any advice or pointers on paint or prep? Will paint stick to synthetics? Anyone know where I can get some good OD paint? How durable would paint be on a synthetic stock? Any help would be much appreciated.
     
  2. thumbtack

    thumbtack Member

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    Krylon Fusion

    This stuff is supposed to adhere to plastics and polymers a lot better then most paint, you might try it.
     
  3. Amish_Bill

    Amish_Bill Member

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    Make sure it's absolutely clean before you start painting. No skin oils, no cleaner residues, no nothing.

    You might also want to rough-up the surface a bit before you start. Fine steel wool or one of those dish scrubby things. (just not he ones with soap in them)
     
  4. spartacus2002

    spartacus2002 Member

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    If you're looking to create a nonskid surface to grip better in bad conditions, try spraying on spray-on truckbed liner first. For painting, Krylon makes a series of ultra-flat camo paint, in OD, tan, brown, and black.
     
  5. DMK

    DMK Member

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    I've had good luck with Alumahyde II from Brownells. I also painted my plastic air intake tube in my car with Krylon over grey primer. None of these have chipped.

    As recommended above, clean the stock well. It is imperative to get all oils off the stock before painting. I like to use Simply Green or Purple Power cleaners then liberally douse with hot water. Only handle with clean disposable rubber gloves after that.

    Roughing up the surface with some 600 grit sandpaper of scotchbrite before cleaning wouldn't be a bad idea either. It gives the paint something to bite into.

    Most bad paint jobs failed due to poor prep.
     
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