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anything better than Sno-Seal for leather?

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by Bull Nutria, Apr 14, 2013.

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  1. Bull Nutria

    Bull Nutria Member

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    i have been using this stuff on my leather gear for years, seems to do the job. anything better out there?

    Bull
     
  2. highorder

    highorder Member

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    Another lifetime Sno-Seal user here.

    I've never bothered to look too hard for another product. With a hair dryer and some time, Sno-Seal is excellent.
     
  3. ZeSpectre

    ZeSpectre Member

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    As a lifelong backpacker and hiker I've "tried" a lot of other stuff...and kept going back to Sno Seal.

    Seriously, that's about all I have to say on that.
     
  4. Silverado6x6

    Silverado6x6 Member

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    Well I tried this stuff out on my Redwing boots and it lasted longer than Snoseal, basically you need to find beeswax, mine is a cartridge tube like for a grease gun but is sold at the hardware store as a drill bit lubricant, its basically soft beeswax. I melted it in an old one gallon paint can and added about a pint of linseed oil and also some silicone spray, this mixture was originally for rewaxing my Australian drover coat but when I tried it on my boots it has lasted much longer than regular snoseal.

    Trick is to get the leather warm so it soaks up the hot very liquid mixture, a hot air gun also helps. It smells just a little bit, get the good linseed oil.
     
  5. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    Can you post the brand and store you buy it from? Someone gave me a tube of that some years ago and it was a great drill bit lube especially for little jobs that you wanted to keep clean and not have a bunch of oil spread around. I used it up and lost the tube and can't remember the brand.
     
  6. Silverado6x6

    Silverado6x6 Member

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    I bought it at a local place called Alaska Industrial Hardware in Wasilla, Alaska. I don't have the tube anymore, its a very fine grade of beeswax, I suppose you could use regular beeswax, basically which is what Snoseal is, but I honestly think its the addition of the boiled linseed oil that makes it stay more pliable instead of cracking and flaking such as when Snoseal ages. If you could try out getting several Snoseal tubs and then melting them down and adding the linseed oil it may give you good results.
     
  7. ZeSpectre

    ZeSpectre Member

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    If you have sno-seal cracking and flaking then I think you may be using too much. You are supposed to use as much as warm leather can absorb and then wipe off the excess once it cools a bit.
     
  8. Drail

    Drail Member

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    I have been using Sno seal since about 1975. It may not be the best "conditioner" for leather but it is the best waterproofing I have found and does not seem to soften or damage the leather with extensive use. As someone else stated, use a hairdryer on the lowest setting to "melt" it into the leather. It will darken light colored leathers. If it's "cracking and flaking off" then the leather has some kind of sealer that will not allow the Sno seal to penetrate so it is just building up on the surface. If you cannot clean that off then Sno seal is not going to help. If your leather was tanned with chromium salts and not oil I wouldn't introduce any linseed oil onto it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  9. GCBurner

    GCBurner Member

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    I like Pecard's Leather Dressing for slings, knife sheaths, and moccasins. It works particularly well on any antique type leather, like old bayonet sheaths and stacked leather washer knife handles. It gets absorbed in and preserves the leather, without leaving any sticky residue on the surface to attract dirt and grit.
    http://www.pecard.com/
     
  10. PowderKeg

    PowderKeg Member

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    Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP (Leather Preservative)

    Used to use Snow Seal until I found Obenauf's - only thing that hits my boots now. Using a hairdryer to pre-heat boots and/or warm the surface after application helps with penetration/absorption. Just warm them not scald/burn them. I've also been known to occasionally put a freshly cleaned pair in the oven on very low heat before treating them. May want to clear that with the Better Half first....

    I get it from The Supply Cache, but available elsewhere, just do a quick search.

    http://www.supplycache.com/prodinfo.asp?number=510-41251
     
  11. dab102999

    dab102999 Member

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    As a snowmobiler for over 30 years i use snow seal on all leather, even my suit...and there is a spray out there called snow proof that i use on everything else. I have even used it on leather also.
     
  12. Hillbilly75

    Hillbilly75 Member

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    Big fan of Sno-seal--mink oil not bad either.
     
  13. Byrd666

    Byrd666 Member

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    The only thing I've ever used on my long term stored leather is Neatsfoot oil. Now understand, that was 20+ years ago as well and with new technology and all some things are better. Some not so much.
     
  14. publiuss

    publiuss Member

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    I liked the old Gokey's leather treatment but you can't get it anymore. Every once in a while I will use some Neatsfoot, but 95% of the time it's sno seal. The leather really needs to be warm. I clean my boots and put them in the oven on the lowest setting and let them warm. Then remove and apply sno seal which will probably immediately soak in. Put back in oven so the leather will completely absorb. remove from oven and put another coat on. This allows the leather to become completely saturated and waterproof. I've never had to do more than 3 coats on very neglected boots.
     
  15. hoghunting

    hoghunting Member

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    Exactly my thoughts. I've spent many miles hiking up and down mountains and Sno Seal is the one sealer I know that will keep my feet dry.
     
  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Sno-Seal is good, but this is better.

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Foot...97980&WTz_l=Unknown;cat104797980;cat104724180

    Sno-Seal is about 65% bees wax and 35% mineral spirits. There are no petroleum products in the Obenaufs. Long term it is better for your boots. It seems to last longer as well.

    Neetsfoot oil is not a good choice for boots. It is good for softening up a baseball glove, but boots are supposed to have some stiffness to them. Neetsfoot oil breaks down the leather and does not waterproof for more than a few minutes.
     
  17. AndyJ

    AndyJ Member

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    Lifetime of neatsfoot oil Sno Pruf etc etc till I found this stuff several years back.

    Mom and Pop shop --all natural ingredients and it is amazing.

    Skidmore's
     
  18. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    I used to go through 1 or 2- 8oz cans every winter sealing various equipment and clothes back in New England. One of those things that was invented years and years ago that still works great that nothing has beat yet.
     
  19. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    Gor Tex doesn’t work well with wax based shoe polishes or bee’s wax water proofers such as Sno Seal or Camp Dry.

    On some of the newer boots that are made using glues instead of stitching the beeswax will actually soak into the leather and either delaminate the boot completely or cause it to be impossible to resole it.

    Using either Sno Seal or Camp Dry will void the warranty on Vasque Boots

    I use strictly Nik Wax water proofer on my Gor Tex boots
    http://www.nikwax.com/en-us/
     
  20. witchhunter

    witchhunter Member

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    Powderkeg got it with the Obenauf LP. it is the stuff.
     
  21. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    I don't doubt that it's good stuff but I wouldn't use it on Gore-Tex
     
  22. Toml

    Toml Member

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    Snow Seal with an occasional application of Meltonian Shoe Cream, a Kiwi product. The Melton adds a hard wax finish to leather.
     
  23. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Snow seal, nor any bees wax waterproofer will hurt gore-tex. The Gore-tex liner is basically a water resistant sock sewn inside the boot. No waterproofing materiaal will ever come in contact with it.

    Your boots will be waterproof, but less breathable. They also won't soak up a ton of water.

    Beeswax waterproofing will not hurt glued on soles either. If you get them too hot when applying, the heat will damage the glue.

    The Ninwax waterproofer does not waterproof nearly as well as either Sno-seal or Obenouf. It does a decent job for short term use, and it is very breatheable when used with gore-tex boots. It is especially useful when used with boots that are leather with fabric inserts where beeswax is useless. It has it's place, especially in modern lightweight boots. But for all leather boots Obenouf is the best, followed by Sno-seal.
     
  24. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    Sno Seal will ruin your boots

    Bees wax won't hurt the goretex but it will plug the pores in the leather so that the Goretex won't breathe, which means the sweat from your feet will stay right there , on your feet.

    Straight from the Gore-tex website
    http://www.gore-tex.com/remote/Satellite/content/care-center/washing-instructions#tab_2


    http://www.poudrewildernessvoluntee...aking-your-gear-last-forever?showall=&start=4


    Bees Wax isn't good however if you plan to resole your boots

    From the REI web site

    My job requires around 9 miles of walking every day If I lay out 300 bucks for a pair of hiking boots you bet your ass I want to be able to resole them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  25. Robert

    Robert Moderator Staff Member

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    We are not a boot forum.
     
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