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Bear Attack: Say a Prayer

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Wildalaska, Jul 15, 2003.

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  1. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    Follows is the sketch story, more details below;

    Brown bear mauls man at Russian River campground
    Campers advised to stay in cars until daylight because of danger

    The Associated Press

    (Published: July 15, 2003)
    A brown bear sow mauled a man early Tuesday morning at the Russian River Campground on the Kenai Peninsula.

    Dan Bigley, 25, was reported in critical condition at Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage.

    Doug Stockdale, spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service, said Bigley's address was listed as Girdwood but that he may be a seasonal worker there.

    A sow with two or three cubs charged several people near the stairs of the popular camping area at around 12:30 a.m., Stockdale said.

    Witnesses said several brown bears with cubs as well as a black bear were spotted nearby.

    Bigley was flown to Anchorage and arrived at about 3:20 a.m.

    Campers were encouraged to stay in their vehicles until daylight.

    The Forest Service and Alaska State Troopers discouraged fishing on the river until daylight. They also posted warning signs at the campground, trailheads and the ferry that crosses the Kenai River just below the Russian River.
    _______________________

    I heard this AM that the attack occured becasue the victims dog chased the bear, then of course revered itslef and came back... I also heard that he did not have a weapon or at least could not use it.

    And before I hear a litany of "he should have had a gun" etc and all sorts of second guessing, I would note that per a conversation I had with someone in the medical field this am, that the victim besides having horrific facial injuries, has lost BOTH his eyes. Truly a tragedy and he deserves our prayers.

    I for one am going to the Russian River this week, I am carrying a shotgun instead of a pistol. Hopefully the bioligists will scare the bear off....

    WildAlaska
     
  2. spacemanspiff

    spacemanspiff Senior Member

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    i'm going to the kenai to do some dipnetting. doubt bears make it down to the mouth of the river. but i'll have a firearm nearby.

    why is it local residents that always encounter bears like this? i think bears are committing hate crimes upon us. they hardly ever do this kind of thing to tourists!

    sorry to be flippant. regards to the man who was mauled.
     
  3. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    Another one of those "rare" bear attacks ... :rolleyes:
     
  4. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    There's a reason why we're suppose to be on the top of the food chain and not part of the food chain. Prayer said for this woe begotten man.
     
  5. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    Sows seem to go for the eyes. I even recall a BLACK bear sow slashing I guy's eyes a few years back, and it's unusual for them to attack at all. They must have learned to "fight dirty" to survive against the larger bruins.

    I've seen these guys move, and even thick devil's club won't slow them down much. The shoot through it like a torpedo. The fellow in question might not have had any time to react. If I ever get charged by a sow, and can't get to my piece in time, my plan is to cover my head with my hands and drop, lying perfectly still. That seems to work with them. Of course, it doesn't often work with predatory black bears or angry brownie boars.

    The dog thing doesn't surprise me. The one time I got run down by a moose, it was because some dogs made him mad and he took it out on me. That was a memorable experience! It reminds me of what an old timer up here told me. Keep a dog you don't like around for bear protection, along with a .38. When the bear comes down the trail chasing him, shoot the dog with the .38.
     
  6. spacemanspiff

    spacemanspiff Senior Member

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    i read somewhere taht black bears in general wont attack because you are food to them, but because they like to use you as a big chewtoy that flops and flails around. so playing 'dead' would cause a black bear to get bored.
    and brown bears/grizzlies are more prone to attack because you are food for them, so fighting back was advised.

    this is all moot if its a sow with cubs, she'll attack anything to protect her young.
     
  7. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    I assume that the drop and play dead technique works with sows becasue all they want to do is remove the threat so they can escape with their cubs.

    WildnocommenthereAlaska
     
  8. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    Heres the follow up...

    Grizzly mauls Russian River angler
    CRITICAL: Bear-human encounters escalate, leave four bears dead.

    By CRAIG MEDRED
    and DOUG O'HARRA
    Anchorage Daily News

    (Published: July 16, 2003)
    RUSSIAN RIVER -- A 25-year-old angler seriously mauled by a brown bear here early Tuesday was being treated at Anchorage's Providence Alaska Medical Center as state and federal officials tried to decide what to do about a growing bear crisis along the state's most popular salmon stream.

    Daniel Bigley was just feet from a stairway that leads to the Grayling parking lot in the U.S. Forest Service's popular Russian River Campground when he was apparently jumped by a brown bear sow with two cubs, according to U.S. Forest Service officials.

    He was in critical condition Tuesday night, having had part of his face torn off and losing at least one eye, according to witnesses.

    Details of the attack were sketchy, but retired Col. Frank Valentine, a former member of the U.S. Army Rangers, said he and his wife, Celeste, were settling into bed in their trailer about 100 yards from the parking lot at 12:30 a.m. when a car horn started honking.

    Moments later, he said, a young man and a young woman came pounding on his door.

    "They were in shock,'' Valentine said. "They were very, very anxious and scared to death.''

    They told him of the mauling and asked for help. Though it was still light enough to see, Valentine grabbed a flashlight and headed for the stairs.

    He said the two young people told him they'd been standing near the top of the two-tiered stairway when they heard shouting below. Then three bears -- what appeared to be a sow grizzly and two cubs -- bounded up the steps.

    The couple, Valentine said, turned, ran and dove through an open window into the back of a Chevrolet Blazer. The bears ran past and back into the woods. The couple started blowing the horn to attract attention before going for help.

    When Valentine returned with the couple to the head of the stairway, he sent the woman to wait in a nearby restroom built of concrete blocks, while he and the young man headed toward the river.

    About 20 to 30 feet from where the trail from Grayling meets a trails that runs along the water, they found Bigley and a friend down in tall grass and brush. The friend was trying to stop Bigley's head from bleeding. At first, Valentine thought Bigley was dead.

    "He had severe trauma,'' said the Vietnam veteran on vacation here from his Georgia home. "I've been in combat, and I've never seen anyone with those type of injuries who has survived. It looked like he had been blasted in the face.''

    But when Valentine checked on Bigley, he found the man conscious, his pulse good and his airway clear. Valentine called 911 on his cell phone.

    "There really wasn't anything we could do down there except wait to transport him,'' he said.

    As Valentine and the others waited, more volunteers trickled in -- a man with a shotgun to keep watch in case the bears returned; another arrived with a first-aid kit started cutting off Bigley's waders. People with flashlights showed up to light the campground road for emergency crews.

    By the time Cooper Landing Emergency Medical Technician Carrie Williams arrived, the community's volunteer firefighters, Alaska State Troopers and more than a half dozen others had gathered. She described the scene as "chaotic,'' but manageable.

    "Thank God he was on the stair side'' of the Russian River, she said.

    Williams helped stabilize Bigley. He was then lashed to a backboard. Volunteers carried him up the stairs to a waiting ambulance. The ambulance took him out of the campground and about a mile down the Sterling Highway to a wide spot in the road near the Resurrection Pass Trail head.

    A Providence Lifeflight helicopter waited there to fly Bigley to Anchorage.

    Friends described Bigley as a newcomer from Arizona with a yearning to discover America's last great wilderness. He had a degree in environmental sciences, said Girdwood neighbor Jennifer White, and was working as a counselor at Alaska Children's Services in Anchorage.

    A co-worker there, Brad Precosky, the well-known Alaska mountain runner, said he'd just sold Bigley a plot of land with a cabin in Bear Valley above Anchorage. Precosky said Bigley was full of enthusiasm about living in the mountains and imagined skiing down some of the gullies near his new home.

    "I had a good feeling about him," Precosky said.

    "He's done quite a bit of guiding in river rafting and hiking," White said. "He's not the kind of guy who would have been out there causing a big ruckus.''

    It appeared, according to authorities, that Bigley simply stumbled into trouble on his return from an evening of fishing. He was following a trail used by thousands of people every summer. Valentine had just come up the same trail, carrying a limit of three red salmon.

    "I had walked that same path maybe 30 minutes before they did,'' he said, "I walked it alone, but I sang the whole way. Just for the grace of God, it could have happened to me.''

    Bear problems along the river have escalated since the middle of last month when the first of two annual returns of red salmon arrived late. Kenai Peninsula area wildlife biologist Jeff Selinger with Fish and Game said that in recent days there have been reports of several grizzly bear sows with cubs in the area, as well as a number of black bears.

    Problems grew serious a week ago when an angler was charged by a brown bear sow with three cubs. He shot at her to protect himself. The fate of that bear was unknown until two days later when the cubs were reported up a tree in the Russian River Campground.

    The rotting carcass of their mother was found not far away. Alaska Department of Fish and Game regional wildlife supervisor Jeff Hughes said biologists subsequently decided to euthanize the less-than-50-pound cubs because no zoo or other wildlife facility could be found to take them.

    It was not, Hughes added, an easy decision. Fish and Game, he noted, is in the middle of a program trying to preserve a Kenai brown bear population believed to be threatened by increasing development.

    "We've got to do a better job,'' he said. "Maybe we need to provide the bears with a buffer.''

    In the aftermath of the mauling, the U.S. Forest Service has closed the Russian River Trail and the banks of the river from the falls to the confluence from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. through July 25.

    The Forest Service has no authority to prohibit fishing, so anglers could walk up the river and fish. Anglers will, however, be unable to drive to the Russian River Campground, get a parking space and walk down to fish.

    Even with the sun high and hot on Tuesday afternoon, a trio of yearling grizzlies was busy making trouble in plain sight near the confluence of the Russian and Kenai rivers.

    "We've got ourselves a messy situation,'' Selinger said, "a situation that has the potential for a lot of problems.''

    Kenai refuge officer Kevin Shinn said one of the yearlings appeared particularly aggressive. It came out of the woods near the Kenai River ferry, he said, grabbed a backpack and then started looking for more.

    "They continued to work downstream,'' he said, "working from stringer to cooler, whatever they could find.''

    Anglers expressed varying degrees of concern. At the top of the Grayling stairs, Dave Howard, a superintendent at Costco in Anchorage, and his father, Dave Sr., were geared up to go fishing, bears or no bears.

    Veterans of this river, they figured they could get along with the bears. The last time fishing, the younger Dave said, "we saw four grizzlies and a black. We stayed away and gave ground."

    "Hey, this is their river,'' added Dave Sr. "These guys were here before we were here. It's their fish.''

    ________________________________________

    Bet we see some one shooting their friend becasue they think its a bear..

    The solution?

    Close the whole river or rubber bullet them!
     
  9. Keith

    Keith Member

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    Aftermath:

    Friends describe fishing trip turned nightmare
    RUSSIAN RIVER: Bear with cubs "really aggressive" just before mauling.


    By CRAIG MEDRED
    Anchorage Daily News

    (Published: July 19, 2003)
    With 25-year-old Daniel Bigley still fighting for his life at Providence Alaska Medical Center on Friday, details were beginning to emerge about the Tuesday morning bear attack that turned a pleasant fishing trip to the popular Russian River into a nightmare.

    Bigley's friend and fishing companion, Jeremy Anderson, said he was at the top of a stairway leading to the Grayling parking lot in the Russian River Campground around 11:35 p.m. Monday when he heard that a brown bear had been spotted on the river below the bluff there.

    The 22-year-old student at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and his 20-year-old girlfriend, Emily Maasch, had been fishing with Bigley and another young man on the river only half an hour before. They were waiting near the parking lot for their friends to join them.

    From that spot overlooking the river, Anderson said, "we saw someone taking pictures. So we hurried up and went over there because Emily had never seen a bear before.''

    Anderson himself had a seen a few. He spent last year working for the concessionaire that runs the Russian River Campground, a place regularly visited by bears. And this summer he is rowing rafts on the Kenai River for a Cooper Landing tourism business. Bears are a common sight along that river.

    What Anderson and Maasch saw from the bluff Monday night was "this 800 to 900 pound grizzly bear with, I think, it had three cubs. When we saw the bear, it was already really aggressive ... it was running down the middle of the river, shaking its head.''

    Anderson had no idea what might have upset the bear. The possibilities are endless. It could have been spooked by a fisherman downstream on the Russian. It could have had a bad encounter with another bear or bears. It could simply have been worried about the cubs, which Anderson said disappeared into the brush along the near bank of the river while their mother made a fuss.

    "It was in the middle of the river, running down the river,'' Anderson said. "I saw it shaking its head. It was in one of those very aggressive moods.

    "The cubs were along the shoreline that we couldn't see. Then the momma veered off. The momma veered toward the trail.

    "That's when I had the bad feeling,'' he said.

    The Russian River angler's trail, toward which the bear had turned, is at midsummer one of the most heavily trafficked trails in Alaska.

    Though it was now late at night, Anderson noted, "we'd seen some people going down (that trail) right about 20 minutes before it happened.''

    Still, he wasn't particularly worried about their friends -- Bigley and Bigley's roommate, John. The roommate, Anderson and other friends of Bigley said, has been traumatized by the bear attack, and they fear anything written about the incident might put him under more stress, so they asked that his last name not be used.

    John was only feet away from Bigley when the bear attacked, grabbing him by the face. No one is sure how long the mauling continued, seconds or minutes, those involved said. Everyone familiar with the situation said it was obvious to John then that Bigley would never be able to see again -- if he lived at all.

    Bigley's condition Friday remained critical.

    His parents are in Anchorage with him now, praying he will survive so they can take him back to his Carmel, Calif., home to recover and begin to build a new life.

    Anderson said it is all hard to believe.

    "John and Dan are very experienced in the outdoors,'' he said. "More (so) than 80 or 90 percent of the people who go down there" to the Russian. If someone was to have a problem with a bear, Anderson didn't expect it to be these two.

    But that night he was beginning to worry what this bear might do because it was acting so strangely. Most bears seen at the Russian are afraid of people. A few act curious. Occasionally there are those that behave aggressively to try to get food or take fish.

    But this one acted like it was angry.

    "I really did have a feeling in my head that something wasn't right,'' Anderson said. "Five or 10 seconds later, I heard the screams.''

    It was shortly after midnight, early Tuesday morning. At first, he thought someone was simply making noise to shoo away a bear. He did not know that Bigley and John were on the trail there. But he quickly realized something had gone badly wrong.

    "It registered with me,'' he said, "and I said to Emily, 'those aren't screams. Those are cries for help.' ''

    Together, Anderson and Maasch crept to the edge of the bluff to see if they could spot anything in the dusk that was slowly sliding into darkness.

    "We were very cautious walking up there,'' he said.

    When nothing was visible from the bluff, Anderson told Maasch to keep watch from there and he would descended the stairs that switchback down the side of the hill. He started down, but didn't get far.

    At the first corner, he said, he ran into two cubs that he described as small enough that "I could have cradled them in my arms."

    The cubs, he said, were "about 10 feet away from me and started hissing and coming toward me.''

    Anderson started backing up. About the same time, he said, Emily saw the sow below the bluff and shouted a warning that the animal was coming up the steep hillside.

    "We didn't have anywhere to go,'' Anderson said, "so I told her to run for the bathroom.''

    The Forest Service outhouses at the Russian River are concrete structures capable of stopping a bear, but Anderson and Maasch never made it there.

    "We wouldn't have made it to the bathrooms,'' Anderson said, "because the bear was only two steps behind us. (But) at that point, we saw a window of opportunity, which happened to be the Blazer.''

    A Chevrolet Blazer had, fortuitously, pulled into the Grayling parking lot only 15 minutes before, Anderson said, and, even more fortuitously, its rear window was smashed out.

    "I pushed (Emily) in,'' Anderson said. Then he dove in behind her.

    "The bear was two feet behind me,'' he added. "It was growling and shaking its head. Then it started circling the Blazer, growling and shaking its head.

    "We were freaked out, you know.''

    The bear made a few turns around the Blazer, but didn't try to get inside, before heading for the woods. Anderson and Maasch started honking the car horn, thinking that would bring help. When it didn't, Anderson and Maasch hopped out and went for the nearest campsite.

    "Campsite 81,'' he said.

    Retired U.S. Army Ranger Col. Frank Valentine, a tourist from Georgia, answered the banging on his door to find a distraught young couple.

    "They were in shock,'' Valentine said. "They were very, very anxious and scared to death.''

    "I told him, 'We need your cell phone, and we need a gun,'' Anderson said. "I told him I was sure there was a bear mauling.''

    A phone call was immediately made to 911 to alert authorities, after which Anderson and Valentine headed for the scene of the mauling.

    "We started hearing the screams,'' Valentine said, "so I responded. I noticed it was John's voice.''

    Anderson and Valentine found John cradling Bigley's badly bleeding head. It looked, Vietnam veteran Valentine said, "like (Bigley) had been blasted in the face."

    John, according to Anderson, said he and Bigley had been coming up the trail from the direction of the Kenai River with Bigley's dog, Maya, when the dog went alert.

    "They were talking,'' Anderson said. "They were making noise. They were laughing. But about 10 seconds before the attack, the dog got skittish and barked. They heard a rustle through the brush where the island is.''

    That island is just upstream from what Russian River anglers know as the "cottonwood hole,'' one of the more popular fishing hot spots between the Graying parking lot and the Kenai. The island upstream from it is small, maybe 10 feet wide and 50 feet long. Anderson thinks the cubs might have been on the island while the sow was in the river, but added "this is the part I'm a little foggy on.''

    He does know, from talking to John on the night of the attack, that the sow came out of the brush near the island, just feet from where the riverside angler trail intersects a trail that cuts off to the stairway to the Grayling parking lot.

    "Maya, the dog, jetted down to the (Kenai-Russian) confluence and actually brought back two people,'' Anderson said. "John was able to duck in the bushes. The bear ran about two feet past him and grabbed Dan.''

    In a matter of minutes, if not seconds, the bear's jaws had pushed the young fisherman close to death.

    "I don't even want to get into details of that,'' Anderson said. "John and Dan and I are close friends. I will give props to everyone that was helping out. This was one of those things I hope I never have to deal with again.''

    Anderson is now trying to figure out how to establish a recovery fund for Bigley. Efforts were to start today at the "Festival of the Forest'' in Cooper Landing.

    A half-time employee at Alaska Children's Services, Bigley is fortunate to have some health insurance.

    "Our policy is that half-time employees (do have insurance). ... So he's covered by our health insurance,'' said Jim Maley, executive director there. "We're all relieved about it."

    Maley said Bigley was working as an activity therapist with troubled kids.

    "He worked with, and hopefully will at some point again work with, kids on a one-to-one basis,'' said Maley, who added that when he met Bigley he was impressed by the young man's "positive outlook. He was extremely positive and gifted in working with children.

    "Our thoughts and prayers are with him now.''
     
  10. PileDriver

    PileDriver Member

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    the idea here would be to shoot the damn thing way before he got close enough to maul you
     
  11. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    I knew someone was gonna say it...

    Keith, I think Ill leave the response to you.....

    Wild:cuss: Alaska
     
  12. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    IMHO, no fish are worth this kind of risk.

    At the very least, every group should have one person with a 45-70 on lookout at all times.

    =============

    Just like some people ... the sow went "postal"
     
  13. ACP

    ACP Member

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    Wildalaska

    You know, I wrote a reply yesterday asking folks to remember this thread when some ... uh, less-than-informed person... suggests carrying a hi-cap 9mm or whatever to defend themselves in a bear attack. Then I deleted it. Now I see there was a need for it.

    PileDriver, you need to do a search for "bear," either here or on TheFiringLine.com. Read some of Keith Rogan's first-hand accounts, hear from Alaska Fish & Game types, look at pictures of Brownies. You don't "shoot through" a charging bear like Mel Gibson or Will Smith. It's not quite that simple.
     
  14. PileDriver

    PileDriver Member

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    i've hunted bear many times and am well aware of how to kill one, having killed several. i'm also aware that you don't "shoot through" one. you also don't wait to fire on one that's charging.
     
  15. Keith

    Keith Member

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    Well, this actually sounds like one of those rare and unusual cases where they had plenty of warning that the bear was going to "go off". They watched it run up and down and work itself into a frenzy. My guess is that the bear simply lost track of its cubs temporarily. They were on the bank near those fisherman while she was out in the river.

    With or without a gun, I'd have been up a tree before the bear reached its boiling point - assuming there are trees along the river there. Anyone know?

    These cases are just horrible. This poor guy was new here, but his companions weren't. They should have been better prepared.


    Keith
     
  16. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    Watch it!

    "the idea here would be to shoot the damn thing way before he got close enough to maul you"

    "you also don't wait to fire on one that's charging."

    Hmm. Well if you're just shooting every bear you see because you're scared it's called "poaching" and we don't like it when people do that. We put them in prison here. Alaska is no place to be if you feel the need to shoot wildlife on sight
    :D
     
  17. Keith

    Keith Member

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    >>>>you're just shooting every bear you see because you're scared it's called "poaching"<<<<<

    Ha! I've been called every kind of idiot you can imagine for trying to explain that to people!
    Most people visiting Alaska are better off with pepper spray - for two reasons - 1: They aren't good enough with a firearm (or don't have the right firearm), or 2: They simply can't grasp the fact that it isn't proper to blast away every time a bear is "too close".

    Keith
     
  18. Obiwan

    Obiwan Member

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    The latest advice from those "in the know" is that playing dead is not the best idea.

    Keep in mind that many of "those in the know" seem like they prefer the bear to win???

    Popular opinion today is that you should stand your ground...or climb a tree....OC is a great idea...at leat for black bears in the lower 48

    Running just makes you more attractive as a plaything...shooting them with most handguns..and some longguns just pisses them off!

    I realize that this is all much easier said than done...and were I armed...I would tend towards shooting the charging bear.

    Just like bad people....avoidance is your safest bet.
     
  19. PileDriver

    PileDriver Member

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    is that what i said?? i said a CHARGING bear
     
  20. Keith

    Keith Member

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    Grizzlies "charge" quite frequently. This is called a "false charge" and is part of the threat display you'll see quite often. The problem is that if you then shoot, the "false charge" is likely to turn into a real charge that kills you. Or, almost as bad - leaves a wounded grizzly behind that will end up ACTUALLY threatening someones life long after you are gone.

    You might be good enough to hit a target the size of a grapefruit (a bears brain), moving and bouncing towards you at 35 mph, but most people aren't. Wounding the bear is very likely to set off a real mauling, either at that moment or long afterwards...
    In some places (like Kodiak and the Alaska Peninsula) you might encounter a dozen grizzlies a day on a fishing trip. It's just unthinkable that anyone would shoot every bear that made a threat display. You'd end up in jail and rightfully so.

    You can actually tell a threat display from a real charge, though in this case (totally unarmed, in the dark) knowing how wouldn't have been much help. Bears making a threat display have their ears up, teeth bared, and are generally making a lot of noise - teeth clicking, grunting, etc. Bears that are actually attacking make no noise, they just lay the ears down and come for you. The barking dog isn't the one that bites you...
    And trust me, the case above is quite rare in that someone actually SAW the bear before the attack. 90% of the time the bear bounds out of the brush just feet away and nails you.

    You have to remember that some of us have to live here. And every year we are left with wounded, gimpy, starving, angry bears to deal with after the tourists leave. And 99.% of the time, that bear didn't have to be shot.
    Fish or hike with a partner, one with a heavy rifle or shotgun (slugs) and one with pepper spray. If a bear gets too close, zap him with pepper spray while the other guy covers him with the firearm. Resume fishing.

    Keith
     
  21. Keith

    Keith Member

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    Oh, as for "playing dead" - grizzlies (almost) always attack for territorial reasons or to remove a threat to cubs. Playing dead is the right thing to do if it gets you down. Resistance is suicide because you are just proving that you are still a threat.

    Black bears (almost) always attack for food. Playing dead is suicide.
     
  22. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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  23. jade

    jade Member

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    i've been told this as well.


    i got the quote below from the Forest Service's website for my particular area.

    "FIGHT BACK If a black bear attacks you. Black bears have been driven away when people have fought back with rocks, sticks, binoculars and even their bare hands."

    http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/psicc/bears.shtml

    it's at the very bottom of the page.

    jade
     
  24. PileDriver

    PileDriver Member

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    45



    again, i didn't say shoot every bear. it's pretty obvious that the bear in question should have been shot.









    assuming one would stop firing after only one shot. i wouldn't










    i'm real skeptical of posts that quote stats with nothing to back them up.








    lol...that won't piss him off at all eh?
     
  25. Keith

    Keith Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    1,784
    Location:
    Kodiak, Alaska
    Wild,

    Have you ever noticed how few Alaskan bear attacks make it into the national press? That guy in Colorado got just a little nip on the head and it was like you'd never hear the end of it... People here get ripped apart or killed and there's not a line in the national press.

    Is it that Alaskan bear maulings aren't considered news - to be expected?

    Keith
     
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