Revolver Resurgence-?

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Ed Bulldog

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A question:
1) do you believe the Snubby/Revolver is regaining popularity-?

Observation:
1) Companies, such as Kimber and others- have entered this marketplace
There must be a projected significant profit potential
2) Notice an increase in revolver coverage via the different social media and written gun devoted sites

Your thoughts and observations-?

Thank you
 
1) Yes, the snubby pocket gun is a successful niche item for NPE carry; low risk, single opponent likely incidents. The revival of 32 cal revolvers giving an extra shot and range of various recoil loads makes them popular. The new SW guns with enhance sights are an interesting experiment.
2. Bigger revolvers may be popular for the untrained and not wanting to be trained underwear gun folks. A 38 SPL SW, Ruger, Kimber, Taurus, etc. will serve their purpose as compared to some semi that seems complex.
3. The higher levels of trainers are all atwitter about the new Js, 32 cal gun and significant snubby training events are springing up.
4. However, I opine the 10 mm semis will eclipse the big revolvers for woods SD, but the wheel guns designed for hunting (not OMG - it's Smokey) will survive.
 
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This fills me with anger every time I think about it, but it is a fact of living here:

The terminally-flawed microstamping technology/concept is one specific stimulus to new revolver introduction in weird places like CA.

Revolvers are exempted from this utopian and impractical legal requirement, since they do not litter crime scenes with automatically ejected spent brass after each shot. The selection of new revolvers in my state has become more abundant than current-production autoloading pistols.


One less-stupid reason I happen to prefer revolvers over autos for carry purposes is because they are far easier to manage with just one hand. After shattering my left forearm in 2015, I was unable to perform clearance drills with my Glock 19 to my satisfaction, for a period of several months. It's do-able -- physically handicapped shooters manage this with style, usually with a special protuberance on the slide and lots of practice. However, I found loading and unloading a revolver one-handed to be way easier. BTW, moonclips really help with this.
 
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A question:
1) do you believe the Snubby/Revolver is regaining popularity-?

Observation:
1) Companies, such as Kimber and others- have entered this marketplace
There must be a projected significant profit potential
2) Notice an increase in revolver coverage via the different social media and written gun devoted sites

Your thoughts and observations-?

Thank you
The venerable small-framed snub revolver has been enjoying increasing demand and popularity since the latter part of the 90's. Again. In recent years more makers have been answering the growing demand with more models.

Now that social media has dramatically overtaken print media in dispensing information and knowledge, and covering interest of such things, newer gun owners are able to learn about the attributes of small-framed revolvers even faster than previous generations of gun owners.

While I've long been a revolver owner and shooter, and owned some 5-shot snubs from the 70's and 80's, it wasn't until the end of the 90's that I developed a lot more interest in them, meaning seeing the value of them as off-duty weapons and for some plainclothes applications. As the 2000's rolled along, I added a few more models to my EDC options.

Nowadays the 5-shot S&W J-frame, in one version or another, is my most common retirement CCW choice.

Yes, I still work to maintain familiarity and skill in shooting them by taking at least one of them to most range sessions. The little snubs tend to require more of the shooter than medium and full-size revolvers. TANSTAAFL.
 
Most carrier folks don't train at all, so the difficulty of shooting snubbies doesn't matter as they don't really shoot them - beside maybe once at the square range close up. Real snubby fans train with them.

The interesting thing will be if the 6 shot 32s make a real dent in the 5 shot market. Then there are a few fans of the 22 LR and Mags - that's a tad light for my taste and usually an even worse trigger.
 
I'd say 95% of gun owners never heard of .32. It seems like a nitch for older revolver owners. Ammo is expensive, there aren't a lot of ammo options available, and most LGS and pawn shops don't carry it. I doubt .32 will ever replace 38spc and 357mag anytime soon, if ever.

I don't believe that revolvers, especially small subnose revolvers, have ever NOT been popular. It's just that small semiautos have sold a LOT more, so everyone falsely equates that to revolver sales having fallen off or declined when they have not. They’ve almost tripled compared to decades ago.
 
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I'd say 95% of gun owners never heard of .32. It seems like a nitch for older revolver owners. Ammo is expensive, there aren't a lot of ammo options available, and most LGS and pawn shops don't carry it. I doubt .32 will ever replace 38spc and 357mag anytime soon, if ever.

I don't believe that revolvers, especially small subnose revolvers, have ever NOT been popular. It's just that small semiautos have sold a LOT more, so everyone falsely equates that to revolver sales having fallen off or declined when they have not. They’ve almost tripled compared to decades ago.
Similarly, I'd estimate that 95% of gun owners are generally clueless about guns in general.
 
The 32 ammo is expensive. I see Hornady 32 HR Mag at Cabelas. The practice ammo - the 32 Longs are hard to find - usually on line. If you do get a 327 mag - they are something of a beast in J frame. BOOOOOOM! With some real recoil. Takes a touch of practice.

But the Taurus 85 crowd - it's cheap and fits in my wife's purse probably won't ever notice the guns.
 
I dont think they ever really lost popularity, especially with with shooters who came up with them, but I think reality and practicality also had a way of relegating them lower down on the weapons of choice list, for more serious things.

And its not that the revolvers arent up to it, just that they tend to require more from the shooter, and more often, especially if things get the least bit complicated.

And I agree with GEM, if you're going to use one, you need to train regularly with them, as you do with anything else. But even more so with the lighter, Airweight type guns using full power ammo.

As far as revolvers go, the snubbies were always my revolver soft spot, followed by the 4" guns. Never got the point of the longer barrel guns.
 
Post #7 by Shanghai McCoy pretty much sums it up...arthritis. It runs rampant in my wife's family. Both my wife and her sister want me to teach them some things about handguns. I personally carry a S&W model 36 (not cheap). They both told me that "they want like one like you carry". They both have difficulty in cocking an auto. The old roll your shoulder does help but arthritis attacks those joints too. They are both the type who that if they cant do it comfortably, they aren't doing it.Plus they think "the little gun is cute".
 
Little 38 snubbies are priced right, and sized right.

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some other things I like

1) Simple to operate. No flippers, levers, buttons to push. Revolvers are very intuitive.

2) it is a lot harder to shoot your self with a double action revolver than some striker fired pistol.
 
With the arthritis in both my wrists I am finding it harder to manually operate the slides on my semi auto pistols.
That's the main reason that revolvers are working better for me these days in my new found decrepitude.
You got it just right Shanghai...though it will take years for some of the younger brethren to come to grips with that nemesis of the shooting fraternity.

But a .32 of any shape or form, is a caliber from the last century and will do nothing that a .38 special or light load 9mm won't do better. I'm a .32 fan, big time, in revolvers but I do question its viability as a defense round...speaking of any .32 load EXCEPT the .327 fire breathers. As a CC caliber, and in my own prejudiced mind, it ranks above the various .22's for sure, but does not have the potential that a .38 Spl or 9mm possesses.

Styx said it well, "I'd say 95% of gun owners never heard of .32. It seems like a nitch for older revolver owners. Ammo is expensive, there aren't a lot of ammo options available, and most LGS and pawn shops don't carry it. I doubt .32 will ever replace 38spc and 357mag anytime soon, if ever."

All of my blather and I admit to being an admitted admirer of the .32 Long and H&R, notwithstanding, Slamfire's post #14 above is on the mark as well, "Little 38 snubbies are priced right, and sized right.".

Here's one of mine, in 38 New Police (same as .38 S&W) by Colt, their Police Positive model from before the war. The group was shot Weaver Stance from 7 yds and was five not six shots with ammunition from the late 1930's. My Uncle Bill's Bethleham Steel gate guard piece, it came to me when he passed. At ~21 oz, it's one of several 'walk the dog tonight' handguns I tote along our farm road. I have another with a small NY town's PD stamp on it...it's in .32 Long and that one gets a stroll from time to time as well. They're fun, accurate but not true defensive weapons, I'd Opine. YMMv of course Rod


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Revolver are SO NOT cool anymore! Especially old one, full of problems and rust and even Boomers don’t want them!

Get a Nice Glock in 9mm and your set for LIFE!

Don’t buy these Old Outdated Classics. Not Worth it! and they Are EXPENSIVe … So do your part and DON’t BUY CLASSIC Smiths or Colts!

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For our Concealed Handgun License we had to show proficiency at the range. Out of the 50+ shooters, 6 had revolvers, including a vintage Colt Python. And I was one of the 6 and had the only single action out there. But that was several years ago. But I still think the popularity of revolvers is higher than those numbers show.
 
A question:
1) do you believe the Snubby/Revolver is regaining popularity-?

Yes.

Because everybody already has eleventeen UGLY Glocks.

Even the SOUND a Glock makes when dry-firing is unappealing.
Dare I say even REVOLTING.
The dry-fire sound of a Glock is reminiscent of the noise a cheap ball-point pen makes when the stylus isn't fully locked, and pressure is applied to the stylus, causing the stylus to retract unexpectedly into the body of the pen.

Compare that sad sound of the Glock to the gloriously-appealing sound of a Peacemaker or a Three-Screw Ruger being cocked.

And revolvers in general are much more appealing simply to look at.

Yet I will admit that I generally CARRY one of those UGLY semi-autos.
Those ugly semi-autos took over, because there is no denying that the ugly semi-autos do what they are intended to do quite well.

That doesn't mean that as a HOBBYIST, and as one who appreciates the beauty of revolvers, I can't collect revolvers simply because I like the enjoyment of looking at them and handling them. There is nothing about handling a Glock that gives me any of the satisfaction such as I get when handling a revolver.

And maybe I'm just old.

But I don't expect I will EVER handl the trigger module of a SIG P-365, and think to myself, "This thing is gorgeous. The guy who builit it was a true artist." Nope that thing is about as sexy as a staple gun.

Enjoy your revolvers.
 
Yes.

Because everybody already has eleventeen UGLY Glocks.

Even the SOUND a Glock makes when dry-firing is unappealing.
Dare I say even REVOLTING.
The dry-fire sound of a Glock is reminiscent of the noise a cheap ball-point pen makes when the stylus isn't fully locked, and pressure is applied to the stylus, causing the stylus to retract unexpectedly into the body of the pen.

Compare that sad sound of the Glock to the gloriously-appealing sound of a Peacemaker or a Three-Screw Ruger being cocked.

And revolvers in general are much more appealing simply to look at.

Yet I will admit that I generally CARRY one of those UGLY semi-autos.
Those ugly semi-autos took over, because there is no denying that the ugly semi-autos do what they are intended to do quite well.

That doesn't mean that as a HOBBYIST, and as one who appreciates the beauty of revolvers, I can't collect revolvers simply because I like the enjoyment of looking at them and handling them. There is nothing about handling a Glock that gives me any of the satisfaction such as I get when handling a revolver.

And maybe I'm just old.

But I don't expect I will EVER handl the trigger module of a SIG P-365, and think to myself, "This thing is gorgeous. The guy who builit it was a true artist." Nope that thing is about as sexy as a staple gun.

Enjoy your revolvers.

LOL. Only problem dryfiring (and shooting) the SA's is, its a lot harder for the older shooters to hold that heavy gun up and hold that sight alignment, all the while waiting for that slow-motion hammer fall. One or two "clicks/bangs" and they gotta sit down and hit the inhaler. :rofl:

No doubt the old school revolvers are pretty to look at and fondle, and a lot of fun to shoot. The thought of one spending the summer under a shirt and working outdoors in sunny and sultry 95° weather, in a leather holster seems almost criminal. Same goes for those pretty Colt blue 1911's. o_O :)

Yea, enjoy your revolvers, and leave the ugly stuff to the ugly guns. :)
 
Yes.

Because everybody already has eleventeen UGLY Glocks.

Even the SOUND a Glock makes when dry-firing is unappealing.
Dare I say even REVOLTING.
The dry-fire sound of a Glock is reminiscent of the noise a cheap ball-point pen makes when the stylus isn't fully locked, and pressure is applied to the stylus, causing the stylus to retract unexpectedly into the body of the pen.

Compare that sad sound of the Glock to the gloriously-appealing sound of a Peacemaker or a Three-Screw Ruger being cocked.

And revolvers in general are much more appealing simply to look at.

Yet I will admit that I generally CARRY one of those UGLY semi-autos.
Those ugly semi-autos took over, because there is no denying that the ugly semi-autos do what they are intended to do quite well.

That doesn't mean that as a HOBBYIST, and as one who appreciates the beauty of revolvers, I can't collect revolvers simply because I like the enjoyment of looking at them and handling them. There is nothing about handling a Glock that gives me any of the satisfaction such as I get when handling a revolver.

And maybe I'm just old.

But I don't expect I will EVER handl the trigger module of a SIG P-365, and think to myself, "This thing is gorgeous. The guy who builit it was a true artist." Nope that thing is about as sexy as a staple gun.

Enjoy your revolvers.
Shooting a Glock is as fun as riding the Bus during rush hour. Not fun but you should learn to run one and shoot it good. It’s the most popular gun even, and changes are you will run into one.
 
The high cost of ammo may had something to do with it. Every simple pull of the trigger and you kept on blasting away with an auto until it was empty. The same was actually true with a revolver but you had more time to "come to your senses" while reloading.
 
For our Concealed Handgun License we had to show proficiency at the range. Out of the 50+ shooters, 6 had revolvers, including a vintage Colt Python. And I was one of the 6 and had the only single action out there. But that was several years ago. But I still think the popularity of revolvers is higher than those numbers show.
I think revolvers are a tool that most people carry as backup, in a carry rotation, for outdoorsmen activities, or just shoot at the range only. It's not a lot of people's one and only. I EDC a J-frames as a BUG or a L-frame as a primary on a regular basis, but I EDC a semiauto more and I own more semiautos because they're less expensive. With that said, I most likely wouldn't have choosen to take a revolver for a training class or a CHL class either even though I own them and regularly carry them....

I can buy a duty grade respectable polymer frame semiautos from a $350-$550. Most revolvers starts at $550-$1100+. If the opposite was true, I'd own more Smith, Ruger, and Colt revolvers than semiautos.
 
I do think that more people are getting into revolvers, at least in my age group. I am 39, and didn't own one until a few years ago. I only bought one then because the 357 looked great on paper and I kept hearing the folks with much more experience than I talking them up. A bit of reading and research led to admiration, then eyeballing, then shopping. I ended up with a new blued 5" GP100 and it has been love since first fondling. I love the mechanics of a revolver and the solidity of them. Got a friend on board, too. Something to be said for simplicity as well.
 
I think that the number of enthusiasts that own multiple hand guns has greatly increased in the past few decades... with the Internet being a primary reason for this increase.

As enthusiasts grow their collection they naturally want to also experience the intricacies of a revolver... hence a natural increase of revolver purchases to go along with the increase of all handgun purchases.

There will always be the "revolvers only" guys but I believe the increase in revolvers is mainly due to the "I want to also have a revolver" guys.

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As far as an increase in snub nose revolvers that are actually carried? I highly doubt that 90% of all concealed carry handguns are actually carried more than 10 days a year.
 
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