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223 brass

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Wing Nut, Jul 29, 2007.

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  1. Wing Nut

    Wing Nut Member

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    I bought some new winchester 223 brass when I usually use remington brass and was wondering if I should expect a different pressure and load accuracy from the winchester brass. I use 24.5gn of 2230 powder and 55gn vmax bullets . my worst group with that load is 9/16 of an inch with 5 shots at 100 yards. I wanted to know if any one had some opinions on what to expect.
     
  2. esheato

    esheato Member

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    Different components, different results. No matter how small the change (bullet, brass, primer, propellant) start at the minimum and go up from there.

    Expectations? I have no idea. You didn't mention what gun you were shooting. Also, I can see that you're using good components and that's a big step in the right direction.

    Accurate guns are typically accurate with lots of different loads. Sounds silly, but it's not.

    Ed
     
  3. Wing Nut

    Wing Nut Member

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    I am shooting a tika T3. I know the winchester brass is thicker and lasts longer thats why I wanted to switch. some I have talked to have said it will not matter but I wanted a second opinion and I will start with min load.
     
  4. Dave R

    Dave R Member

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    In general, if the brass is thicker, then the case has less volume, and that will raise pressures.

    So, as you said, start with the minimums and work up. If you have a chronograph, you might find higher velocities with less powder because of the lower case volume.

    That's the theory, anyway.
     
  5. RustyFN

    RustyFN Member

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    What Dave said. Any time you change a component you should reduce the load and work back up. That's the fun part of reloading isn't it?:D
    Rusty
     
  6. Wing Nut

    Wing Nut Member

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    thanks, U are right.
     
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