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Thank you - i have purchased a 44

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Trent, Feb 5, 2013.

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  1. 98Redline

    98Redline Member

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    If you want to scope it, I would go for either the Ruger Super Blackhawk Bisley Hunter or a Super Redhawk. Both guns have integral scope mounts.

    The Bisley Hunter is my go to hunting gun and is capable of nearly minute of soda can accuracy with a 1x 4moa red dot and my hand loads.

    My Super Redhawk is in 480 Ruger (like Craigs above) and is simply a hammer. I am still in the process of getting it into hunting configuration, however it has been exceptionally accurate and is just a hoot to shoot. Recoil is...ummm...energetic.

    I am a Ruger guy through and through. Not that the Smith is a bad gun (I own quite a few), but the Rugers tend to be priced more competitively and are overall a stronger gun. If you are so inclined you can shoot full tilt top end 44mag loads through your Ruger all day long without any ill effects. If you run the same loads through the Smith on a regular basis you will end up with endshake problems and need to sent it off for repair.
     
  2. jr_watkins

    jr_watkins Member

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    Ruger Redhawk

    For handling the hot 44's, you'll appreciate the Ruger Redhawk. Even with wood grips, very comfortable.
     

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  3. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Can't believe it's been 7yrs since I paid that for one. The new ones will definitely be higher but since they're back in production, used prices should be reasonable. A new BFR will cost almost twice what I paid for my SRH. Although they are stronger and better built guns.


    Recoil is highly subjective. You'll simply have to try them to see what works best for you. What is comfortable to one is sheer terror to another. Very few have shot them all but I've shot most and tried custom grips of nearly every persuasion.


    The Super Blackhawk or Bisley Hunter models are ideal if you want to scope it. Here's Dad's Bisley .44 fitted with a Burris 2x and CLC stocks of macassar ebony.

    IMG_7808b.jpg
     
  4. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    That explains why I don't really enjoy shooting my 4" 629 with "full power" loads. I have Hogue grips on that revolver and the backstrap is fully exposed. After 12 rounds or so I'm done with it and I consider myself to be fairly tolerant of recoil.


    I agree ... but I only have two ... with sequential serial numbers.

    bh_bisley_01.jpg
     
  5. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    If you buy a Ruger I suggest you don't look at Bowen's website. I have a SRH, RH, two BHs, two GP100s and an SP101 and I could easily blow through my tax return with just a few clicks of the mouse.

    http://www.bowenclassicarms.com/catalog.html
     
  6. jr_watkins

    jr_watkins Member

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    1858...those are beautiful twins!
     
  7. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    Thanks ... I still get "giddy" just looking at them let alone shooting them. :D I need to complete the Power Custom conversion. I finished one and the results are well worth the money, time and effort.
     
  8. FM12

    FM12 Member

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    S&W for the win! Either model either barrel length. Cant go wrong either way.
     
  9. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    A Ruger Super Blackhawk is probably the least expensive and you'll probably shoot mostly single action anyway.
    If you reload, mild .44 Special stuff makes this handgun lots of fun.
    Hunting?
    I have killed 7 PA whitetails with my .44 using 240 grain Speer slugs.
    At REASONABLE ranges, the .44 Mag EQUALS the .30-30 in energy.
    My Ruger does not sport optics so I limit my shots on game to 50 yards or less.
     
  10. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Holy crap, I'm not going to lie, you guys are overwhelming me here!

    I haven't shot a really BIG handgun before. The biggest I've shot (I think) is my recent 357 magnum purchase, have no problem with it, not the slightest bit uncomfortable. I shoot around 500 or so 45 ACP a month, don't even notice the recoil from the 45 anymore.

    I know it's not an apples to apples comparison (shoulder vs. wrist), but my average trip to the rifle range involves some real heavy hitters (including my 50 BMG).

    Now, this being said, I can NOT handle a pistol grip shotgun shooting 3" magnum 00 buckshot. THAT crap just plain HURT when I tried it. (Shot from the hip, the recoil jammed my wrist)

    Where does the 44 mag stack against that? Or a 357 Mag?

    Need to make sure I'm not getting over my head here. I'm 180lb 6'1" so I think I'm sturdy enough for it. I do love big booms.

    I'd like to get the 44 mag over something "heavier" so I can (maybe) ween myself in to the really big guns (454 Casull, etc). Those have a particular interest to me too as I shoot 45 ACP and 45 Colt (have an old Armi Jager 45 Colt revolver, but I only shoot light loads from it).

    I've gathered so far from this thread that the Freedom Arms is the most inherently accurate.

    Is this the gun you're talking about?

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=328756283
     
  11. klcmschlesinger

    klcmschlesinger Member

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    Not everyone will agree with this, but I shoot 357 and 44 mag. 357 to me is rougher on my wrist and hands. It seems to be a snappier recoil. The 44 mag to me is more of a push up through my arms and even into my shoulders. Not painful, but more of a big push. I think the 44 is easier on the wrists and hands than 357. But in 44 mag I shoot the Ruger Super Redhawk. The thing weighs about 5 pounds and handles recoil pretty well.
     
  12. skidder

    skidder Member

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    My hunting revolver is a Redhawk. Although I prefer the wood grips, these Uncle Mike's ain't too bad.


    RedWin2_zps2b2779f8.gif
     
  13. Trent

    Trent Resident Wiseguy

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    Mmm.. stainless. :)

    I don't know what it is about stainless that just grabs my eye so much.

    Dumb question (I'm a noob at this) but how in the heck do you mount SCOPES to the top of these?

    My Ruger MKIII target gun was tapped for a standard mounting rail, which I have a 2-6x Leupold mounted to. Is that how these revolvers work? Or does it vary by brand?

    Are the ones above that look like they are "clamped" on really clamped on? How in the bejeezus can that stand up to recoil without slipping off, if that's the case?
     
  14. montanaoffroader

    montanaoffroader Member

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    When I can wrestle it away from my 17 year old daughter, I shoot a 5.5" Super Blackhawk. While the recoil is somewhat heavier than my .357 revolvers, it is not especially punishing. If I pay proper attention to my grip I can put quite a few rounds through it before I have to take a break.

    I originally wanted to pick up an Anaconda to go with my King Cobra, but the price went over the moon before I could scrape up the cash. Got a killer deal on the SBH, just couldn't pass it up.

    My BIL has the 7.5" version, and the extra barrel length seems to help a bit with recoil and muzzle flip.

    The Hunter series Blackhawks along with some of the Redhawks/Super Redhawks have cutouts for scope ring mounts on the barrel rib. Some models can be drilled and tapped for scope mounts, and I believe B-Square offers clamp on mounts as well.
     
  15. skidder

    skidder Member

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    For my Redhawk pictured above, Weigand makes a nice no drill/tap mount. The Redhawk has a plunger on the front that releases the front sight. The front of the mount attaches there. The back of the mount uses the rear sight screw and hooks on the back to handle the recoil.

    Here is a link to the mount with a nice video showing the instillation.

    http://www.jackweigand.com/Ruger-Redhawk-Scope-Mounts-No-Drill.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  16. Deer_Freak

    Deer_Freak Member.

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    I own a Super Blackhawk. I have taken several deer with it. I have never carried as a primary hunting weapon. Deer have an uncanny knack for appearing when a hunter is away from his rifle. I have killed deer with a handgun while looking for artifacts in a washout or freshly plowed field. I have lost count of the deer I have killed with a hand gun while in a group planning our next drive or just shooting the bull. I killed a doe in a field because someone said you can't hit that deer. I shot her down with the first shot. I still have the factory sights on the gun just like it came from the factory. I have owned the Super Blackhawk for 31 years. My gunsmith has replaced parts as preventative maintenance but it has never actually failed/broke.
     
  17. AgentV3

    AgentV3 Member

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    Redhawk all the way. Probably one of my favorite big bores. It's tough as nails and can even double as a war hammer if the need arises. Plus it still retains some nice, classical lines.

    FE253710-419D-48ED-9320-8F18A9C0F511-3458-000001531B2DBFA8_zps1f8ae3d0.jpg
     
  18. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy

    If you want a 44 Mag, the easiest thing to do is go to your local gun shop and look for a used Super Blackhawk. There are always a few on hand, often they come with a half a box of ammo because guys who just have to own a 44 Mag often go through about a half a box of ammo before they decide it is too much gun for them.

    I only own two 44 Mags, a 5" nickel plated S&W Model 29, and this old Flat Top Blackhawk.

    FlatTop44Mag01.jpg

    I bought the Smith one day on a whim, and frankly I hardly ever shoot it. I fell in love with the old Blackhawk at an auction last year and just had to have it. It is a much cooler gun than the Smith, so I shoot it more often.

    If you have never shot a 44 Mag you really should find somebody who owns one and try it before buying one yourself. Remember what I said about those guys who sell them after about 25 rounds. Of course, since you handload, you can always load them down, or shoot 44 Specials in one. Frankly, a box or two of 44 Mags is more than I want to go through in an afternoon, but I can shoot 44 Specials all day long.

    In fact, I own a bunch more 44 Special revolvers than I do 44 Mags. 44 Mags are big, heavy guns. 44 Specials tend to be a bit lighter, and more comfortable to shoot.


    I picked up this S&W 44 Handejector 4th Model last year. It is a big gun, but not quite as big and heavy as a magnum.


    44handejector4thmodel02.jpg



    I picked up this 624 a few years ago. I replaced the over sized grips on it with a pair of magna grips because I did not need the big oversized grips with 44 Special loads. This one is a real pleasure to shoot, and it is much lighter than a Magnum.


    624_MagnaGrips02_zps300975ee.jpg
     
  19. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    I know the feeling. But we're just trying to make the thread interesting. :D

    The scope mounting aspect is why I opted to buy the Ruger Super Redhawk when the 480 first came out. I got the 480 based on my reading about the caliber and felt that the caliber was more flexible than my beloved 41 mag. It was my first larger than 44 handgun I ever fired until then, but felt that something a bit larger than 41 mag may be "better". I have come to the conclusion that either the 41 or 44 mags work just fine for bambi.

    I didn't believe that some of the mounts would be strong enough to tolerate the recoil and I didn't want to drill and tap my S&W M57. Hence, new gun. I also didn't want to make a mistake. I don't regret my choice and to this day I still don't know if say the B-square mounts are strong enough. I got what worked and stopped there. I have recently bought a BFR in 480 Ruger/475 Linebaugh but have not really shot it much yet, and only in 480 Ruger to this point. The 480 is big enough for me. But like most of us, I wanted to "feel the power" of the 475 Linebaugh. The scope mounting aspect is hanging out there if I decide to put a scope on this beast. It is driled and taped for a scope although I will have to get the mount from Magnum Research.
     
  20. 98Redline

    98Redline Member

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    I will throw my $0.02 in once again....

    I have a 5 1/2" Stainless Redhawk identical to the one posted by Skidder, and it is a fantastic gun, one of my favorites. Solid as a rock, strong and accurate. That being said, if I were buying my first 44, the Redhawk would not make the cut. I would opt for the SRH. The biggest reason is in the action. The Redhawk uses a single spring setup for both the mainspring and trigger spring. This means that you are always splitting the difference between a light enough trigger pull and a heavy enough hammer strike. It is a pretty well known issue that going just a hair too light on the spring can result in a click, but no bang. The SRH uses the same dual spring setup as the GP100 and is far easier to get an acceptable trigger pull without getting light hammer strikes.
    The other benefit to the SRH is the spike grip vs. the full grip of the RH. There are many more options for grips on the SRH and all of them cover the backstrap on the frame. This does make a big difference.

    The freedom arms is no doubt a fine gun. I have handled a couple and they are really a work of art but I don't think that they are necessarily any more accurate than a decent quality Ruger. Buy a Ruger, get a trigger job on it and you can come very close to what you get from FA but for a heck of a lot less.
    Fire lap the Ruger and I would say it will be every bit as accurate as a FA.

    As to the Single Action/Double action thing, I can't say that I have ever taken a shot double action while hunting. So from that standpoint I don't see the the DA as being better or worse. The shape of the grips on a SA or a Double changes the way you feel the recoil. The DA guns tend to come more straight back at you, while the SA guns tend to roll up in your hand. I don't find either objectionable however after awhile when shooting a DA, I really start to feel the beating in the web of my thumb.

    For single action grip shapes, I find the Bisley grip (same as 1858 and CraigC's pics) to be far more comfortable to shoot heavier loads with. It feels somewhere between a regular plow handle grip for a single action and a double action grip. Sort of like the perfect balance between rolling up and straight back. You will also notice that most of the custom big bores (475 Linebaugh and up) are all built on bisley frames. Those guys know something about recoil and what tends to work best.

    Cost wise, I would say a Super Blackhawk Bisley Hunter is probably one of the best values going.

    The scope mounting is something that you should pay close attention to. The 44mag is not the biggest of the big bores but if you run it hot, it is more than capable of damaging the "no drill" mounts. I tend to run nothing but top end loads from the Bisley Hunter (320gr @ 1350fps) and I have had 2 no drill mounts fail from the recoil. While I don't like the idea of a D&T mount, I think that is what I will end up with as I have broken one mount a year.
    If my red dot would fit between the Ruger rings, I would use them, they are well made and lock in place very securely. I doubt you could hurt them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  21. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    That is pretty much my opinion as well when you distill it all down. It really just depends on your intended use. I love my 4" M57, but I would not likely hunt with it. Back up, sure. Trail protection? excellent. I also love my 8 3/8" M57, and have hunted with it when I go scopeless.

    But if hunting is a serious consideration, I would choose something in a 5.5" or longer barrel out to 7.5". Longer than that, the revolver gets more cumbersome in the field.

    But when you add in the scope or optics consideration, I lean toward Redline's view and the Rugers at least give you the option of shooting very hot loads if you decide to go that path.
     
  22. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    I have to disagree about the accuracy. Rugers can shoot very well but FA's are guaranteed to shoot superbly. Like I said before, a good Ruger will do 2"@50yds but an FA will easily halve that. I have never seen a Ruger shoot as well as an FA that was not a custom with a scratch-built linebored cylinder and premium barrel. FA's manufacturing methods make for a much more accurate and more consistently accurate sixgun than any factory Ruger could ever hope to be. Whether or not that level of precision is wanted or needed is another matter entirely. I would wager that most shooters couldn't tell the difference......but it is there. ;)


    I agree. While I've never had an issue carrying a 7½" revolver, I wouldn't want any more than that. I don't see a reason for the 9½" SRH to even be in production.
     
  23. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Everything I know about Freedom Arms revolvers is based on what other people say. Magnum Research did make their short cylinder BFR model in 44 mag for a while. I have looked casually for a couple years for a 6.5" BFR in 480/475. Finally found a nice used one and I got it. I think the BFR might make a good choice in 44 mag if you can find one. Their accuracy is reputed to be excellent and on average better than Ruger. Of course, there is always the 454 Casull models. That is a caliber I shot a couple times and have stayed away from it as I know I wouldn't shoot less powerful loads in it. As Redline said about the 480 Ruger... recoil is "energetic" and the 475... MORE "energetic". But what caliber can you shoot 400 gr bullets that have something like 5 feet of penetration? :)
     
  24. Hammerdown77

    Hammerdown77 Member

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    I agree with Craig on the Freedom Arms accuracy vs. Ruger. If you want a gun that can have accuracy close to a Freedom Arms and not pay the price premium, get a BFR. You are more likely to get a BFR with similar accuracy potential to a FA than you ever are a Ruger. If you get a Ruger that shoots like a FA, then it was by sheer chance and perfect tolerance stack up in all the right directions and you should NEVER sell that gun.

    I think it is in one of John Linebaugh's articles where he says a good, factory Ruger will shoot into 2" at 25 yards with the proper loads and a good shooter behind the trigger. That's typical, some are worse (I've got a couple), and even less likely, some are better. My 454 Freedom Arms will shoot into one hole at 25 yards. The test target shows that (no, not a cloverleaf, literally the SAME hole), and I've cloverleafed 5 at 25 yards once. So I know the gun will do it. But you pay a hefty price for that accuracy, and most shooters don't "need" it. The BFRs I've seen have been more consistently accurate than the Rugers, and at a price of $800-$900 street price, are much, MUCH less than a FA.

    One good thing about all of this.....you sure ain't short on good options when it comes to the 44 Magnum!
     
  25. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    CraigC makes the valid point that many shooters couldn't tell the difference between a FA or Ruger when it comes to accuracy, but some can. A Ruger is more than accurate enough for the vast majority of hunting scenarios but there's more to this than just accuracy. If you've ever handled and inspected a FA then you'll know that the difference in build quality compared to any Ruger is glaringly obvious. I like Ruger revolvers for what they are ... rugged, reliable and sufficiently accurate ... but they are still mass produced revolvers with minimal finishing. I don't own a FA but I will one day because I like finely made machines regardless of whether I need or am capable of making the most of the superb accuracy that FA revolvers are known for.
     
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