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Polymer tip rifle rounds and suppressors

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by feedthehogs, Jul 10, 2009.

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  1. feedthehogs

    feedthehogs Member

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    Anybody have any issues with running polymer tip rounds thru a suppressor?
    AAC says they could become unstable in the suppressor.

    Got a 5.7 upper for the AR and only have the polymer tip ammo. Want to run it thru the Ranger.
     
  2. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    Doesn't make sense to me... unless you're using wipes the tip of the bullet doesn't have any contact with the suppressor. :confused:
     
  3. PTK

    PTK Member

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    I think you misunderstood what AAC told you. I use my M4-1000 on my PS90 all the time, with the blue tip ammo.
     
  4. feedthehogs

    feedthehogs Member

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    No but a jacket seperation will casue instability and damage to the innerds of the suppressor.
     
  5. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    Kay... are you saying polymer tipped rounds cause jacket separation?

    Feedthehogs perhaps they were talking about sabots or something. Most of those are polymer. That would make sense to me.
     
  6. Tarvis

    Tarvis Member

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    A 5.7x28 sabot round eh? Not likely. A jacket separation may be a problem. Then again I haven't seen too many polymer tipped bullets come apart before. Instability is usually associated with bullet weight and twist rate, so I don't think the style of tip should be your concern.

    I suggest posting the quote from thier website. Sounds to me like the devil is in the details.
     
  7. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    maybe it as to do with the length of the projectile. because of the low density of the polymer tip, bullets of a given weight may tend to be quite a bit longer, then a lead/copper bulelt.

    That extra length, coupled with initial yaw could cause suppressor strikes.
     
  8. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    initial yaw?
     
  9. seanie!

    seanie! Member

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    ^^^Before the bullet stabilizes itself in the air. It technically tumbles, for lack of a better word.
     
  10. Oldtrader3

    Oldtrader3 Member

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    If the bullets become unstable in the suppressor, why bother to suppress except for short range. The pressure instability would destabilize the bullets trajectory rendering worthless accuracy. Maybe in a spray-for-effect rifle this is acceptable but not for anything else.
     
  11. freakshow10mm

    freakshow10mm member

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    A bullet is not 100% stable during the first few inches of leaving the muzzle. It is still stabilizing a few feet from the muzzle. Take some shots at very close range on paper and you can see a slight keyhole to the bullet hole.
     
  12. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    Its more gyroscopic procession than tumbling. M855 from an M16A2 has as much as 6 degrees of yaw as it leasves the muzzle. It takes as much as 50 feet for the yaw to settle out (usually much less than 50 feet)
     
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