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What house hold cleaners would work well cleaning firearms?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by 10-Ring, Apr 27, 2008.

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  1. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

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    For the longest time, I used patroleum based hand cleaners to clean my guns -- cheap & very clean. But, now that these cleaners are no longer available, I've been looking for an alternative.
    Anyone out there use a non-conventional -- inexpensive -- effective cleaner?
    TIA
     
  2. sm

    sm member

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    Ivory Bar Soap.
    Blackpowder folks have been doing this forever.
    It works on Smokeless guns too.


    Zippo Lighter fluid, not only to clean, also for flushing out triggers, and bolts and this is all some rifles mfg one use to lube these areas.
     
  3. plexreticle

    plexreticle Member

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    I use wd-40. It's a household cleaner in my home.
     
  4. Treo

    Treo member

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    I used Easy-Off on the bore of a 102 howitzer when I was in the Army worked like a charm
     
  5. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Most of the kitchen liquid cleaners and de-greasers will serve to clean a lot of grime off, but BE CAREFUL, some of them, like Simply Green attack aluminum.

    There are few household cleaners that will remove carbon or copper fouling without damaging the gun or it's finish.

    I recommend something like Greased Lightning for general cleaning, but you'll still need a bore solvent to remove carbon fouling from the action, and for removing carbon and copper fouling from the bore.

    ALWAYS TEST FIRST.
    Some chemicals and other products can damage wood finishes, bluing, plastics, and aluminum.
     
  6. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    Window cleaner works well for cleaning bores and chambers of black powder guns.
     
  7. Oro

    Oro Member

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    For a complete detail strip, little is cheaper or faster than brake cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear gloves when using it. It's under pressure, has a nozzle for crannies and nooks. It is not effective as a bore/lead cleaner, though. Afterwards, lube your working surfaces, and wipe down your other surfaces with your oil or wax of choice. I do this with all "new" (used) guns I buy and they work much better afterwards, unfailingly. Afterwards, not "over-oiling" is key to keeping actions clean and dirt/residue free.
     
  8. Oro

    Oro Member

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  9. Sato Ord

    Sato Ord Member

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    I'd have to go with those who said WD 40 and lighter fluid.

    The lighter fluid is simply naptha, or what was known for years as dry cleaning fluid. It's what gets the grease out of mechanics uniforms that are provided by the uniform company. It's also great around the house to get out small stains on dry clean only upholstery, like couch cushions, curtains, and such. I worked for a shop in Charleston that had a policy, if you got grease on a seat or carpet, and it had to be cleaned, you paid for it out of your own pocket. All of the mechanics kept a can of lighter fluid in their tool box for that reason.

    Another nice thing about WD 40 besides it cleaning and lubricating in one step is that it is non-conductive. You can use it on electrical wiring and such. A car alarm rep once showed me that trick. You know how the keyless entry remotes get corrosion on the battery terminals? Just use WD 40 and a toothbrush and the stuff comes right off, and the residue won't short out the unit. Works on flashlights too.

    Of course, if someone throws a full can of WD 40 into a fire, say one that is burning in a fifty-five gallon drum, like when you're a security guard on a cold night and you're also bored, action will definitely pick up. Especially if your boss, who is a Vietnam Vet with PTSD, pulls up and gets out of his car just as the can of WD 40 explodes.

    The fireball must have gone at least forty feet in the air, and I never would have believed that a 270lb man would fit underneath a Plymouth Reliant K-car.
     
  10. EricTheBarbarian

    EricTheBarbarian Member

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    Window cleaner is the choice for me, but most of what I shoot if not all lately, is corrosive ammo.
     
  11. XDKingslayer

    XDKingslayer member

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    I use 409 and Dawn on the plastic of my XD.

    I use the 409 for general cleaning and the Dawn mixed with some hot water to take off any CLP that has found it's way onto the plastic.
     
  12. Conqueror

    Conqueror Member

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    Windex or other ammonia solution is good for neutralizing corrosive ammo, although plain hot water will work too. Orange oil (ie, Goo Gone) is good as a mild degreaser. I use dish soap to clean my pistol suppressors.
     
  13. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Hot Soapy Water + WD-40

    My personal preference:Hot water (around 180 degrees) with Dawn dishwashing liguid. Various soft bristle brushes including toothbrushes. Scrub disassembled gun parts then rinse thoroughly with clear HOT water. Air dry for a few seconds then apply WD-40 (sparingly) while parts are still hot. Blow off any excess WD-40 with compressed air (apply light lubrication with gun oil if desired but not really necessary) reassemble. I wipe down barrels and external surfaces using a cloth sprayed with WD-40. Do not allow any excess WD-40 or anything else to penetrate unprotected wood.
     
  14. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Watch your WS-40, it can leave a residue and mess with a stock's finish....Gumout carb and choke cleaner works well, just don't forget to relube after....industrial ammonia will get the copper out of your barrel...there are non=petroleum gun products that work well also...
     
  15. pasquot

    pasquot Member

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  16. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    oneounceload,this hasn't been my experience after using WD-40 on my guns for almost 40 years. I have never experienced ANY gumming period and never had a finish harmed. WD-40 WILL penetrate unprotected wood ie; flaws or open spots in a stocks finish. Also around cut checkering where finish will be thin. There certainly are products that will do a better job but WD-40 will do no harm (at least to metal and plastic parts).
     
  17. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    Unreal. And scientist and manufacturering companies have spent Billions of dollars in research and development of products for the expressed purpose of cleaning and preserving firearms and you are looking for a "house hold cleaner"??
     
  18. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    +1
    This is just laughable, if it wasn't so sad!

    Household detergents, simple-green, glass cleaners, etc. will do such an excellent job, they will most likely remove all the oil from places you can't get too to put it back.
    That includes cracks, crevasses, and the pores of the metal.
    And many of them are caustic, or acidic, to the point of causing damage to some materials.

    Bad idea all the way around!

    rcmodel
     
  19. Bentonville

    Bentonville Member

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    Bushmaster, I was thinking the same thing!:D
     
  20. tbtrout

    tbtrout Member

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    Simple Green
     
  21. primlantah

    primlantah Member

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    I used mobile 1 synthetic 10W30 on my xd for the first time the other day.... it worked pretty well on cleaning up carbon deposits using a flannel rag. its better than break free CLP IMO(cheaper too).
     
  22. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    All that money for R&D (which is passed on to us, the consumers) and they still can't beat soap and water.
     
  23. dicky r

    dicky r Member

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    yeah, and I once knew a guy that said the best thing to stain and re-oil my cedar and log home was motor oil. go figure.
     
  24. markmc753

    markmc753 Member In Memoriam

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    My cleaning lady does an ok job I guess... Let me know if you would like a reference to her
     
  25. primlantah

    primlantah Member

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    does she mop the floor first or swab the bore?
     
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