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Same plane sights on AR15

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Parallax, Mar 28, 2012.

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  1. Parallax

    Parallax Member

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    How do same plane iron sights differ from the regular iron sights on an AR15? What are their advantages and disadvantages?
     
  2. NeuseRvrRat

    NeuseRvrRat Member

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  3. minutemen1776

    minutemen1776 Member

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    The two peep apertures on standard A2 sights are offset, which means that one aperture will not shoot to the same point of impact as the other at a given distance. I suppose the greatest benefit of this is that the shooter can flip to the smaller aperture (which shoots higher) at longer ranges without having to otherwise adjust for elevation. The downside is simply that the apertures don't share the same point of impact. Since I seldom (or never actually) shoot an extended ranges with my AR, I don't like having different points of impact with the two apertures. I'd simply like to have two aperture sizes on the same plane. Unfortunately, same-plane sights/apertures are not very prevalent. Troy sights are usually same-plane, and Ashley makes a (rather expensive) same-plane replacement aperture that is good. Larue also offers its fixed BUIS with the Ashley aperture already installed.
     
  4. Parallax

    Parallax Member

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    So it sounds like whether or not this is beneficial is dependent on how you zero your rifle, correct?
     
  5. minutemen1776

    minutemen1776 Member

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    I guess you could say that. In my case, though, it's more about how I actually USE the rifle. Since I don't shoot at extended ranges, I have little use for a different aperture that shoots higher. Consequently, I prefer the simplicity of same-plane sights.
     
  6. Andrew Wyatt

    Andrew Wyatt Member

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    Same plane sights make sense if you're using an A2 or other elevation adjustable sight base.

    if you are using an A1 style base, stick with the non same plane sights.
     
  7. henschman

    henschman Member

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    On the regular GI aperture, the large aperture is 2 MOA lower than the small one. That means if you zero the small aperture at 25/300m, the large one will be zeroed at 50/200m.

    With a same plane aperture, the big and small apertures are the same height, and so they will both be zeroed at the same distance. Whether it is an advantage or a disadvantage depends on the use.

    If your use simply requires hits on man-sized targets at typical engagement ranges, the GI setup is probably preferable since it allows you to quickly switch between your near and far zeroes depending on the situation, and since you probably wouldn't want to use the small aperture at close range anyway.

    For competition shooting, where you might have to shoot a match that has a stage with a little bit of precision shooting and a little bit of speed shooting, all at close range, you might want to be able to flip apertures in the middle of a stage, all while keeping the same zero. Also, you will generally know the layout of a stage before you shoot it, so you will be able to set your zero beforehand based on what the stage requires.
     
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