Sako Riihimaki

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Ravinsomniac, Sep 21, 2015.

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  1. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    I have a Sako rifle in .222 that I picked up about 10 years ago, but never shot it. I recently was looking at ammo prices. WOW.
    The original owner shot just one box of bullets thru it and it's in pretty good shape.
    Would it be possible to rechamber it to shoot military .223?
    Would it devalue the gun by doing so?
    :confused:
     
  2. gunnerh

    gunnerh Member

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    If you rechamber to .223 you devalue the collector price but there are few Sako collectors, there are more Sako shooters. I have rechambered two .222's a savage 24 O/U and Remington 600 mohawk. I am happy with both as shooters with 50-55 grain ammo. With heavier weights not so much. Mileage may vary.
     
  3. Jackal

    Jackal Member

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    I'm guessing the twist rate is 1:14? If so, it will limit bullet selection significantly.
     
  4. natman

    natman Member

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    Yes and Yes.

    If you rechamber to 223, the rifling twist rate used for 222 will limit you to 50-55 grain bullets. Bullets much heavier than that won't stabilize.

    Resale will be less and the markings on the barrel will have to be restamped. Personally, I'd sell it to someone who reloads who'll be delighted with it as it is and buy a 223 for yourself.
     
  5. ewlyon

    ewlyon Member

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    Prvi Partizan ammo is available on midway right now for about $11 for 20 rounds.
     
  6. Bullet Bob

    Bullet Bob Member

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    The .222 is a wonderful round. You could probably sell yours for enough to buy a .223.
     
  7. Offfhand

    Offfhand Member

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    There is a large and very active worldwide association of SAKO collectors. (sakocollectors.com) Visit their website and you'll be overwhelmed with information about your rifle. One thing you will quickly learn is that you do NOT want to rechamber your rifle or alter it in any way. SAKOs in .222 caliber are especially accurate and desirable.
     
  8. Hook67

    Hook67 Member

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    Ravin, I have exactly what you're talking about. Handled an estate for a friend several years ago that included a completely disassembled L46. We scratched around and found enuf parts to reassemble the thing with a few mods, but then discovered it had been rechambered to .223 Rem without remarking the bbl.

    Didn't bother me, because I was set up for both calibers and the rifle was in too rough a shape to be very valuable. But, it turned out to be as accurate as any rifle I own. Half inch groups are fairly common and I'm no benchrest shooter.

    However, 55 gr bullets are the heaviest I've been able to get to group. Hornady 60 gr bullets aren't accurate, 45 gr TSXs shoot great but 53 gr TSXs don't, and, just for the heck of it, I tried Speer 70 gr and they were awful.

    I would never rechamber a fine example of this beauty. Value would suffer and you would not realize much gain in performance. If I liked this rifle enough, I'd scrounge up 222 ammo and use it. If I wanted to shoot a lot, I'd sell this L46 and buy a 223. I suspect you'd end up with enough extra cash to buy a load of ammo. But that is my opinion. The rifle is yours and you need to do what you are led to do with it.
     
  9. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Is it an L46 - detachable magazine, boxy bolt sleeve with safety; or an L461 with Mauser type magazine, streamlined bolt sleeve, and safety on the receiver?

    If an L46, Frank DeHaas says it should not be rechambered for .222 Magnum. Magazine, ejection port, and bolt travel are not long enough. He did not mention .223, but I would not push it, the difference in maximum OAL is only .02".

    If an L461, they were factory made for .222 Magnum and .223 and should handle the conversion.

    Resale value will be greatly reduced.
     
  10. Jackal

    Jackal Member

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    Why bother rechambering it? Any accurate, quality .223 ammo is going to cost about the same amount. If you handload for accuracy, the only price difference is the brass.

    Just sell it and buy a .223.
     
  11. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    I will definitely keep it the way it is and probably trade it for something else of equal value. Thank you for all of your replies. After going to sakocollectors.com, I've found out it is an early L46 with a rare wooden stock made in that time period.
     
  12. horsemen61

    horsemen61 Member

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    Pics please
     
  13. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    20150926_101835_zpspwwt98ua.jpg
     
  14. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    The butt pad says,
    "WHITE LINE"
    NO SLIP BUTT PAD
    Mershon Co.

    20150926_101726%201_zpsfgrvvtso.jpg
     
  15. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    There are a few small dents and scrapes on the wood stock, but it's not too bad for a half century of being moved around. I think the inlays give it character.
    20150926_101740_zpsqkm81lmy.jpg
     
  16. murf

    murf Member

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    glad you decided to keep that fine rifle in its original condition. i'm sure more than a few members here would be glad to work a trade with you if you decide to sell it.

    murf
     
  17. Takem406

    Takem406 Member

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    No no no no! Don't trash that perfectly good triple duce! My grandpa passed down to me the same rifle. Ammo isn't that expensive and it's very cheap to load. That rifle is very accurate! Actually I prefer it to the 223. Another thing is that barrel is a 1-14. Most 223`s are a 1-9 to a 1-7. That barrel is made for 55 grains and under. Actually mine loves 40's! Keep it as is or sell it. Then buy a 223/5.56. I smoked a yote with the factory Hornady loads this spring. Very effective without destroying the hide.
     
  18. Ravinsomniac

    Ravinsomniac Member

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    It's not that I really wanted a .223.
    Not knowing what I had, I thought the more common military round might be less expensive to shoot in large quantities at the range, that's why I questioned about the change.
    Since I may keep it, can anyone suggest a good 200-400 yard scope for it, without breaking the bank?
     
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