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Shooting low

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by stampederunner, Mar 20, 2011.

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  1. stampederunner

    stampederunner Member

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    I'm still pretty new to shooting handguns (400-500 rounds total) and I have a problem with shooting low. I have tried tilting my wrist more upward, but I loose a lot of accuracy that way. I usually just compensate by aiming at the top of the target and my shots end up in the general area of the bullseye. Any suggestins or tips I can try so that I can break this bad habit? I should also add that I have the same problem no matter what I'm shooting. I have shot 5 dfferent guns all in 9mm and have the same problems.
     
  2. jawn

    jawn Member

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    You're flinching. Have a buddy load a few snap caps into a few magazines and you'll see it.
     
  3. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer member

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    As above, you're flinching and every shot you take ingrains it further into your muscle memory. Buy a .22 (or a conversion unit) and shoot about 5000 rounds, then think about picking up your carry gun again.
     
  4. Scuba_Steve

    Scuba_Steve Member

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    I too am new to shooting and have the same problem. I picked up a new .22 Ruger MKIII yesterday and it has made a significant difference after two days of shooting. Shooting the .22 my shots are spot on.

    Moreover, when I went back to a larger caliber, I am more aware of when I flinch. I haven't completely corrected it, but it is definitely helping.
     
  5. jbr

    jbr Member

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    Anticipation likely a factor also - causes you to push down on the pistol just before firing - practice will help - if your gun is DA or has a long trigger pull that can contribute to the issue - try using the pad of your finger or the first knuckle - see which helps/hurts the problem
     
  6. Strahley

    Strahley Member

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    Like others said, you're anticipating recoil and flinching...in this case, you're pushing forward right before the gun recoils. Also as others said, buy a quality .22LR (Buck Mark or a Ruger) and shoot that thing A LOT. Learn trigger discipline. Only your trigger finger should move before the gun fires...your hands should remain still

    Proper trigger mechanics will transfer over to everything. Shooting a single action .22LR will help you shoot everything else better, even double action or striker fired guns
     
  7. ATBackPackin

    ATBackPackin Member

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    If I am having a problem I will print some of these and use them as targets.

    Shawn
     

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  8. 1SOW

    1SOW Member

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    In addition to shooting a .22, load a couple (or more) snap caps in two mags (or more) and shuffle them behind your back until you don't know where the snap caps are. When you hit the snap cap, you'll clearly SEE the barrel dip.

    Dry fire a lot, concentrating on keeping the barrel as motionless as possible while smoothly pressing the trigger. Also do this at the range before you shoot, and again if you find yourself anticipating the recoil with live rounds.

    You have to keep doing all these to "unlearn" the bad habit you've gotten into.

    AtBackPackin, I've used the charts, but never as as an actual target. That's a cool idea!
     
  9. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator

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    The good thing is that you're consistent with it across multiple platforms (it narrows the cause down to you), the bad thing is that you are flinching and reinforcing it every time you shoot.

    Before you even consider buying another gun, get yourself some proper instruction in grip stance and trigger control. It takes a lot of rounds ($$$) to break bad habits and the cost of a class will save you a lot of money in the long run...it would even be worth it to sell a gun to attend a class
     
  10. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    Get yourself some snap caps (my favs a-zoom) and practice your trigger pull and follow through. That's likely the culprit.
     
  11. Smaug

    Smaug Member

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    Yeah, it is flinching.

    I'll admit that it takes all my mental effort not to flinch when I shoot 45. With 22 I'm OK. 9 mm, I'm OK. Even with 44 Magnum, I seem to be OK.

    The snap cap idea is a good one. Load the magazine with a few snap caps so you see when you flinch.

    Another thing to keep in mind when you practice (at least for targets) the goal is for the gun firing to SURPRISE YOU. You should be gradually squeezing the trigger straight back until it breaks, goes boom, and surprises you.
     
  12. cactusgeorge

    cactusgeorge Member

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    LOTS of DRY PRACTICE, DRY PRACTICE, DRY PRACTICE...!!!
     
  13. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator

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    The problem with this is if you are practicing incorrectly, you are just ingraining bad habits. You need to learn the correct method, before practice helps you improve
     
  14. rellascout

    rellascout member

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    You mean incorrectly.... ;)

    Get some training or at least get a more experienced shooter to go with you to the range watch you shoot and help correct what you are doing. Correct is now so you do not develop more bad habits.
     
  15. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator

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    Yes I did, typing too fast and not proof reading again...I corrected it
     
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