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WWII Russian pistols

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by DWS1117, Mar 27, 2005.

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  1. DWS1117

    DWS1117 Member

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    What sidearms did the Russian military carry during WWII?

    I am looking for a companion piece fro my M38 Mosin. At first I thought Makarov, but if I am correst those are more recent that WWII.
     
  2. wasrjoe

    wasrjoe Member

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    I believe they had Tokarevs and Nagant Revolvers in WWII. The Tokarev fires the nifty little 7.62x25 cartridge, and the Nagant fires a 7.62 round that is very unique. It's specially designed to work in the gas-seal design the gun uses.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Hkmp5sd

    Hkmp5sd Member

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    [​IMG]
    Russian N1895 7.62 Nagant Caliber
    $85.00 at SOG.
     
  4. max popenker

    max popenker Member

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    You're right. The TT gradually replaced the Nagant during WW2
     
  5. Krag

    Krag Member

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    There were also a fair number of Broomhandle Mausers in use and, as the war progressed, captured P38s and Lugers. I have seen all in WW2 photos.
     
  6. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    The 7 shot Nagant revolvers are unique, and cheap, plus the conversion cylinder is available to fire 7 rounds of 32 ACP. I have considered one myself....
    Toks are, for some reason, much more expensive....I bought one 7 years ago for $80, Chinese import, but when Chinese imports were hacked off at the knees, the prices went way up....
     
  7. yoky

    yoky Member

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    There is some info about Russian war handguns.

    Russian started to use Nagant which was replaced in the year 1891 very old model Smith and Wesson Russian cal. 44. Nagant was produced in two modifications DA for officers and SA for soldiers. Later SA model was finished and army factory in Tula (Russian city) had produced DA system only.

    Other gun which was produced was gun Korovin TK Gun which was produced in the year 1884-1946. First production was designed as a sporting gun for Red Army members. Later was modified and new modification had become favorite gun of Komi authorities and members of NKVD. Catridge was 6,35x 15,5 Browning.

    Tokarev TT 30/33 (1871-1968) was designed on the base of Colt M1911 cartridge 7.62x25.In the year 1933 gun was modernized and it was model known as a 33. During period 1933 -1945 were produced more then 2 millions guns.

    Makarov in the year1945 won the competition on service gun - cartridge 9mm Makarov. This time Makarov is most used gun in Russian LE and Army. With other types of handguns

    The most interesting Russian gun I thing is hand gun APS – Steckin fully automatic handgun. Within several years production was stopped due to some problems in construction and weak cartridge. During 80´s APS was replaced by short AKS – 74U.
     
  8. max popenker

    max popenker Member

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    to Yoku
    it seems that you mixed up dates of birth/death of designers and dates of adoption/retirement of pistols

    1st, Nagant has been adopted in 1895

    2nd, Tokarev TT has been produced up until 1951, and went out of army service in early 1970s

    3rd, Makarov PMhas been adopted in 1951, and still is standard issue

    4th, Stechkin APS also has been adopted in 1951, but discontinued in 1955 because of complexity of manufacture and subsequent high costs; by the late 1960s almost entirely removed from service, then brought back in late 1970s as the silenced APB pistol
     
  9. yoky

    yoky Member

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    Hi Max
    Sorry for my mistakes. In my documents year 1951 is year when SA has adopted 9mm Makarov. Your data are correct.
    BR
    yoky
     
  10. Clean97GTI

    Clean97GTI Member

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    Max, on your site, you list several Russian guns and the associated dates.

    You said the Makarov is stil standard issue, but what about the Grach? On yours site, you list it as having been adopted for Military and Law Enforcement use.

    In the US, the military only issues one pistol to standard troops. Special units or missions may get something else, but the Beretta-made M9 is the majority of our guys get.
     
  11. Clark

    Clark Member

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    I got this Russian Tokarev yesterday, with extra barrel and mag, for $300.
    I was hot to get a piece of WW2
     

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  12. max popenker

    max popenker Member

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    Grach, or the Yarygin PYa, has been officially adopted in 2000, but it is still a very limited issue; Makarov has not been declared obsolete so far, still is in production and i suppose will serve for many years from now.
     
  13. LightningLink

    LightningLink Member

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    DWS1117,

    German Sales Promotion recently imported a batch of Russian TT-33 pistols WITHOUT the added safety (like the Polish TT-33s have). These are refurbished pistols in excellent condition that are believed to have come from Germany (although there are no East German proofs). Although sold as all matching, barrels and hammer groups are likely to be forced matched with an old number lined out. Likewise, most matching mags were renumbered although some say they got true matching mags.

    Do a search on them at Gunboards.com and you'll find more information. Although some people had misgivings with them, most are happy with their pistol (including me :)). Mine has force-matched barrel, hammer group and two mags. The frame and slide are original matching. Mine is a 1944 in beautiful condition with a stunning mirror bore (looked unfired).

    HTH,
    LL
     
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