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sending ammo to Manhattan

Discussion in 'Legal' started by chutestrate, Jan 29, 2013.

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  1. chutestrate

    chutestrate Member

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    Am I able to do it. I spent a couple of hours looking on line and found many different opinions but no answers. Called atf in ny and was referred to nypd. At least atf admitted they didn't know. Nypd didn't know either. I politely thanked them for their time.

    Reason I am asking is because I sold some ammo through an auction site. I didn't receive the buyer's address until he sent payment. I asked for it ahead of time but he didn't send it. I included shipping in my asking price so I wasn't worried about it. When I received payment the address is in Manhattan. I really don't know if I can ship ammo to him. If I can't find a definitive answer I think I'll return payment with a big apology.
     
  2. akv3g4n

    akv3g4n Member

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    With the current climate and lack a an acceptable answer from law enforcement, I would agree that you should apologize and return the funds and not complete the transaction. You don't want to be the one that they make an example of. Too many questions right now.
     
  3. inclinebench

    inclinebench Member

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    I may be paranoid, but I would be afraid I was being set up like a bowling pin. I live in VA and Bloomberg has sent undercover buyers down here just so he could sue gun shops.

    I would be polite, but certainly refuse to send ammo, and just send his money back.
     
  4. hnk45acp

    hnk45acp Member

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    Ammo can be shipped to NYC until the new law is in place
     
  5. mbogo

    mbogo Member

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    Send it via common carrier. Put the recipient's address as the return address, and pay cash.

    mbogo
     
  6. LemmyCaution

    LemmyCaution Member

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    You would not be violating federal, nor PA law by doing this. You'd likely not be violating NY State law (until their new law goes into effect), nor NYC law, either.

    NYC law prohibits any person from possessing ammunition, unless such person has a NYC permit to own a firearm, and the ammunition is in the caliber of the firearm they are permitted for.

    There is no law on the books in NYC prohibiting the shipment of ammunition into NYC from elsewhere.

    All that said, NYPD has entire departments dedicated to all sorts of extralegal shenanigans, such as aggressively attempting to frame people for firearms trafficking.

    Assume risk according to your own judgement, or that of your legal counsel.
     
  7. Matthew Temkin

    Matthew Temkin Member

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    N.Y.C. fire code prevents us from having more than 200 rounds of ammo in our
    homes. I do know that quite a few sellers--among them Cheaper Than Dirt--stopped mail order ammo sales to NYC years ago.
    Be very careful.
     
  8. kcgunesq

    kcgunesq Member

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    Interesting. So if 5 college grad students all live together and each has a gun, as permitted by Heller/McDonald, does each one have to get an inventory of all of the other resident's ammo before deciding if they can buy a box? If three already have 50 round boxes of pistol ammo, does that mean that the other two can only have one 20 round box? If the combined total goes over 200, who is liable? All? The one whose purchase put them over the limit? What if student one has 200 rounds, can NYC really prohibit students 2-5 from having any ammo? I don't think so.

    While some limit may well be constitutional, I can't believe it would be so low. Especially since there is very strong evidence of no substantial risk to firefighters or neighbors in the event of a fire.
     
  9. joeschmoe

    joeschmoe Member

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    That's behind enemy lines. Best to use Special Forces to parachute in supplies.
     
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