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What's a free-floating barrel

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Combat-wombat, Jun 18, 2003.

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  1. Combat-wombat

    Combat-wombat Member

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    I'm kinda a novice when it comes to guns, so what's the difference between a free-floating and a non-free floating barrel?
     
  2. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    In a rifle a free-floating barrel is one that doesn't touch the forearm of the stock.

    It "free floats" above the wood.

    A free floating barrel is often essential to getting the best accuracy out of a centerfire rifle.
     
  3. shermacman

    shermacman Member

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    It has always seemed to me that 'free-floating barrel' is a misnomer. The barrel is obviously rigidly attached to the receiver. The thing that floats is the stock. That way when you are firing off hand the tension on the sling doesn't pull the barrel down. I am nowhere near good enough a shooter to notice a difference...
     
  4. 280PLUS

    280PLUS Member

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    so how is the barrel supported?

    :D
     
  5. JPM63US

    JPM63US Member

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    Cantilever . . .

    The barrel of any free-floated rifel is supported by cantilever from the receiver. Not the best for a long barrel (>21" or so).

    All serious modern competition guns are this way, so that the sling pressure does not effect the barrel and POI.

    Many guns are glass bedded or bedded other ways and are more than accurate enough for hunting or other uses. Bench rest rifles are often bedded, since the pressure on the stock/barrel is consistent that way.

    Muzzle loading rifles often need pressure on the barrel to shoot well, as they are low velocity and barrel harmonics really come into play - thus needing to be controled via bedding. I did some work with mine and went from 4" groups to shooting out the X ring at 50 yards.

    JPM
     
  6. Ol' Badger

    Ol' Badger Member

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    The opp. of a Owned Sinking Barrel!
     
  7. Mk VII

    Mk VII Member

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    it's not usually acceptable for military rifles, which have to act as a handle for a bayonet as well.
     
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