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What do you carry when you actually hike?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Macchina, Mar 2, 2013.

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  1. mcdonl

    mcdonl Member

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    During trapping season. .22 SA revolver, any other time it depends. If in the back country my SBH and if local woods and trails my detective special.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  2. Tony_the_tiger

    Tony_the_tiger Member

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    Hiking in black bear country I carry a 4" Ruger Gp100 with Buffalo Bore 180 grain hard cast flat nose gas-checked rounds @1400 ft/s.
     
  3. Scipio Africanus

    Scipio Africanus Member

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    The same thing I do every other day. A S&W 629 4".
     
  4. armsmaster270

    armsmaster270 Member

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    Depending on where I am going, a Sig226/357Sig, S&W 6" 586 .357Mag or a 6" 44Mag.

    Like one of these.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Greycliff gunman

    Greycliff gunman Member

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    I have shot toward a charging cow moose, not at it. Only wanted to stop the attack not kill it, it worked long enough to make as getaway. Have also pulled out on a human to protect myself and my children. No shots fired but definitely got the point across. also while hiking have gotten that feeling and unholstered my weapon. I have had a brownie popping its teeth at me while I was passing through. That will make you very nervous indeed.
     
  6. TAKtical

    TAKtical Member

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    After hearing about some recent incidents with criminals on "bath salts" I started carrying a 3rd spare 20rnd mag for my Glock 17.
     
  7. ku4hx

    ku4hx Member

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    10mm ... either my Smith 1006 or my Glock 20. Either is loaded with my cast 175 grain TCL at about 1,150 fps. Super accurate in both guns coupled with the deep penetration I want for the four legged critters I might face. Two legged also for that matter.
     
  8. gandog56

    gandog56 Member

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    What's hiking???


    Seriously, two total knee replacements means I don't walk for long times, especially going up and down hills and mountains....etc. The only thing that determines what I carry is the temperature out side. Cold, got a nice coat and a denim jacket that lets me comfortably carry something up to full size 1911's. Tee shirt and shorts day? Something in an IWB that is small and doesn't reveal I am carrying that day. Long pants, regular shirt? Opens the options a bit more, can carry like .380 ACP to 10mm.
     
  9. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    Depends on what particular threat I'm more concerned about. In this part of the state I've carried my Kahr P9, but I've also carried a scandium J frame in my front pocket.

    In places where there are bears I usually carry a S&W or Glock 10mm. I bought a used scandium 44 magnum (329PD) thinking it would be the ideal solution. Turns out it was completely unreliable with anything approaching full power loads, so I settled for 10+ round capacity instead. With 200 gr full power 10mm loads I feel pretty good about taking on any threat I will encounter east of the MS.
     
  10. WvHiker

    WvHiker Member

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    I generally bring a 3" SP101 in .357 magnum. I bought it for hiking.
     
  11. mic214

    mic214 Member

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    I live in the mountains of Southeastern New Mexico (7600+ elevation) surrounded by National Forest. We have a pretty good population of bear and mountain lion around these parts.

    When I venture into the woods, I carry either a S&W 629 or a Ruger SBH .44 magnum in the spring/summer months or a S&W 625 Mountain Gun in .45acp in the fall/winter months.

    Around the ranch, which is at 5600ft, we have a rattler or two, so in addition to one of the above sidearms, I pack a Ruger .22 single action loaded with snake shot.....
     
  12. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Member

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    Hiking?

    If I'm hiking I must be scouting, fishing (scouting with a pole), or hunting,
    in which case I bring one of these. 41, 41, or 357.
    march inventory 151.jpg
     
  13. TreeDoc

    TreeDoc Member

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    Little ruger bearcat on most walks and camping trips. Haven't 'hiked' in quite awhile. Not many bears where I go. Sometime a glock 26 or a light sw 638.
     
  14. 336A

    336A Member

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    I haven't taken the time to read through this entire thread but all I can say is WOW. After reading through only a couple of posts, one would be led to believe that there are all sorts of animals hiding behind trees just waiting to pounce upon the unsuspecting camper/hiker:rolleyes: I'd be more worried about two legged vermin or the possibility of crossing paths with a rabid critter than anything else which is easly handled with a .22.

    Growing up our family did a lot of camping way out on the back of my grandparents farm, way back in the boondocks. The firearm of choice for my father was always a .22 revovler, never once did he ever need it. Some years ago as a young infantry team leader at a instalation in northern NY which has a large and healthy population of bears. I was awaken one night to the sounds of a couple of Soldiers talking rather loudly. Wondering what all the fuss was about I asked what in the world was going on and who was out gaurding the ammo.

    I was imediately informed that there was a bear out there which according to one of them, just stood there watching him. Obviously the bear didn't chase him down and devour him or otherwise harm him. After a few brisk words the individual was back at his post with no incident. In all of my years stationed there (10) whenever I saw a bear it was always the south end of it as it ran off like a scalded dog, or it didn't stick around long for a photo op. So so much for having to worry about the ever present angry man eating bears.

    Sure bears can be a potential problem, but if a modicom of common sense is used, more often than not they won't be. When I went squirrel hunting with my .22 I never had a issue with one either, much less even see one. From what I've read so far here there is a bunch of unwarranted paranoia where black bears are concerned. Keep the twinkies out of your tent/sleeping bag, and don't feed the wildlife and you won't have an issue. Now grizzly bears is another story all together, but the last time I checked there haven't been any of those around here in the east in a couple hundred years.
     
  15. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    I agree with you. I usually carry a Colt Woodsman, although when it's deer season I'll carry a .45 Colt.
     
  16. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    This is true, but there is still a chance you will stumble into one that has cubs, or one that is just generally crabby. Never discount the .01%, as they are out there. A trail gun is like a condom. Better to have it and.............

    Yes, the west and griz are a different story. It doesn't take much to piss them off. Your best bet is to make noise and let them know where you are so they can get annoyed and leave. I think a lot of people forget about moose. They can be just as dangerous as a griz given the circumstances.

    People are usually my main concern too, but if I'm going to carrry a gun for protection from people, I'm also going to make sure it can take down any other threat that I may encounter. I agree animals are not just waiting around to pounce on you. Most animals, even predators, do not see humans as a food source.

    Working in the woods of the west on a regular basis gives you a different perspective. I've been bit by dogs, chased by very big dogs, nearly ran over by white tailed dear that had been spooked by a dirt bike, nearly ran over by elk that were spooked by a coworker, heard mountin lions scream when I got a little to close to them by accident, been followed by a lion, been chased by a domestic bull (I've never run that fast before.) gotten a little to close to a griz, I'been charged by a white tail deer in the rut twice, and had one jackass try to scare me away from his land with a shotgun in hand (That one went to court as my employer pressed charges, since I did nothing wrong. I was on federal land NEAR his home.). Things can and do happen. Being prepared is just good planning, which means bringing a gun that can settle all accounts based on your surroundings.

    Unfortunately, my employer does not allow me to carry on the job, so the irony of what I just said is not lost on me. Of course, I'm alive, and who knows? Being armed may have made things worse.
     
  17. hentown

    hentown Member

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    I do my dead-level best not to ever actually hike. When I actually bike, however, I carry a G26, the same G26 that I carry when I'm just circumambulating in my daily life.
     
  18. AKMtnRunner

    AKMtnRunner Member

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    In the mountains behind Anchorage, where I usually see half a dozen black or brown bears each year, I usually carry bear spray. I run at a good clip with the canister ready in my hand. I also make noise like calling out "hey ho, hey bear!" frequently and especially around blind corners.

    The spray would be very effective on threatening people and dogs and without as much paper work.

    Threatening bear encounters are extremely rare. I recall at least 20 bear sightings in the last several years and zero times did they want to get any closer to me. Statistically speaking, we're probably better off protecting ourselves by wearing a helmet every time we get into a car but we don't do that.

    I do have a 500 S&W mag, 44 mag, and a glock 10mm however I've yet to find a suitable way to carry comfortably and be ready quick enough should the need arise. Though I continue to look for carry options. Even my glock 29 would be a nice touch.
     
  19. Inebriated

    Inebriated Member

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    Up til now, it's been a G21. I'm annoyed with the weight, so I'm either going to go for a G32/33 or a G30/29.

    Whichever would replace my daily carry (19 and 26), so I'm in the process of deciding which cartridges do what I want the best.
     
  20. MikePaiN

    MikePaiN Member

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    I do most of my hiking here in CT so I don't worry about overly large animals. Like most of the Northeast population is dense ( :( ) even in the wilderness areas, human threats are probably a more likely problem in the field.
    Anyway, when I hike I carry whatever I might be using for EDC which is a small 9mm or .45acp.
    I do change my ammo load when I hike. I'm usually loaded up with Golden Saber(in either cal.) for EDC. If on a hike I'm taking a 9mm I switch to bonded PDX1 +P or if I have a .45 I'll usually load up with FMJ.
     
  21. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I carry my 460V in a Desantes hip holster, cross draw, with suspenders between my undershirt and outer shirt to keep the pants up. I'm a thin guy so my pants would slide down without the suspenders, or I would have to have my belt tightened to the point that I wouldn't be able to feel my legs. It is a comfortable way to carry for a day. Backpacking and a 3.75 lb revolver don't usually mix to well where ounces count. I can unsnap the thumbstrap with my left hand and draw with the right mighty quick. I am thin, but a large guy, so firing it one handed is pretty dooable for me, but bringing the other hand up for a proper grip is fast too. Check out S&W's holsters. If you have the full length 8 3/8ths inch bbl though on your 500, it may not work so good. But hey, if you're happy with bear spray, than more power to ya.

    It wouldn't be any good for running though.
     
  22. Greycliff gunman

    Greycliff gunman Member

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    People get mauled by bears in Alaska every year, probably the same in Yellowstone. I know several people who have been charged by black bear and brown bears. I even witnessed a group of tourists on the side of the road get charged by a brownie while taking pics. I have had them follow me through the woods popping their teeth at me. That gets a little worry some. Then anything that moves becomes a threat like porcupine under your feet or grouse. A former mayor here was attacked and lived by a bear. Another guy walking down the road barely got one shot off before it fell dead at his feet after jumping out of the brush on the side of the road. Moose are even worse they will stomp you and your kids. A friend from my church had one of his kids stomped by a moose at the bus stop. Wild animals are unpredictable. I have been attacked by seagulls. You have to be prepared. If you think a 9mm is going to stop a charging bears think again. Your .380 won't stop a moose. I have been charged by moose in my yard. Its the same reason we wear seat belts or helmets. For just in case. Not cause its cool, you want to be protected. I carry a .454 casul super red hawk and pepper spray anytime I plan on leaving the road. The reason for a double action is cause friend of mine got one shot off while being attacked by a bear and was afraid he would lose his gun if he tried to pull the hammer back on his single action. Luckily the bear died from the .44 magnum round.
     
  23. RJTravel

    RJTravel Member

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    Wow! You have merely demonstrated that you have never backpacked in the real western wilderness. I have been backpacking in the west since 1955, and have had a number of encounters. Twice I have shot bear under 15 yards. Contrary to common b/b opinion you have time to shoot a charging bear if you remain calm and smooth - I've done it. I've been f2f with lion that would not back off whatsoever, and many, many times within yards of moose that were not the least afraid of me. Three years ago I hiked in the Tongass N.F., Alaska - solo and unarmed. Never again. Grizzlies vastly outnumber people - I viewed a large number of them and never once saw their 'south end' running away. When the salmon are running you can get as close as you want to dozens of griz. They are not afraid of you. Come to the wilderness sometime and get educated before giving advice that could easily get someone killed.
     
  24. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    exactly
     
  25. eldon519

    eldon519 Member

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    That's a little harsh. I'd have to look again, but I don't think the OP specified grizzly country or Alaska. I agree with you for maybe 3 states. For the other 47, I'm with 336A. If you ask this question on a dedicated gun forum, 99% of people will tell you to carry something. If you ask this on a dedicated backpacking forum, outside of hunters, most will tell you it's unnecessary outside of Alaska. You pack your fears with your gear. Outside of hunters, the only guy I've seen carry a gun while hiking was a first-timer. Little did he realize the denim jeans and cotton shirt he had on were probably the biggest threat to his life. Cotton kills. Loaned him some of my wool for the night.
     
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