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What is the most durable electronic earpro out there?

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by IShootMemeCalibers, Nov 9, 2017.

  1. IShootMemeCalibers

    IShootMemeCalibers Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2017
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    I'm looking to get my first set of electronic earpro for shooting. I also would be using it for my new job in manufacturing. So I need something with very high durability, especially in areas such as dust/dirt ingress, waterproofing, and impact resistance. I also need to be able to run incoming comms (we get important radio announcements); a built in like would definitely be a bonus, but isn't a necessity. Also, I'm interested in peoples experience on comfort/long term wearing (pressure, sweat, etc), as this is not exactly something I can try out without buying them. Battery life is something to consider, but not a priority over the other things. I realize that something like this won't be cheap, but of course, all things being equal, less is more. Thanks.
     
  2. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    There's a problem. Unless all the occupational noise source you face is "impact" noise similar to the short duration high dB like a gunshot you won't get any benefit from shooting electronic muffs that are designed to cut out the microphone when the shot occurs. Most occupational hearing protection is either passive or noise canceling (only where you have machine noise that doesn't change rapidly).

    Electronic shooting muffs don't work the same way.

    If you need occupational hearing protection your employer is obligated to provide them which usually means passive plugs and/or muffs. If communication with the hearing protection is needed you narrow your options considerably, but the employer is still obligated to provide them.

    For electronic shooting muffs I've had very good luck with the Howard Leight products. You can plug a stereo cord into them so you can hear a radio or cell phone.
     
  3. IShootMemeCalibers

    IShootMemeCalibers Member

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    Nov 9, 2017
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    You might be right, but:

    1. It's a pretty small operation (but great pay), and they do provide earpro, but it's kind of ****, since it's fully passive, and makes it harder to do work well, since verbal communication is limited.

    2. There is some constant noise, but the main concern actually is impact/intermittent. I've looked up OSHA guidelines, and anything rated for firearms is sufficient.
     
  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I had an early model Peltor that was quiet and comfortable but after a few years it failed. They overhauled it but almost half the price of new. Lost in The Incident.

    I now have a Howard Leight Pro that is pretty quiet but not as comfortable to wear.

    A friend has Pro Ears Ultra that are very quiet and comfortable, but he has given up on keeping the electronics working.

    The MSA Sordin X Supreme gets great reviews but its NRR is inadequate, I don't care what Trevor says.
     
  5. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    I have a set of more inexpensive Caldwell electronic muffs. They work well and the batteries last for quite some time. A couple of months in the case of the range use only pair. While at work they are excellent at attenuating the framing guns report and hammer blows. I just turn them off when I am going to run a loud machine, like a router, sander or rotary hammer. They also amplify some sounds, so they work well with mumbling coworkers. :)

    They are also very durable. They receive a brass case impact every time I fire my Desert Eagle while wearing them. Sometimes I forget to bring the insert ear plugs for shooting it. There are many crescent shaped marks on the muff body but the electronics are unharmed. Perhaps the slimmer model they make would let them clear.
     
  6. jak67429

    jak67429 Member

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    For what you describe try the Howard leight electronic muffs. they don't "clamp down" on loud noise. they limit volume to a safe level. I can be talking to someone at the range and the gunshots are the same level as the person talking to me.
     
  7. natman

    natman Member

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    I have a pair of Peltor 6s with which I've racked up hundreds of hours while hunting over the last 20 years. I've had zero issues with them. Battery changes are a minor pain, not a problem for me because I only change them every few years whether they need it or not, but might me an issue with daily use.
     

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