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Polymer-frame revolvers?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by CleverNickname, Mar 24, 2004.

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  1. CleverNickname

    CleverNickname Member

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    Does such a thing exist? If not, why? (Other than the fact that most revolver shooters would probably consider it a crime against nature.)
     
  2. Majic

    Majic Member

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    One thought is that the forces created when shooting are contained in the steel slide of the pistol. It's then reduced thru the compression of the springs as it's tranfered to the frame.
    Since the revolver has no sprung reciprocating slide to help dissapate the energy, all of the force is transmitted to the frame. Given the elasticity of polymer it might not hold up to the forces without metal reinforcement. Considering the amount of metal needed, the remaining percentage of polymer added would be minimal. Not to mention we revolver shooters would hang the manufactors by the short hairs if they even try that.
     
  3. Josey

    Josey member

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    I think it could be done. There would have to be carbon steel reinforcemen, carbon fiber and even graphite parts to control stresses and forces. The barrel would be a weak point. I would think a steel tube with a polymer shroud could work. How could you keep the tube, shroud and frame attached? Internal action parts would need hardened and reinforced points for pins to hold them in proper alignment. The ideal candidate for such a revolver would be the Webley-Fosberry.
     
  4. Youngster

    Youngster Member

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    There is something called the Izhmash MP412, which is a polymer framed .357 Magnum break top revolver developed in Russia, I don't think they went anywhere with the design however...
     
  5. caz223

    caz223 Member

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    Nobody I know would buy one, that's why not....
     
  6. Tamara

    Tamara Senior Member

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    The basic frame would probably have to remain steel or alloy due to stretching issues that could affect timing, and the fact that the frame also serves as the revolver's breechface.

    Five gets you ten that the latch area, standing breech and bottom of the cylinder window are a steel subassembly inside a polymer shell. :)
     
  7. ruger357

    ruger357 Member

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    Plastic wheelguns?:barf:
     
  8. Brian D.

    Brian D. Member

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    Even my cap gun revolvers were (okay, still are) all metal!:D
     
  9. MrAcheson

    MrAcheson Member

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    You could use a polymer gripframe in a revolver. A true polymer frame seems iffy to me. Polymer composites don't tend to do well in impact loading.
     
  10. scott45b

    scott45b Member

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    Impact loading, alignment, timing and strength are all key issues. A polymer frame for a revolver could be made. By using a combination of insert molding and glass or carbon fiber reinforcement the strength could be achieved. To keep the stresses low, the barrel would have to be short, 2" or less. A striker should be used instead of a hammer. The gun could be used as an "emergency" weapon, but if it were stored in the trunk of a car in Las Vegas for 10 summers and was never parked in the shade........the possibility for distortion is extremely high. If the gun were lightweight similar to the Scandium Frames from S&W it would probably be uncomfortable to shoot.

    It could be done, but why?
     
  11. valnar

    valnar Member

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    All these wonderful technical reasons aside, there is simply no need for one. No one is asking for it.

    Smith & Wesson's scandium based revolvers are about as light as any sane person would want. Any lighter (which I assume would be the desired benefit of Polymer?) would be next to unmanageable.

    My 2 cents.

    -Robert
     
  12. The_Antibubba

    The_Antibubba Member

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    Imagine-All Black, Carbon Fiber Revolver!

    Skunkabilly would but one. :D
     
  13. c_yeager

    c_yeager Member

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    I'd buy one to carry if it could be made small enough and the problems could be resolved. I think the problem is that on a revolver any frame flex at all is very bad. A semi can have a certain amount of flexibility without hurting function at all. Unfortunatly on a revolver getting the cylinder gap and timing to be really consistant with a polymer frame is going to be tricky.
     
  14. MikeB

    MikeB Member

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    Please no! It's bad enough they've produced plastic 1911's. A plastic revolver would be a crime against nature.

    BTW I have on of those Scandium Smith's. It doesn't just recoil back and up, but it twists as well when firing .357 Mag. I can't imagine that would be good for a polymer frame.
     
  15. Min

    Min Member

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    Clevernickname, you are a prophet.

    You foresaw the Ruger LCR back in 2004.
     
  16. scott45b

    scott45b Member

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    Clevernickname foresaw the LCR, I told them how to make it!
     
  17. bflobill_69

    bflobill_69 Member

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    I rue the day... but seeing what Ruger is doing, steel may soon be a thing of the past for revolvers!

    Bflobill69
     
  18. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    Or more likely, and hopefully, Sturm Ruger will be a thing of the past.
     
  19. MatthewVanitas

    MatthewVanitas Member

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    Oh sure, it's always great when a company that produces thousands upon thousands of good-quality US-made guns goes under... :rolleyes:

    Bill Ruger is dead, Ruger is making full-cap magazines and pocket pistols again, what more do you want? The use far fewer internal locks than S&W, and what locks they do use (such as on the Vaquero) are easily removable by replacing the mainspring. They've had some teething issues with the LCP and SR9, but have made good on that with customer service. What more can you really ask of Ruger?

    Or is this just "yuck, plastic!" ?
     
  20. Bearhands

    Bearhands Member

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    Kind of an anti view.... I certainly wouldn't want any American company to become a thing of the past.
     
  21. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    Ruger never reversed itself publicly or apologized for Bill's demented policies. I don't like many of their guns either as an objective thing, but that's different.

    Plenty of companies would leave the world a better place for their disappearance. Walmart Stores, Inc., for one. Citibank, for another. Continental Airlines, for a third.
     
  22. Bearhands

    Bearhands Member

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    Duke, you need to quit watching msnbc. I'm just not sure how an apology from Ruger has any effect on you personally?.... I don't like Heinz Catsup(Ketchup) because of their owner, but I sure don't want them to go out of business. Back to the FRAME... it is Monolithic Aluminum... not polymer
     
  23. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    Kurtz catsup is my brand of choice. I'll not have Heinz in my house.
     
  24. homers

    homers Member

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    Yes, successful companies like Walmart where they force people to enter and buy products at competitive prices, while hiring 100's of thousands of people (many of whom would be unemployed or be getting lower wages because they lack skills) all the while paying boatloads of taxes should be put out of business.
     
  25. sidheshooter

    sidheshooter Member

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    Lower wages than Wally World? Is that actually possible in this country?
    ;)

    Seriously though, comparing Ruger to citibank and the like is a bit of a stretch, but to each their own. Down with predatory lending. Long live the SP-101!

    (In before the lock... this one is heading that direction: locked up tighter than a defective new S&W...) ;)
     
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