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10/22 trigger mods

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by ricebasher302, Feb 26, 2010.

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  1. ricebasher302

    ricebasher302 Member

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    I started my first 10/22 build. I and purchased a new gun to start with. The trigger was super heavy. I know there are several aftermarket options that are pretty spendy.

    Instead, I dropped my trigger group, gave it a look over and took it apart. After figuring out how it worked and finding out why it was heavy, I took to the hammer with a dremel and a very fine, soft polishing stone. After an hour or so of "test and tune", it feels like a whole new trigger! I understand that it probably messed up my warranty and all that stuff, and it's not the greatest trigger, but i know what decent triggers feel like (I have a CZ) and this one is pretty darned good. It's smooth, has no creep, is much lighter and has almost no take-up.

    I understand it's not a competition trigger, but as good as it feels now, I can't imagine what I'd gain by spending $200 on a drop-in replacement. Did I do good, or am I missing something?
     
  2. Jubjub

    Jubjub Member

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    Have you fired the gun since you did this? Polishing wheels tend to leave rounded off corners, and if you rounded off the sear notch in the hammer, or the end of the sear, you may well have a big problem.

    If you have yet to shoot it, please treat it as a single shot until you are sure that the hammer is staying cocked.

    [​IMG]

    This picture shows where to stone a 10/22 hammer to give a good pull. It is critical to set the proper angle, and to keep corners square.
     
  3. ricebasher302

    ricebasher302 Member

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    I definately will be careful when I try it out. That's a good picture. It tells me I was on the right track. The rounded corners are certaily something to double check. Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    My drop in replacement was about $40 (target hammer, springs, bushings). I think the $200 is for a full drop-in receiver pack.
     
  5. ricebasher302

    ricebasher302 Member

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    Hmmm. What make is yours, DoubeTap?
     
  6. Husker_Fan

    Husker_Fan Member

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    I used a drop in hammer and sear kit from Power Custom. I bought it from Cabela's with a "get $20 off a purchase of $60 or more" card, so a $65 kit cost me $45. It really made a big improvement over the stock trigger.
     
  7. roc1

    roc1 Member

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    How hard is it to put a trigger kit in a 10/22? i just bought my first 10/22 last weekend and noticed the trigger is heavy compared to my centerfires.
    Thanks
    roc1
     
  8. RSVP2RIP

    RSVP2RIP Member

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    I'ts not hard but the trick is to have all the correct punches and a good (read propper) hammer. A bench block helps also. I went with a Jard trigger group recently because it really dresses up the gun with it's trim lines. Be prepared to have to replace the mainspring though, as they are very light and cause misfires. They changed mine for free and now it's a very crisp reliable 1.5# trigger.
     
  9. Jeff F

    Jeff F Member

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    Well that = a screwed up hammer at the least and it could become dangerous to shoot if its not already. Get yourself a Power Custom drop in hammer sear kit and your good to go. Or you can replace your stock hammer and any other messed up parts and have someone who knows do a proper trigger job, my buddy does them in a half hour for about forty bucks and they are light, crisp, and safe.
     
  10. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    Adding a set screw to the sear well eliminate the trigger take up. Instead of a Dremel use a good stone to do hammer and sear work. Keep everything flat and keep a slight positive angle on the hammer notch. I've got the trigger on my bench gun at 8oz using oem parts.
     
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