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1858 Remington question

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by 66gt350, Jun 21, 2006.

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  1. 66gt350

    66gt350 Member

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    I've tried doing some searches without any luck. I'm wanting to get an 1858 Remmie. But what exactly is the difference between and 1858 Army and an 1858 New Army?

    Thanks
    Rob
     
  2. Wwalstrom

    Wwalstrom Member

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    Difference

    If it's an 1858 Army vs and 1858 New Army, should be the same (1858 implying Remington) ... now, if you were looking at an 1860 Army vs an 1858 New Army, totally different pistols, as the 1860 is a Colt.
     
  3. mec

    mec Member

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    most if not all the 58 remington replicas are the New Model Army. It's just the final, 1863 evolution of the beals design. some of the changes that happened along the way have to do with the loading lever/ base pin retension and the safety notches between the chambers.
     
  4. mainmech48

    mainmech48 Member

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    The original 1858 Remington .44 revolver model was called the "Remington-Beals". This was the model which was in production at the start of the War Between the States. In 1861, the loading lever was slotted to allow the cylinder base pin to be withdrawn without the loading lever being lowered and a new "1861" patent date stamped on the barrel marking. This is sometimes refered to as the "1861 Army". It became known as the "Old Model Army" in 1863 when Remington made some changes, chiefly removing the slot in the lever, and renamed it the "New Model". The barrels on these were marked with the original 1858 patent and the words "New Model".

    General specs and configuration were pretty much identical for all of them, otherwise. I'm not sure where, when, or how many of which were produced with the gain-twist and/or "Progressive" rifling which was touted as producing much-enhanced accuracy with both RBs and conicals. "Safety" notches were added to the cylinders along the way somewhere, too, but not sure of exactly when there either. When we're talking about replicas, it's virtually a moot point anyway. With the exception of only a couple of high-end limited production models, none of the current replicas offer the "exotic" rifling, and all of them have the notches.

    IMO, the nomenclature changed when the basic specs were altered as technical advances in both ballistic and manufacturing arts were incorporated into the design, as well as for pure marketing hyperbole. Declaring a "New Model" was an even bigger marketing tool then as it is today.
     
  5. sundance44s

    sundance44s Member

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    sundance44s

    The Armys are 44cal and the Navy models are 36 cal ... guess Uncle Sam didn`t think the sailors would run across any bears on the high seas .
     
  6. 66gt350

    66gt350 Member

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    Thanks. They're both 1858's, on the website some said "1858 Army" and some said "1858 New Army". so, just checking to make sure.

    Thanks
    Rob
     
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