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.22 Lever Plinker...

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by GZOh, Feb 10, 2012.

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  1. GZOh

    GZOh Member

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    Looking to purchase 22 Lever Action...
    Been looking at the Marlin 39A and the Henry H001M...
    Seems to be about a $200 difference (plus Marlins are very hard to get)...
    What are the pros and cons of each?
    Thanks
     
  2. aHFo3

    aHFo3 Member

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    I don't own either, but from what I've looked at and handled this is my experience:

    Henry's are really smooth out of the box, their walnut is pretty, but Henry uses a cast type of cheap metal for their receiver and the finish is some kind of coating that can chip/flake away.

    Marlin receivers are made with higher quality blued steel.

    I was also looking for a 22 lever, and I still don't own one. After my searching I'm going to hold out for an older Marlin.

    I think the Henry would be fine for a plinker. I prefer to buy firearms that will outlast me. It frustrates me when manufacturers go cheap. I'd rather pay the extra $200 and get a better quality product, and I realize that other opinions will vary.
     
  3. Jon_Snow

    Jon_Snow Member

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    I own a Marlin but haven't shot a Henry. Personally, I wanted the Marlin because I don't like straight stocks and because I've heard they are mroe accurate than the Henrys. I don't know if they are more accurate, but I do know mine is very accurate.

    39A's pop up on GB a lot. If you're patient, toss in lowball bids once a week and eventually you'll get one. I got mine for $375, in great condition, but it took me a couple of months.

    FYI, if you ever want to put better sights on it, like the Williams reciever sights, make sure you get an older Marlin without the safety. The new ones have a safety that interferes with any receiver mounted sight system.
     
  4. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Get a Browning. They're pretty neat.
     
  5. CaliCoastie

    CaliCoastie Member

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    as far as your questions,
    diferences are as follows in general. Marlin 24" barrel, pistol grip, american walnut and all steel. henry 20" barrel, streight grip, walnut, zinc/other metal reciever, the rest steel(barrel bands and front sight are now suspose to be steel also) and made in the USA(everything).
    accuracy is comprable, i did out shoot my buddy with my 39a vs his henry but i had peep sights and i have a longer distance between the front sight and rear sight.
    Henry has outstanding(from everyone who has to use them) customer service, while marlin(currently) is having issues.
    Either one is a good rifle, i would find both and see what you like best in your hands, then shop around and take your time. Eventualy you will end up with what you want and maybe even for a price that would surprise you. good luck
    PS, i havent paid more than 280 for any of my 39's, and my friend picked a couple up for 175otd ea, deals are out there if you have time.
     
  6. Babarsac

    Babarsac Member

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    Would a Henry Golden Boy model be an upgrade?
     
  7. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    Find an older Marlin 39 used. The wait will be worth it.
     
  8. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    The Golden Boy shifts up to a brass receiver so it's somewhat tougher than the alloy.

    But really, it's a .22. Older alloy receiver Henrys are still running strongly after many, many thousands of rounds from reports I've seen. The only possible issue would be wear. But such alloys can be largely self lubricating when in contact with steel so again it's quite likely/possible that the alloy Henry receivers will last as long and for as many cycles as the all steel Marlin receiver.

    The one factor that would sway me is the preference for the style of stock. If you want a pistol grip stock then you're going to want to shop for a good used Marlin.
     
  9. Grunt

    Grunt Member

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    I have both a 39A and 39M Marlin and I love them. Never handled a Henry so I won't comment on them. What I do know is the Marlin is VERY accurate, durable and reliable. I also found out by accident that the takedown knob has to come back to the same spot if you take it apart or else your POI shifts one way or another. When I first zeroed in my 39A, I took it apart to clean it and when the next time I fired it, it was way off. Ever since then, I tighten down the screw hand tight then turn it to a vertical position with a screw driver. Ever since then (and that was over 20 years ago I learned this) I haven't had any problems with zero shift.
    Personally, I guess if I was looking for another .22 lever action, I would try to find a pre-Freedom Group Marlin. Ever since Freedom Group bought out Marlin, they have been having a number of QC problems. Some have been alright but from what I've been hearing, the quality isn't what it used to be.:(
     
  10. GZOh

    GZOh Member

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    Grunt... That date for the pre-FGM is usually what?

    .
     
  11. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    I'd be willing to bet anyone my Henry will easily outlast me and the next owner too.

    All 3 of mine are accurate and worked "perfectly" right out of the box and they feed everything from CB caps to Vipers perfectly EVERY time, even if i mix them.

    I don't think you will be unhappy with buying a Henry lever 22 rifle for a plinker or for a hunting rifle...

    DM
     
  12. aHFo3

    aHFo3 Member

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    Not True. It is still an alloy receiver. This is taken from Henry's website:

    It is a brass finish over alloy.

    Henry does have excellent customer service. My brother had an issue with a Golden Boy that had some cosmetic flaws. He ended up speaking with the company president, and they sent him a new rifle with a beautiful hand selected walnut stock. Henry sent a postage paid sticker for the original rifle, but the original rifle was stolen out of the back the car before it could be shipped, and Henry didn't hold my brother accountable for it. We were pretty impressed. They did want police reports and stuff, but they were very understanding.
     
  13. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    This used to be true when I worked in a gun shop. I assume it still is.

    Henry's do not have bluing on the metal. It's some kind of paint. If you look at the owner's manual, it is very specific about what can be used to clean the bore and outside. Some of the typical bore cleaners will remove the paint.

    We had a guy that brought his back in about a week after he bought it. Finish was about 1/3rd gone where he tried to clean it.

    I have a Browning .22 BLR. Gorgeous rifle, but the trigger stinks.
     
  14. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    why are you comparing a Henry in .22wmr and a Marlin in .22lr?

    ===

    There's nothing wrong with the Henry, they're cheaper and easier to find. Look at the entire H001 series, they have a nice youth model and the Lever Carbine (my favorite) as well as the "Frontier" which has an octogan barrel and easier-to-upgrade sights.
    Worries about the material are silly, it's a .22 and a manual repeater, and the parts that mater are steel anyway. The plastic barrel band is fine, although the metal one looks a bit nicer ... new models have the metal, and a used or new-old-stock model will accept the new parts which are quite inexpensive.

    I can't imagine how someone would strip off 1/3 of the paint following the directions in the manual ... no solvent I've ever used has had any effect on the finish on my 3 H001 series leverguns (H01L, H001ML, H001TM).
     
  15. GZOh

    GZOh Member

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    BFDave... On the Henrys, whats the difference between the H001M barrel and the T with the octagon barrel?...
    Also, on several sites they describe the rifle finish as 'Blue'... that shouldn't 'wipe-off' if it's Blued?
     
  16. Grunt

    Grunt Member

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    GZOh, I believe it was 2010 when Freedom Group bought out Marlin.
     
  17. PapaG

    PapaG Member

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    I gave my old 39 to son #2 and missed it so bad I kept my eyes and ears open and ultimately found a 1946 model 39 a year or so ago. It had four extra holes drilled and tapped on the side for a god-awful side mount and skinny scope. I bought it, pulled the scope, plugged the holes and have a really nice 39. Next up, strip the stock and give it a good oil finish. Then, vernier tang sight.
    No microgroove...real cut rifling. Shoots pretty well but my 67 year old eyes need a little help.
     
  18. cpt-t

    cpt-t Member

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    Lever action 22 plinker

    A Marlin 39-A was my first rifle my wife got it for me for X-mas in 1963 I still have it and I have carried it a lot of miles and have shoot a truck load of jackrabbits when I was young. The famers were paying .25 cents a peice for them around Wichita and I shoot a lot of them. That little rifle was my pride and joy I was so proud of it and I had good eyes back then and I could hit a jack 75 to 80 yds away most of the time and if I could get to a fence post a 100 yds was possible most of the time. The little rifle still shoots as good as it ever did. My Son bought one 20 years ago and we still have them both and still hunt with them. I am sorry I do not have any experience with the Hennery rifle. But my Son and I both think the world and all of our 39-A Marlins. I hope you find what you want and enjoy it as much as we have enjoyed ours. ken
     
  19. az_imuth

    az_imuth Member

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    Not BFD, but Henry's description of their finish is as follows:

    Finish: Blued barrel and lever

    The difference between the H001M and the H001T is the caliber and the barrel type. The H001M is the round barreled (18.25") rifle in .22 WMR (magnum) with checkered walnut, while the H001T is an octagon barreled (20") rifle in .22 S,L,LR with uncheckered walnut.
     
  20. boykinlp

    boykinlp Member

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    I now have both rifles that you are looking at. I got a 1964 Marlin 39A this week. It is a much, much nicer rifle than the H001. The quality is nowhere close to the same. If you upgrade the Henry to a Golden Boy, quality might be closer, but IMHO, still not as good. here are some pics of my Marlin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  21. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    GZOh, it looks like az_imuth beat me to it.

    For a general plinker, I would NOT want to give up the option of shooting .22short, particularly the superb CCI load known as a "CB short". They're quiet, really quiet, and you can cram a LOT of them into that tubular magazine.
    Anything in the H001 line (other than magnum or .17hmr offerings) will run shorts. The Golden Boy line will also run shorts, but check to see if the GB stock angle works for you before buying, it is a historically correct angle, and I find it uncomfortable and distracting.

    If you just want a rifle in .22wmr, either the H001M or the H001TM will serve you well, the difference being sights and barrel profile. Henry's website is quite informative, although I suppose their description of "blued" for finish is a bit misleading. For whatever reason, a black glossy firearm will be referred to as "blued" in many cases ... it isn't a Henry thing, it is a gun industry thing. The rifles are black, and don't tend to rust or lose their finish unless abused or cleaned by overzealous military types who think a soak of the entire gun in gasoline/diesel is a good idea. Don't drown it in solvent and you'll be fine.
    The Henry sub-forum over on rimfirecentral is probably the best source of detailed info, other than just calling Henry Repeating Arms yourself. (if you call and get someone named "Tony" ... chances are you're talking to the owner, he's pretty cool and really believes in customer service)
     
  22. GZOh

    GZOh Member

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    Thanks for all of the help and information guys... really appreciate it.

    BTW... Beautiful Marlin boykinlp!

    .
     
  23. CaliCoastie

    CaliCoastie Member

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    GVOh, easy easy to tell the newer Marlins is the detail number on the few I have seen start with MR. good luck
     
  24. x_wrench

    x_wrench Member

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    i ended up buying the Henry. i am 55 years old, and i will never wear out a gun. if i was young, i probably would have got a Marlin. the Marlin is definitely higher quality, and probably a little more accurate. my take is this. if you want a rifle, that you will shoot all of your life, then pass it down to your kids, so they can pass it down to their kids, buy the Marlin. if you want a gun to shoot, have a lot of fun with, and have your kids wear out, buy the Henry.
     
  25. hogshead

    hogshead Member

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    I have had both the Henry and the Marlin, also a Winchester in 22lr. I kept the Henry not because it was any better but because I don't mind taking it on 4 wheeler and actually using it. The Marlins have become so expensive I hate to treat one rough.They are also longer than the Henry's unless you find a Mountie and they are even higher than the standard length.
    The Henry is a slick action and has been very reliable for me. The Marlins are obviously a better made gun but becoming rare and expensive. So bottom line do you want a shooter or a safe queen.
     
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