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vacuuming powder

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by balderclev, Apr 28, 2013.

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  1. jack44

    jack44 Member

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    Use a shop vac.
     
  2. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    My shop vac has no filter - it is the base model, and I have used it for this chore for 30+ years with this vac. NO issues at any time - live primers, powder, brass and anything else on the floor
     
  3. Mr. Farknocker

    Mr. Farknocker Member

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    No problem with the vac so long as you are not also sucking up primers at the same time.
     
  4. balderclev

    balderclev Member

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    Oops...I vacuum up both spilled powder and unfired primers. Mostly deprimed primers though and spilled media. My little vacuum goes directly to the container though so I think I am good to go.
     
  5. noylj

    noylj Member

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    >My shop vac has no filter

    So, it blows all the dust out the back?
    There has to be something to prevent the dust from simply being blown out--usually a foam piece around the exhaust on the inside.
     
  6. cwbys4evr

    cwbys4evr Member

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    Not commenting on the safety factor because I sweep it up and throw it away. But recently I started gardening and I read (I think it was on here) that powder contains nitrogen which is good for the soil. So from now on when I sweep it up it's getting thrown in the plants
     
  7. Mel1776

    Mel1776 Member

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    My Craftsman 2 gal. shop vac does a fine job in the basement workshop (I have the 16 gal. in the garage for messier areas/things). I can even root around in it to find the occasional part sucked up in error.
     
  8. HighExpert

    HighExpert Member

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    I suspect that static is the problem. There are specially designed computer vacs that eliminate the static that a regular machine generates. I really don't think smokeless powder will blow but it might burn and a vacuum that is running draws in a real good draft as I found out when I sucked up an ember out of the wood stove. The resulting fire was hot enough to burn through the plastic tank on a shop vac and I am sure powder would also be. Set primers are another story. If they hit a fan or other moving part there is a good chance of detonation. If you have not set the anvil I don't think they are nearly as dangerous. Besides, they are hard to get. Don't waste them.
     
  9. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    I'm with the guys raising the B.S. flag with regards to blowing up vacuum cleaners. First, how can a primer ignite with its anvil unsupported? Second, even if it detonate a primer, the volume of innards of a vacuum is WAY too large to contain an explosion unless you sucked up a copious amount of powder. Third, too have been doing it for a long time with no ill effects. Fourth, if I ever did it, the FIRST thing I'd do is take pictures, which no one else seems to think to do.

    35W
     
  10. sevt_chevelle

    sevt_chevelle Member

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    There is NO WAY my 600 dollar Dyson is coming anywhere near my reloading bench. But I do have a cheap shop vac that I bought for like 10 bucks to vacuum up any powder or debris. After using my Dillon 650 I often unbolt the shell plate and vacuum the press, I just like it looking clean.
     
  11. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    My 30-06 is a powder vacuum. true story
     
  12. mokin

    mokin Member

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    At the moment, I find this to be one of the most entertaining threads ever.

    I use a small shop vacuum to pick up spills.
     
  13. Taroman

    Taroman Member

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    Mythbusters tried to get a vacuum to blow up or catch fire. Couldn't do it, even vacuuming gasoline.
    I've been vacuuming the odd spilled grains for years with no explosions or fires whatsoever.
    However, as they say" "don't try this at home!"
     
  14. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    I also use a shop vac with no problems. Yes there is a filter on the fan unit in most of them.;) One of the plumbers I work with had cleaned a boiler with his shop vac one day and hurrying to catch a ferry, tossed the vac in his van then got into line to board the ferry. As he waited to board he smelled something hot.:eek: Investigating he took the smoking vac out of the back of the van and tossed it to the side of the road where it promptly burned up to every ones amusement. Must have sucked up a couple hot embers of carbon at that last job.:D A vac can possibly burn up but with a proper filter I would not think it probable with primers and propellant.
     
  15. ranger335v

    ranger335v Member

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    I think the wife hazard is much greater than the powder hazard. Or primers.

    Smokeless powder is a flammable solid, not an exposive. I've repaired several vacuums over the tears and can't conceive how one could ignite powder so I have no fear of picking up random spills. I wouldn't suck up a pound of it all at once tho, brooms and dust pans work nicely for that. Can't see how a vacuum could set off a live primer either but everyone has to live with their own fears.
     
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