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Uncommon Norinco 213?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by AnaxImperator, Aug 5, 2008.

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  1. AnaxImperator

    AnaxImperator Member

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  2. wnycollector

    wnycollector Member

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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2008
  3. AnaxImperator

    AnaxImperator Member

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    That's a Norinco Type 54 in 7.62x25mm (not 9mm), blued (not chrome/stainless like my 213), but without the typical ATF mandated add-on safety and apparently no importer stamp.

    $246 is actually a bit low for a non-added safety or import-marked Norinco Type 54; they generally go for at least $300 while unmolested Russian & Polish Tokarevs can easily sell for at least $350-400+, with the early Tula & Radom arsenal examples bringing top dollar.

    This is my 9mm Norinco 213. It's not that different from other 213s except for it being shiny instead of blued.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. wnycollector

    wnycollector Member

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    loosing that auction was the best thisng that happened to me! I would have missed out on my Polish Tok from AIM last month!
     
  5. AnaxImperator

    AnaxImperator Member

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    Informational tidbit: while an almost exact Tokarev clone, the correct designation for the Polish version is "Radom Wz48".

    Aside from genuine Soviet Tula Tokarevs, Polish examples are a close second in desirability for collectors.... and by some estimations, higher quality. Indeed, my own 1952 Wz48 is very well made.
    While the differences in fit-&-finish between Russian, Polish, Chinese, Romanian, & Yugoslavian Tokarevs aren't easily visible, the quickest way to assess the quality of a Tokarev is to grasp the slide and try wiggling it side-to-side. Any large amount of lateral play between the slide & frame will effect accuracy, and from what I've seen Russian, Polish, & Chinese TTs have the tightest tolerances.
     
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