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A technical question on TRR8

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by omcf, Jul 12, 2014.

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  1. omcf

    omcf Member

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    Hello all-

    I have been a fan of Smith and Wesson revolvers for a while, my 1st being their 340 J-frame. Recently I got one of their performance center TRR8's, an N-frame 357.

    While examining the gun when I finally got it home, I noticed a small ball bearing in the front of the arm just below the ejector rod.

    I appreciate this is not the same thing as the legendary triple lock of old, but can someone explain the difference? Does this ball détente (?) on the TRR8 actually do anything? And, technically speaking, how is it different from the triple lock on the "44 Hand Ejector 1st Model- New Century"?

    Thanks in advance!
     

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  2. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    That ball bearing serves the same purpose as the old lock at the front of the ejector rod. It serves to keep the crane in the closed position while firing, thus keeping the cylinder lined up with the barrel.

    I admit to having some qualms about the idea but it seems to work OK and do the job at less cost and complexity than the front lock.

    The old Triple Lock has three locking places - the front of the ejector rod, the crane, and the rear of the cylinder. It seems that around 1907, S&W overestimated the forces that would be acting on the new .44 revolver and decided that a crane lock was needed. It wasn't, but it was expensive. So it was dropped and never brought back. (Yes, I know about the reports of problems in British use in WWI due to the complexity of the third lock, but I have little doubt the thing would have been dropped anyway; it was just too complicated and expensive, and mainly not needed.)

    So the new ball bearing system replaces two of the three locks of the "triple lock".

    Jim
     
  3. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    On the spelling -- if you're adding the accent on the first "e" and ending it with a third "e" then you pronounce it "day-taunt" with the emphasis on the second syllable and it means, "an easing of hostilities between warring nations."

    "Detent" (prounounced "dee-tent" with emphasis on "dee") means a catch or simple latch mechanism that holds moving parts aligned a certain way until you want them to move again.
     
  4. omcf

    omcf Member

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    Jim-

    So if this gun had one more detent on the end of the ejector rod (like my 340) it would be a modern version of a triple lock? Interesting...

    I was not sure if the ball bearing detent was anywhere near as good as the one 100 years ago, thanks for confirming.

    And Sam, the computer must have auto corrected for the political meaning.
     
  5. Raddogz

    Raddogz Member

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    On another note I would love to hear a range review on this gun. This is gun is on my immediate wishlist
     
  6. omcf

    omcf Member

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    Range review you say? And now the bad part....

    I have lusted after this revolver for 3 years or so. Finally found one at a price that was less than most wanted for it. Snapped it up, got it home, applied EEZ Ox, then took it to ranger next day. Shot 50 wadcutter match 38 spl, 25 rds of Hornady 125gr 357, 45 rds of Winchester 125gr pdx1.

    Loved the moon clips, loved the 8 rd capacity, loved the fact I could mount a light/laser combo up front. Kick on anything I shot was almost nil (at least compared to the 340). I still want to try some grizzly loads from Buffalo bore to see how bad they are.

    Accuracy was decent, but did not transform me into Jerry Miculek. I guess that old saw about a poor workman blames his tools applies here. No, to be fair, it was quite good, but I was distracted by another issue: no less than 12 rounds in the 80 or so I pulled the trigger on failed to fire. Even after re-cycling them, 4 did not fire at all. Upon examination, the firing pin is only coming out about 40% of what it should be. This is a brand new gun.

    So now I am wrestling with S&W customer service; wish me luck! A more comprehensive range session is in order once I send it back to get fixed, but I have to tell ya: this thing does feel great in the hand! Hope they can fix it.
     
  7. MartinS

    MartinS Member

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    You must be in that particular agony of consummation deferred, a bleak and empty landscape. But take heart, a shorty firing pin should be an easy, quick fix and then
    the trumpets shall sound and we will get our range report.
     
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