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Polygonal Rifling Barrels - Why don't more gunmakers use them?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by AirPower, Aug 16, 2004.

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  1. AirPower

    AirPower Member

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    Polygonal rifling seems to be an interesting design, it's used by HK, Glock and Desert Eagle. Is there pro/con to it? My desert eagle barrel looks really nice after each shooting and cleanup is a snap. No residue or jacket fouling stuck in lands/grooves.
     
  2. mtnboomer

    mtnboomer Member

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    I've heard reports that bullets with very thick jackets can cause higher pressures in polygonal rifling because they do not "reshape" to the flat-sided rifling very well. I've also heard that barrels with polygonal rifling are much more expensive to make because they have to be hammer-forged.
     
  3. BHPshooter

    BHPshooter Member

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    One reason is that it's dangerous to use lead (and some say copper-washed) bullets in polygonal barrels, as the pressure is vastly increased.

    It's all a big trade-off. It would be nice if guns would come with traditional and polygonal barrels fitted to the gun... but what are the chances?

    Wes
     
  4. WhoKnowsWho

    WhoKnowsWho Member

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    Well... if you had an early USP40 like me you could have the traditional barrel. And then you could get a new barrel with polygonal rifling.

    I prefer the traditional since I like the option of using lead (or soft jackets) without a problem to worry about.
     
  5. telewinz

    telewinz Member

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    Mainly its because most of our reloading data and testing equipment is geared towards conventional rifling (liability lawyers:barf: ) I see no logic that higher pressures result since the bullet bearing surfaces are the same regardless of the type of rifling, what rifling DOESN'T support the bullet walls 100%? The main problem is the build-up of lead residue that can cause problems with proper/safe chambering (Glock) and the gas system (H&K P7-8). Hard cast bullets should work fine but how about the risk factor involved with the guy that shoots 500 rounds of butter soft lead bullets without cleaning his pistol?:what: In traditional rifling, the lands and grooves will "trap" the residue. In polygonal rifling it just builds up on the walls of the bore (like a shotgun) which results in a gradual increase in pressure that continues upward until removed (cleaning) or KA-BOOM!
     
  6. bigjim

    bigjim Member

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    LOL!!!!
     
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