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.257 weatherby ???

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by rwmcquigge, Jan 21, 2007.

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  1. rwmcquigge

    rwmcquigge Member

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    wondering if a .257 weatherby is to light for moose?
    120 grain nos,partitions.
    ballistics look good! any thoughts on it, i would appreciate it thanks.
    im looking for a new rifle for (deer,bear and moose)
    most shots under 200 yrds.
     
  2. SUBMOAS

    SUBMOAS Member

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    Yes.....

    IMO...
    That caliber would do if you had the "perfect" shot. Neck shot that is...
    Remember the size of those animals(moose) can exceed 1200lbs.

    What type of bears? Don't matter..
    Don't use your .257 for bears......

    With you talking about shot under 200 yards you might want to think about the 30-06. With bullet ranges from 110gr-220gr, you can cover "most" North American Game....
    Good Luck.......and remember the saying

    K.I.S.S..........
     
  3. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    You need to buy a 300 Weatherby and forget about the .257 with the game you list.
     
  4. one-shot-one

    one-shot-one Member

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    $0.02

    if your buying a "new" rifle anyway, i'd get something that threw a little bigger chunck of lead/copper. the .257 wm would be great on deer but when stepping up to elk, moose, bear, i want a minimum of 7mm mag and a .30 or
    .338 would make me feel even better.;)
     
  5. hagar

    hagar member

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    I would only use one if it was given to me for free, with a bunch of ammo, I could not trade or sell it, ever, or buy another rifle, ever.

    Other than that, it is a fine caliber for either wounding big game, destroying all edible flesh, while deafening the person shooting it.
     
  6. LAK

    LAK Member

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    If anyone has or comes into possession of a new or reasonably clean .257 Weatherby rifle that they just can't stand to have around - by all means give it to me.

    In fact, a gouge in the stock here and there, a few scratches, nicks or slight dings on the metalwork are OK too for all I care. It can be without manual, ammo, sling, scope, carry bag, cleaning kit or anything else.

    I can tolerate it being around, I can stand it. I'll give it a good home.

    http://societyforthepreventionofcrueltyto257weatherbys.com

    ----------------------------

    http://ussliberty.org
    http://ssunitedstates.org
     
  7. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    The .257 Wea. Mag. Can Do the Job

    Roy Weatherby harvested (1-shot) Cape Buffalo with the .257 Wea. Mag. For my comfort, I would use a .30 or .33 caliber just as a safety measure. Too, let's not forget that moose are like freight trains...they run straight! If you're in the way, I suggest 1 shot, then prayer.

    For bears, there is no way I would want to try a .257 caliber. With the body fat they have, I would want to punch a very large hole to permit more effective bleed out.

    Doc2005
     
  8. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    The .257 would be EXCELLENT on deer and black bear (not grizzly), but moose is a little much. I mean, I never killed a moose, but I've seen 'em and they get HUGE! I want my 7 mag if I'm after one of those things, or at least my .308.

    I've killed many a whitetail with the .257 Roberts and .257 is one of the best of the best small caliber whitetail rounds IMHO. It kills like lightening. the .257 Weatherby just extends the range a bit. It would be a fantastic pronghorn caliber out in Wyoming. It's an excellent mule deer round out in the canyons where the long shots occur, but I'd limit game to about 500 lbs in weight and elk and moose exceed that. I know guys that hunt elk with the .25-06 and have great success, but I mean I just can't see why they hunt with such a small caliber when there are better calibers for game that heavy. I don't know if you could buy a finer caliber than .257 Weatherby for whitetail hunting senderos here in south Texas, long range lightening on such game. But, it is simply limited by its bullet weight on big western game.
     
  9. K.L.O.sako

    K.L.O.sako Member

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    I'll have to throw a vote in for the .300 remington ultra mag. it'll take anything you mentioned and then some. everything i've shot with it falls over dead, like turning off a light switch. on your choice though, deer, pronghorn, hog,sheep, i say .257 yes. but on anything that can stomp, claw, bite, or horn you to death leave the 257 at home. at a minimum take a big .30cal.
     
  10. GooseGestapo

    GooseGestapo Member

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    of the above, MCgunner is the only one who actually probably knows what he's talking about.

    The .257WM is an excellent cartridge. With the 120gr Nosler Partition, it'd do what you want it too.

    Is it the best possible choice? Perhaps not. But a rifle purchase is as much emotional as practical.

    Practical ? Get a Savage M110 or Remington700 synthetic, mount a GOOD 4x scope, sight in with 180gr Federal/Nosler Partitions. Go hunting.

    The .257WM will not be "optimum" for the Moose, but for Elk or lighter will do nicely. It will do the job on moose though. I know some who have killed many Moose with a .243, and others swear by a .30/30 with 170gr Rem.CorLokts factory loads. Moose though quite large, are not particularily hard to kill. Pound for pound, the whitetail deer and particularily pigs are harder to kill. For Black bear, the .257WM will do well. Largest blackbear killed in Georgia ran over 600lbs. Was killed with a single shot from a .243.

    I too have a .300RUM. I'd not "recommend" it to anyone for any reasonable use. Not a bad rifle, but too much of everything !!!!! (But I do "like" it!!)

    If you don't get the .257WM, get a .30/06. It WILL do most everything acceptably well. But, so will the .257WM. Recoil is about the same, trajectory is much in favor for the .257WM.

    My .300RUM will probably at some future date sport a .257WM barrel. But, my .257Roberts will do nicely too.
    It "HAS" taken an elk. Did better than my .338/06, too.
     
  11. Lee Woiteshek

    Lee Woiteshek Member

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    I've got a 300 Weatherby, in the Accumark model. Topped with a 3X12 Swarovski PH. It'll kill a bear, as I have one on my wall. I orginally bought it for long range beanfield shots at whitetails. As I get older however, the recoil is becoming uncomfortable. The weapon hasn't gotten any lighter either. Last couple of years, the Weatherby has spent the hunting season in the safe. I'm also looking at the .257 as another beanfield rifle. Loaded with a Barnes 100 grain TSX at 3600 fps you could do alot worse for long range game less than 500 pounds. There are some guys on the campfire forums that use the 25 caliber for game as large as moose, the swedes use the 6.5 for moose at rather sedate velocities. It can be done, but as the previous posters suggest, there are better alternatives out there. If your worried about the recoil you can brake it, but that has its own concerns. I have a BAR in 308 with the Boss, and that is one sweet shooting rifle. Recoil is at the 243 level, and I can't tell the difference in muzzle blast or noise from unbraked. Using a 165 grain Barnes TSX I'm condfident you could take your moose at yardages 200, maybe 250 and less. Wouldn't detach your retina either.
     
  12. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Hmm, that's interesting. Maybe I'd rather take my .308 if I ever go after one of those monsters. It sure is easier to tote than that 7mm cannon and is just as accurate. She's taken a few pigs, too.:D
     
  13. uk roe hunter

    uk roe hunter Member

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    light

    In my opinion a .30-06 with heavy, long, soft point bullets would be great, it would penetrate deep and expand well killing well.
     
  14. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    You're right Goose...I don't know...but Ed. Weatherby did/does!

    You see, Goose..., information is everything. Back in 1986 when I was researching in preparation to purchase my first Weatherby Mark V, I sought out numerous professional opinions. In my research, I found several comments published by Ed. Weatherby. While the .257 Wea. Mag. was his favorite, he viewed the .300 Wea. Mag. as the most efficient and effective. The Weatherby caliber most endearing to him was the .270 Wea. Mag. When I give an answer that is based on my personal view, I usually say, IMHO, or something similar. At any other time, I try to base any answers in the facts provided from others, who as you have articulated in a so-not-THR-way, know more than I. :evil: The general Weatherby opinion was that the .270 Wea. Mag. was about the minimum Weatherby Magnum that would be prudent for big bear, and that the .300 Wea. Mag. or larger was preferable.

    Doc2005
     
  15. mbt2001

    mbt2001 Member

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    The .257 Wetherby is great for deer, elk, black bear and can be used for Moose. I would want something a little heavier, but if all you can afford is the one gun, then by all means, shoot with confidence, it will do fine.

    It is not a "woods" caliber and using the right kind of bullets on Moose size game would be crucial, but beyond that, you should be set.

    .257 Weatherby deliveres about 3,300 MV in a 120 grain and 7mm mag delivers about 2,850 in a 170 grain... 7mm = .280...
     
  16. Dark Helmet

    Dark Helmet Member

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    X-bullets might not be a bad idea in .257 Wby.
     
  17. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    I have not shot a moose with a .257 Weatherby. It is a cartridge I like very much, however, and I believe it would suffice for moose. I would not choose the Partition. It is, IMO, one of the world's great bullets, but the .257 will simply drive it beyond its design limitations.
    I would absolutely look into the X or the Triple Shock. With either of those bullets I would personally be comfortable taking on a moose with the little Weatherby.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2007
  18. 'Card

    'Card Member

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    If a .257 Weatherby was all I had, then sure - I'd hunt with it.

    But if I was buying a new rifle? No. It's not what I'd choose.

    Whether or not it will do the job is beside the point. Of course it will. The real question is whether or not it's the best choice for the job, and I don't think anyone would claim it is.

    Eliminate the guesswork and get yourself a .270, a .308, or (my personal choice) a .30-06 instead.
     
  19. joneb

    joneb Member

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    For the larger animals a 6.5x55 might be worth a look, in a minimal sort of way.
     
  20. Guntalk

    Guntalk Member

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    Weatherby Book

    The .257 Weatherby is a wonderful cartridge, but for a real sleeper, the .270 Weatherby is stunning.

    For a good rundown on the history of Weatherby and the rifles, grab a copy of "Weatherby: The Man, The Gun, The Legend."

    Tom Gresham, author
    "Weatherby: The Man, The Gun, The Legend."

    <grin>
     
  21. langenc

    langenc Member

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    Have a 257 and have NOT shot a moose with it.

    Have a 30-06 and have shot a moose with it-180 gr Silvertips-the old silver ones. Many hunters in Alaska use 180 for moose-and 150 for bous. If hunting bout they comprimise on 165 grs.
     
  22. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Well, I dunno. I suppose it would be nice to find a fellow who has shot a bunch of meese with a .257 to settle this once and for all. My experience with the .257 is that with X bullets it is capable of anything the .30-06 is -- and often with a bit more panache. And that's coming from a fellow who is deeply in love with the '06.

    "Best" choice for the job? Well, that's darn near impossible to quantify, IMO. As has been pointed out, the Scandahoovians seem to have nominated the 6.5x55, and it's hard to argue with success. Anything more than the 6.5 would seem to be more than necessary.

    What would I buy if I were after a gun exclusively for moose? Well, probably an original Rigby bolt rifle in .275 Rigb...er, 7x57. "Best"? Well, for me, anyway. Adequate? Yup. Just like the .257 Weatherby.;)
     
  23. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    It's in the same class as the .243, 6mm Rem, etc. Ok for deer, antelope and black bears, but too light for moose. Plus anything with the word Weatherby on it costs a bunch more. Midway wants $23.99 per 20 for the brass alone. $68.49 for 115 grain ballistic tip Nosler ammo.
    Look into a .260 Rem and up for moose.
     
  24. K.L.O.sako

    K.L.O.sako Member

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    hey, i got an idea, go hunting with the 257 and tell us how you did. if it's a total disaster we'll all know better next time. :p i went through this same thing a few weeks back when i asked the group about .22WMR and coyotes. truth is you could probably kill a moose with a .22 if you shot it in the earhole or somthing. the real question is, do you feel your hunting skills up to the task of hunting with a light for animal caliber ? :cool:
     
  25. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Here's a thought, do you reload? If you don't, you might not like the cost and availability (or lack there of) of Weatherby ammo, especially .257. I can find 7mm Mag and .308 anywhere in the US I'm at. Of course, I reload and don't care. :D

    Calibers like .308, 270, .30-06 are more economical and there is more a variety of factory loads out there. I just assumed you reload if you were interested in a Weatherby caliber.

    Yeah, I'm very impressed with the Barnes X bullets. I shoot 'em on hogs out of my .308. A good modern controlled expansion bullet can make a small caliber perform like a large calibler. :D the X bullet has another advantage. In any given bullet weight, it will have higher sectional density than an equal weight lead bullet. The 140 Barnes I shoot in the .308 has superior SD to the 150 Nosler ballistic tip, yet I can fired it faster due to its lighter weight and it shoots flatter as a result.
     
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