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Where do you live? And why?

Discussion in 'Rallying Point and Range Discussions' started by jim in Anchorage, Jul 27, 2012.

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  1. cowpoke

    cowpoke Member

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    SW FL
    Born an raised in central florida. But now i live in sw florida, cause my job is here, could be worse i could be in se florida
     
  2. amprecon

    amprecon Member

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    TN
    Texas, 'cause everywhere else ain't
     
  3. Cleveland48

    Cleveland48 Member

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    NE Mississippi ain't had no reason to leave. Good southern hospitality, great hunting, great people. If I ever moved somewhere, out west would be nice. Maybe western Montana or so.
     
  4. Manny

    Manny Member

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    Location:
    NE Ohio
    N.E. Ohio, because it's where I was born & raised and it's where most all of my family is. It also has pretty reasonable cost of living and especially with recent changes, Ohio's pretty gun friendly. Politically, I live in a heavily democratic area, but Ohio on a statewide basis is mostly republican which tends to fall in line with my political preferences. I live in the suburbs but Ohio has lots of rural land that is absolutely beautiful. All in all it's a pretty great place to live.

    If I have one dislike it'd be the cold snowy winters. It's lead me to consider moving to the mid south more than once, but I don't want to be so far from my immediate family. If I ever do relocate I expect it'll just be further south in Ohio. A couple hours south in Ohio helps get away from some of the worst of the winter extremes but still maintains the full four seasons and isn't too far from immediate family. Especially now that I have a least a couple family members in the mid-state area in Columbus.
     
  5. Spats McGee

    Spats McGee Moderator

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    Location:
    Arkansas
    My job is in central Arkansas, so that's where I live.
     
  6. PJSprog

    PJSprog Member

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    Location:
    Southern Illinois (STL area)
    Born and raised in a small city of about 40,000 in Southern Illinois, in the St. Louis metro area. Spent my first 39 years there. Left about 10 years ago when I finally got tired of watching it decay into a place I no longer wanted to live. Spent about 8 years in a small town of about 800 people before I got married again. We now live on her family's small farm about 40 miles east of STL. I love the quiet rural area, and the fact that we can shoot pretty much any time we want doesn't hurt. Way better than living in the city. I don't miss that at all.
     
  7. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    The end of the road between Sodom and Gomorrah Tex
    Rural Texas. You have to ask why? :rolleyes:

    We do have some mountains. The definitiion of a mountain is over 1000 ft relief. The Chisos exceed that as do the Guadalupes. :D

    If that ain't good enough for ya, Eagle Nest Lake and Taos is day's drive for you in New Mexico.

    qn5jyu.jpg

    2lkz7kp.jpg
     
  8. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    My favorite post:evil: Never have any of "Where else but Texas" posters [and they are legion] ever given a reson why.
     
  9. DualWieldViking

    DualWieldViking Member

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    Location:
    Kansas
    I have lived in Kansas City my whole life. I used to hate it because it is "boring". But as I get older, I have really come to love this city because it's got a bit of everything. It's got it's hippie side, it's country side. It's got tall buildings and wide open prairies all within 20 minutes of one another. It's got good gun laws. It's cheap to live. It's got history. Good architecture. A free museum. A lot of city pride..... AAANDDD AWESOME BBQ!!!!!!!
     
  10. Stony

    Stony Member

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    Location:
    East Texas
    Reared in Nebraska, but spent most of my working years in California...with some years in New Mexico along the way. When retirement came along, I searched a lot of the western states for a place I wanted to settle (far away from California). I took trips to Nevada, southern Utah, northern Arizona, etc...but couldn't find any place I liked better than east Texas. I've been her about 12 years, and I'm firmly rooted and will stay here until my final day. I hunt, fish or both on almost a daily basis and live the life I want to live.
     
  11. outlawjw

    outlawjw Member

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    Location:
    Boligee Al
    Born in Ms raised in south ,worked in all southern states & some western states have lived in west central AL last 40 yrs own land here in country shoot when I want in back yard out to 749 yards the the trees get in the way . Love my wife , children , grandchildren ,& job as machinist/millwright. If I were single I would live in Colorado nw . My hobby is taking run of the mill guns & making shooters out of them
    .including ars & LRS.
     
  12. plinker762x39

    plinker762x39 Member

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    Location:
    Daytona Florida
    central florida

    kinda where the job is! otherwise I'd be somewhere else.
     
  13. TwoFirstNames

    TwoFirstNames Member

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    Location:
    south central Idaho
    South central Idaho, because this is where the job is. I won't complain though; I happen to think that sagebrush flats are pretty (even if I am allergic to sagebrush). Spent the first 18 years of my life looking out the back windows of the house toward the Colorado front range, or out the front to Kansas. Never did really appreciate how special that view was. Wanted to get away for college, so off to Utah for a couple of years, then east to Virginia. The money was good, and I liked the job, but I have always been a western kid at heart, so started looking for a way to head back west, until the housing market crash forced my hand, and I ended up unemployed. Landed (luckily on my feet) here in Idaho six stressful months later and, other than my wife complaining that it is too cold for 11 months of the year, we are happy as can be. For now, anyway. :)
     
  14. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    In 1972, at age 22, a friend and I took our first long road trip out of TN to the west. Over 6 week, living out of a VW van (hippies, mostly), we visited several national parks, state parks and national forests in CO, WY, ID and UT. We were drawn mostly by the Rockies, but once west of them, eventually saw the spectacular beauty of desert and steppe.

    That process began at a little state park near Pocatello ID, our first real exposure to (what I now know is) Great Basin desert. We drove in in mid afternoon under a blazing July sun. Nothing but (IIRC) sage brush and juniper. We pulled up to the ranger station to pay for a camp site. The ranger was a young guy -- looked college grad. He was mopping the floor of a really nice tone building --station and museum -- that seemed to just blend into the landscape; IIRC, it was built with local stones.

    We asked him, "This place looks desolate. What's here? Why do people come here?"

    I don't remember his exact words, but they very sarcastic. Something that could be translated to, "you're right; there's nothing here at all; it's ugly as hell; why don't you guys just leave".

    We apologized, and explained we're from back east, just didn't know anything.

    He took our money for a camp site and said something like, "Be mindful of this place at sundown. Watch the light."

    We didn't know what he meant, but thanked him. We set up camp and started cooking the night's meal.

    Indeed, starting just before sundown, as the sun was sinking behind the mountains, taking the landscape out of the harsh sunlight, the place became magical. No other word for it. The air cooled, a breeze blew, and the colors of the plants and rocks under a deep blue sky just blew us away.

    Next morning, we swung by the station, and said, "Ok, we get it now. ;)"

    I've been a desert rat and desert lover ever since (current home state not reflecting that very well).
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
  15. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    Ah this thread is giving me wander lust. Maybe it's just because Alaska is entering winter but I sure do envy some of you folks.
     
  16. PJSprog

    PJSprog Member

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    Southern Illinois (STL area)
    And likewise, Jim. I'm sure many here - myself included - would love to visit Alaska.

    Not during the winter, of course. :neener:
     
  17. jlr1962

    jlr1962 Member

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    Location:
    Tejas
    I hear Afghanistan is nice this time of year.(smiley face here)
     
  18. OilyPablo

    OilyPablo Member

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    Location:
    WA State (NOT in Seattle)
    Where is the farthest north can I live to grow sweet potatoes and shoot my guns without being hassled, but not have that enervating humididity.
     
  19. walnut1704

    walnut1704 Member

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    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Illinois. Because that's where my wife is.
     
  20. medalguy

    medalguy Member

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    Location:
    New Mexico
    Born and raised in Texas, love the state and everything it has to offer but I HATE the humidity in Houston. We started visiting a friend who had moved to Albuquerque, and fell in love with the town and especially the mountains of northern New Mexico.

    So, after we retired, we bought a place nearly on top of a mountain with a view to die for. Humidity here in the summer usually runs in the single digits, and it's nice and cool in the evenings. Winters are not bad at all, maybe get 2 inches of snow, then it evaporates by 10 AM the next day.

    Best part is my property backs up to National Forest, and I can shoot on my acreage out my back door. For longer range BLM land is maybe 20 minutes away. Gun laws here are about as pro as Texas. Cost of living is low. What's not to like?
     
  21. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Location:
    Far N, E coast
    Was stuck on the upper left coast for five months until a week ago. If I'm lucky, I'll never go there again. So many reasons.

    Now in Florida, walking in pine, oak, palmetto flats. It's been in the high 80's everyday since I got here. (40's and 50's in my real home state.) I can deal with that. Here 'til sometime in late spring ... at least. Planning to hunt both hog and deer while I'm here.
     
  22. Turftech1

    Turftech1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2015
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    180
    Location:
    Utah
    Utah, just a little South of Salt Lake City. I was raised here, on a dairy farm that is now covered in houses. I have lived here most of my life, though I lived in Iceland for several years, and loved it there.

    I have loved living here, but would like to get out of the suburbs. I crave more space and less traffic. Utah, away from the city, Idaho, or Wyoming... maybe Montana.

    I love living in UT, but it is getting crowded here. The town I grew up was 1,200 people, now it's nearing 45,000. :barf:
     
  23. SwaneeSR

    SwaneeSR Member

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    Jan 1, 2015
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    Location:
    MN, United States of America
    Minnesota.

    We have everything here.

    We live in the suburbs of Minneapolis/St. Paul, commute to work everyday. We also own a small cabin about 2 hours away and go most weekends. It is rural and quiet, out of the drama and rat race.

    Where you live does' mean you can't visit the rest of the world and our great country. It is deer season here in MN and in WI coming up. I went pheasant hunting in SD for the first time last month , beautiful area.

    Don't just sit there... pack a bag and go..... No matter where you live, if you are able, go see something.
     
  24. TwoFirstNames

    TwoFirstNames Member

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    Location:
    south central Idaho
    Can't agree more, but don't forget the local attractions either. When I lived in Virginia I worked so much that we never got out to see any of the historical sites. Probably never will now, at least not until the kids are grown and gone.
     
  25. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Far N, E coast
    ^^ I agree with both of you. I've been blessed (and cursed) for the last five years or so in being subject to many moves (25, professionally driven). I've lived in 12 cities in three states (FL, ME & OR) on two coasts. (Color me tired of relocation.)

    The silver lining: I've been able to explore MANY local areas that are tourist attractions: people will travel by jet or long drives to get to places that are just down the road from me, even walkable or bike-able.

    In my current basecamp in central FL, a stone's throw from where I type this (out past the swimming pool) is what I call the back 40: a conservation area among subdivisions that's effectively wild. Can't shoot there, but I plan to camp out there stealthily. (By the way, we're in the mid-80's again today. Nov 13. But I'm not rubbing it in or anything. :neener: )

    About 3 miles from here is a beautiful county park on a huge natural lake with a few square miles of "wild areas" accessible by trails -- this is live oak, slash pine and palmetto ecosystems with gators, rattlers, mocassins, raccoons, many birds.

    And just 10 miles from me is one of the largest national forests east of the Miss'ippi River that includes four wilderness areas, deer and hog hunting, and everything from near desert to marsh and swamp -- with transitions over hundreds of meters. For an outdoor lover, ecologist/biologist, I'm in heaven: just doesn't get much better than this.
     
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