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Similar bullets, similar powders?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Mose, Oct 29, 2009.

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  1. Mose

    Mose Member

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    Oct 29, 2009
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    Location:
    Iron Curtain, Northern AZ
    I see recipes at Alliant that I'm interested in but they are using Speer bullets...would not the same recipe apply to the same style and weight in a Hornady?
    Also: Seeing as IMR and Hodgdon are the same company, are not their versions of 4227 the same and interchangeable?
    Thanks,
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    H427 and IMR4227 used to be slightly different powders using different data.

    No problem now as Hodgdon discontinued H4227 a couple years ago, or longer.

    Data can be used with a different brand bullet as long as you start at a starting load and work up.
    In the case of the Alliant data listed by Hodgdon now, most of the time, no starting load is shown.
    Just reduce the max load shown by 10% and work up, watching for any signs of excess pressure.

    You should be doing that with any powder anyway.

    rc
     
  3. ~z

    ~z Member

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    Location:
    High plains of Texas
    bullets of the same type and weight may be interchanged but the powders...treat them as separate regardless if the names rhyme.

    Welcome aboard.
    ~z
     
  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Differences in bullet hardness and bearing surface can have an effect on chamber pressure and maximum loads. That is the reason for all the boring fine print in the book about "starting loads" and "working up."

    As I understand it, originally, H4227 was made in Australia, IMR 4227 was made in Canada; not the same stuff. But a couple of years ago, they went to labeling the Australian product as IMR and dropped the H number. Confusing, eh?
    I would read the label and look in the load data.
     
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