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Quick Question About M1911 Storage

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by CmdrSlander, Jun 7, 2012.

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  1. CmdrSlander

    CmdrSlander Member

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    I go to the range about once per month, when not in use my M1911 lives in the safe. I store the 1911 "cocked and locked" but empty. Which is to say, there is no round in the chamber but the hammer is back and the safety is engaged.I assume this is okay, but I am slightly worried it may be bad for the gun, that doing this may put unnecessary pressure on the safety assembly or some other component. Is it harmful to store my M1911 in this way?
     
  2. WC145

    WC145 Member

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    Can't think of any reason it would hurt or unduly stress the gun but, out of curiosity, why do you do that? The only ones I keep cocked and locked are loaded, the others are kept hammer down, no mag. Everybody is different I guess.:)
     
  3. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    I was once personally involved with a commercial Government Model that laid in an attic cocked and locked with a chambered round and 6 in the magazine for 62 years. It worked fine.
     
  4. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    :scrutiny: I may be missing something, but ... why? If my gun is going to be cocked and locked, it is also going to be loaded.
     
  5. CmdrSlander

    CmdrSlander Member

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    Well I guess it is because after each range trip I usually at least field strip the gun for cleaning. Upon reassembly I test that everything is in order by racking the slide several times, this of course cocks the hammer. I usually then just flick on the safety (force of habit, don't like to see the hammer back with the safety off unless there's shooting to be done) and put it away.
     
  6. Greg528iT

    Greg528iT Member

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    Springs are very resilient, aka the 62 year cocked and locked story.
    BUT, a 1911 can be dry fired, so after cleaning and assembling, test the make sure the trigger still works.. then put it away hammer down.
     
  7. iLikeOldgunsIlikeNewGuns

    iLikeOldgunsIlikeNewGuns Member

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    As already said it isn't bad for the spring to leave the hammer back indefinitely. But if you want, hammer-up can be like an 'unloaded' chamber indicator, just of course remember that all guns are always loaded, especially the ones that you know are unloaded... so an indicator of what to expect, but not to assume.
     
  8. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    That's what it is for me. If the hammer is cocked, the chamber is hot. If the hammer is forward, the chamber is empty...but I still check it.

    Rule of thumb: If the gun has been out of your sight...don't assume that it's empty. Look.
     
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