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Stock Restoration Know-How Wanted

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by SgtMAjB, Nov 28, 2006.

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  1. SgtMAjB

    SgtMAjB Member

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    I know there's great restoration guidance out there to help me out with my desire to put a great look on my inherited 1931 Win Model 12 Pump. I'd love to make the wood sing in honor of my Dad. The barrel is perfect and I don't want to touch the bluing it's fine and anything less than a factory level finish looks shoddy at best. But I'm an avid woodworker who understands wood and I know to ask from experienced/successful restorers as to what is the best method to strip then the best finish to apply to the stock and forearm. If you've done it and done it well please send me a tip or two. I love this gun. Thank you.
     
  2. Dienekes

    Dienekes Member

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    I wouldn't presume to advise on a Winchester restoration, but some years ago I did some "conservation" on various museum Winchesters. Details escape me at the moment but of course Winchester had specific finishes and techniques which varied somewhat over time.

    Suggest you do some inquiry along those lines before you do something you may regret. "The Winchester Book" by Madis may have something on that. There are, I believe, two Winchester collecting associations. The museum at Cody may be able to steer you as well.
     
  3. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    SgtMAjB, wood is wood. I'm guessing the stock is walnut. Take the stock off and use the same products and techniques you use on fine furniture. A hand rubbed oil finish comes to mind. Tung oil is favourite of mine.
    With your woodworking skills, you could likely give us more tips than we could ever give you about finishing wood. If there's any checkering, though, use a toothbrush.
     
  4. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    My son just bought a WWII Mosin Nagant and the stock was a total mess. I sanded it down, rubbed a little stain on it and gave it 3 coats of Tung oil. It looks as good as the day it was issued.

    I don't know if you will trash the value of an old Winchester by doing the stock over but I'm guessing you will. Remember, they don't make them anymore. You may just want to clean up the stock a little and rub some Linseed oil on it so as not to remove or change the old finish. I did the Mosin Nagant over because it has no value as a collectors piece.
     
  5. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    If you must refinish it, have a look through the Brownell's site and Midway's. There are different stains that claim to be correct, but I don't have the knowledge to tell you which one matches which years and which models.

    Having said all that, here's a kit that says it's good for pre-64 Winchesters:

    www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=160127
     
  6. Khornet

    Khornet Member

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    Check Brownells

    for the Pilkington oil finishes. I've used their "Red-Brown" a number of times. The stuff comes with a detailed pamphlet of instructions which are useful for any wood finishing project but especially for gunstocks. This is a real oil finish, handsome and durable, and I think that color was developed particularly to give a finish like the old Winchesters. I don't mean the stains, but the finishes.
     
  7. dfaugh

    dfaugh Member

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    Roger that. I use the same techniques I would when refinishing furniture. And I like Tung Oil ALOT, although it takes a bit of work, it gives an incredible final finish.
     
  8. U.S.SFC_RET

    U.S.SFC_RET Member

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    I tried a slew of various techniques found over the internet to "deep clean and revitalize" wood but those shortcuts didn't work out for me. When it come right down to it the longer way works. Use your proven stripper for walnut. I prefer a liquid stripper. Use 000 steel wool to go lightly over the stock. Danish oil dark walnut works great for winchester stocks for me. Let dry thoroughly. Steel wool. Formby's tung oil finish low gloss works for me, one layer and let dry for one to three days depending on the humidity and steel wool with 000 steel wool and apply a second layer. How much you want it to shine depends on how many layers you want to put on.
     
  9. MountainBear

    MountainBear Member

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    I just refinished a stock with velvet-oil. It turned out with a beautiful soft sheen to it that really makes the grain in the wood pop out. It will take lots of patience, lots of coats. Resist the urge to spray the stock or dip in finish. All hand rubbed coats. I'mnot sure what I used to seal the grain first, but you need to do it. Then hand mud rub velvet oil into the stock with 320 wet/dry sandpaper wrapped arround a pink rubber eraser. A couple of applications, then switch to 400 grit. Once you get the coat even and all the grains filled and sludge off, give it a few hand rubs. Just a dot will cover a large area. Rub it with your hand to get it warmed up and get it a nice even coat. No ridges or thick spots. A few more hand rubbed coats and it should turn out beautiful. Just go slow and allow at least 24 hours between coats...
    Good luck.
     
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