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Pinned and Recessed

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by redranger1, Aug 20, 2006.

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  1. redranger1

    redranger1 Member

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    What does this mean? How is it done?
     
  2. XavierBreath

    XavierBreath Member

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  3. SaxonPig

    SaxonPig Member

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    To elaborate a bit, pinned and recessed (P&R) generally refers to S&W revolvers. Prior to 1982 all S&Ws had small pins mounted cross-ways at the rear of the barrels to help secure them. Also prior to 1982 the rim-fire and magnum caliber revolvers featured the recessed (counterbored) chambers that enclosed the case rims. The calibers like .38 Special and .44 Special never had this, just the rim-fires and the magnum calibers. Now only the rim-fire guns have this.

    Most other manufacturers, like Colt, never used the pinned barrels and recessed chambers on center-fire revolvers.
     
  4. PinnedAndRecessed

    PinnedAndRecessed member

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    What's it mean?

    It's my screen name.

    How's it done?

    Years ago, shortly after world war 2, my father met my mother...........
     
  5. Croyance

    Croyance Member

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    It was believed that the extra case support was needed for the magnum rounds (.357 Magnum and .44 Magnum) but this was found to be untrue. I like the look though.
    The pinned barrel was to keep it from unscrewing, which was also found to be unneccesary.
     
  6. unspellable

    unspellable Member

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    P&R

    The recessed chamber does not support the case rim. The recess is over sized for that. What it was meant to do was retain small bits of metal in the event of a case head failure.

    The pin was meant to keep the barrel from unscrewing. The alternative is a crush fit which tends to distort the inner barrel dimensions and can theoretically result in the bore being a bit undersized at the breech. Something that is detrimental to accuracy.

    Eliminating these features was a cost cutting measure.

    It interesting to note that while the risk of a case head failure with today’s brass is very small, they have deleted this potential safety feature as a cost cutting measure while implementing the politically correct inside lock which in actuality creates a potential hazard.
     
  7. dispatch

    dispatch Member

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    It means that if you have one, you own a piece that displays the craftmanship that used to be common in firearms and other manufactured products. If you will closely examine a revolver built to the standards of that day, you will see many refinements that seldom exist in newer firearms.
    Not to say that many new firearms are not of exceptional, and often better design and execution. If, however, you see the differences in a 60's model 427 Shelby Cobra and a new Ford Mustang you probably get the point.
     
  8. Bob R

    Bob R Member

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    Here are pics of 2 different Smith and Wessons. The blue is P&R, the nickle isn't. Once you see the difference it is fairly obvious.

    Pinned/nonPinned barrel:

    100_0944.gif

    Recessed/nonRecessed cylinder:

    100_0945.gif

    Cylinder with cartridge inserted, Recessed/nonRecessed:

    100_0946.gif

    Hope this helps.

    bob
     
  9. Confederate

    Confederate Member

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    From a metallurgical standpoint, today's revolvers will probably stand up better to modern pressures; however, I have two pinned and recessed revolvers and one of them is a 629. I also liked the sideplate being stamped. It was just another nice touch. Also, most of today's stainless revolvers look like they were finished with sandpaper. The older Smith & Wessons were very easy on the eyes. Since I don't have any children, I'll probably one day either give it away or sell it. (Or hell, maybe I'll just have it buried with me.)

    The old model 66s also were wonderful guns. I still love recessed cylinders and wouldn't mind paying the extra $$$ for it. Hey, maybe if they did away with the locks....
     
  10. Croyance

    Croyance Member

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    Design changes made about two decades apart.
     
  11. Magnum PI

    Magnum PI Member

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    SAF-T-Wesson

    "It interesting to note that while the risk of a case head failure with today’s brass is very small, they have deleted this potential safety feature as a cost cutting measure while implementing the politically correct inside lock which in actuality creates a potential hazard."

    This is because S&W is owned by Saf-T-Hammer, which makes those locks. They manage to sell both the guns and locks by NOT giving the consumer a choice.

    They should re-name themselves to SAF-T-Wesson and see how many guns they sell !!

    MPI
     
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