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tending the bore

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by thomis, Jan 24, 2012.

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  1. thomis

    thomis Member

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    I've been shooting all my life but sometimes I feel like I've missed a few fundamentals along the way. I just received a new rifle and I really want to do things right.
    I have a standard cleaning rod, brushes, patches, etc. I don't have a bore guide and I think it may be a good idea. I've been cleaning rifles before wondering if I was doing damage to the chamber or crown. How many of you use a bore guide? Do you have a favorite brand?
    What are some other tips you can share on rifle cleaning, more specifically, the bore?

    Also I haven't shot it yet and I need to get a "copper solvent". Can someone recommend a good brand?
     
  2. Murphys Law

    Murphys Law Member

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    I've used a Dewey bore guide for years and its worked well. These are available from Midway. I looked at the Tipton bore guide kit and that seems to be more universal but have no actual experience with that brand. The solvents that work for me are Shooters Choice bore cleaner and Kroil. When you say standard cleaning rod, Do you mean a one piece stainless steel rod or one of those aluminum rods that are in sections that have to be screwed together?
     
  3. StretchNM

    StretchNM Member

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    I don;t think you'll hurt the crown much unless you're cleaning from the muzzle end and you mess up.

    Bore guides are good. I use them on all my rifles that allow it. I'm also a fan of barrel break-in procedures.
     
  4. maskedman504

    maskedman504 Member

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    In the same boat as thomis here; I always feel like I am going to damage something jamming that brass brush down the muzzle of my guns. I have a complete set of different caliber brushes, but it just feels counter intuitive. I am a self taught shooter- my Dad had alot of guns growing up but they just sat in a safe. If we did go out to shoot, I was the one to figure out how to take down the guns and clean them all.

    I have had several brass cleaning rods break when cleaning a barrel- can brass rods damage a barrel? I have tried aluminum rods also, but they don't seem any more sturdy.

    I use Hoppe's #9 and Rem Oil mainly. Wipe down all the components etc. I just have a tricky time with the barrels. Like cleaning my SKS- okay, use the .30 cal brass brush; way too tight. So I switched to the .357mag brush- I thought 7.62 is a .30 cal bullett? The .357 mag brush should be larger than the .30 cal brush surely... I have been using .410 to clean .45 LC because the other brush seems to large as well. Am I being overly cautious? Also, is there a cleaning set you can get for <$100 that is high quality? I think part of my problem is buying cheapo $20 cleaning kits..

    I just got a pair of nice 1911s for Christmas and would prefer not to jack them up.

    I guess the bottom line is, can brass brushes damage barrels and is it normal to use some force to work the brush up and down the barrel?
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  5. Murphys Law

    Murphys Law Member

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    I've had few cheap cleaning rods bend at the joints as well. Try a one-piece stainless steel cleaning rod from Dewey or Kleen-Bore. It will last you a lifetime. Measure the barrel and action length and combine for the length of the rod. Also make allowance for your handle. I use a 44 inch KLeen-Bore rod for 24" inch barreled bolt rifles and also use a 36" one for the shorter rifles.

    Probably better to make your own kit to suit your own needs than to use some cheaper Universal kit. I use an old fishing tackle box filled with an assortment of brushes, jags, tips, muzzle guards, bore guides, toothbrushes, patches, etc. and its just a collection of stuff I've found to work over the years.

    As to the brushes, Never reverse direction in the bore. Just push it completely out past the muzzle. Remove the brush (should only be finger tight) and then remove the rod. Don't draw the brush backwards through the bore as that can also damage the crown at the muzzle (over time). Reattach the brush and start another pass from the breech end. Hope this helps :)
     
  6. DoubleMag

    DoubleMag Member

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    New rifle... I strongly suggest fire lapping that bore after your break in. I also suggest going one over on your brush size for break in and definately if you fire lap; if a 223 use a 243 brush, 270 use a 30 etc



    good luck!
     
  7. The Sarge

    The Sarge Member

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    With JB Bore Paste and my Copper Cleaner (w/Ammonia and Soap) I reverse directions with the bore brush numerous times.
     
  8. Nico Testosteros

    Nico Testosteros Member

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    I use a carbon fiber cleaning rod with bore guide and either CLP or Eezox for routine bore cleaning. I use Wipeout for copper removal. If putting acrifle away for awhile I make sure I Eezox the bore.
     
  9. Smokey Joe

    Smokey Joe Member

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    Cleaning the bore...

    Thomis--I've been cleaning firearms for quite a while now. I used to do it from the muzzle end because it was easier. Well, live and learn.

    Nowadays I use a bore guide (brand unimportant IMHO; they're all abt the same) and a Dewey coated one-piece cleaning rod. Wipe off the rod after each couple of passes through the bore.

    In a firearm which I MUST clean from the muzzle-end I use a rod guide that centers the rod down the bore. (I have such for my revolver and my muzzle-loader for example.)

    For a copper solvent, nothing beats the foaming bore cleaners IMHO. Just foam the bore full, wait 10-15 min, and patch it out. Comes out purple if it's getting any copper. However (there is always that darn "however"!) be careful of a false positive caused by brass brush or patch jag. I now use a plastic jag for just this occasion.

    When the foaming bore cleaners were new, at least to me, I cleaned, re-cleaned, swore and cleaned some more, using foaming bore cleaner and a brass brush. Purple, purple, purple. Grrr... Took about 1 1/2 hours of horsing around to realize that I was doing it to myself, over and over. Well, live and learn! :)
     
  10. IROCZ

    IROCZ Member

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    Always use a bore guide and Always clean from the breech whenever possible. It always concerned me to clean my M1A from the muzzle so I bought an Otis kit for that rifle.
     
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