Quantcast

Canadian vs. United States victimization

Discussion in 'Activism Discussion and Planning' started by Stephen Maize, Jan 10, 2020.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    This is from the Canadian victimization survey.

    In 1999, 8.0% suffered physical assaults. 4.3%, 2.0% were by strangers. 2.3% were by acquaintance. The rest were by family or others. In 2004, 7.4% suffered physical assaults. 3.8% were by strangers. 3.6% were Acquaintance,family or others. In 2009, 7.9% suffered physical assaults. 4.0% were by strangers and 2.4% by acquaintance. 6.4%, the rest were by family or others. In 2014, it was 4.8% who suffered physical assaults. 2.3% were by strangers and 1.6% by acquaintance. 3.9%, the rest were family or others.

    I thought I would share with you guys.

    For burglary, Canada’s rate was 4.8% in 1999. 4.7% in 2009. 3.3% in 2014. For the United States,In 1999 it was 3.4%, in 2009 it was 2.6% and in it was 2.3% in 2014.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
    taliv likes this.
  2. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    55,596
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Thank you for providing that information. Violence, especially homicide, data from a neighbor state like Canada is important to know here since the homicide rates for the US and Canada are often compared.

    Our equivalent is the Uniform Crime Report published by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the detail in the information is good. How detailed does the Canadian Victimization data get for homicides?

    By way of example, for the US we can see that between 2017 and 2018 murder/nonneglent manslaughter dropped 6%.

    upload_2020-1-10_7-32-8.png

    Our rate of murder/nonneglegent manslaughter rate overall was 5/100,000 or 0.005% with a dramatic difference when the population unit reached 250,000 vs. lower rates below that (especially below 100,000).

    upload_2020-1-10_7-38-4.png

    Does the Canadian data have enough detail to track what type of weapon is used in homicides like the US data does? We can see that more people are killed with knives than rifles overall and state by state.

    upload_2020-1-10_7-27-55.png
     
  3. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Victimization surveys do not count homicide.
     
  4. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Just search Canadian victimization Survey 1999, Canadian victimization survey 2004, Canadian victimization survey 2009, Canadian victimization survey 2014. Your equivalent is the National Crime Victimization Survey.
     
  5. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    hso, the UCR that you provided is for police recorded crime. The Canadian UCR is equivalent to the American UCR. Just search Police-reported crime statistics in Canada,2018. Or Police-reported crime statistics in Canada.
     
  6. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    55,596
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
  7. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    I got the Canadian vs. United States homicide rate from 2000 to 2018 from statista.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
  9. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
  10. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
  11. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Yes, it does
     
  12. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Used in violence, not homicides
     
  13. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    92.1% of Canadians did not suffer any type of violent crime. 90% felt safe after dark walking around in their neighbourhoods, according to the 2014 survey.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2020
  14. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    55,596
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    I would wager that the number would be slightly lower for Americans.
     
  15. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    In 1993,86% felt safe walking in their area. In 1999, 91% felt safe in their area.
     
  16. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
  17. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,047
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Let's rephrase this more accurately.
    In 2009, it was 90% of the infinitesimally small number of Canadians who answered a poll who felt safe in their area.

    In 2014, it was 88% percent of the infinitesimally small number of Canadians who answered a poll who felt safe in their area.

    In the United States, the percentage of the infinitesimally small number of people who answered a poll who didn’t feel safe in their area was at 72%.
     
  18. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    33,000 people took part in the survey. That is NOT infinitesimally small.
     
  19. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    55,596
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    The Canadian data is reasonably reliable since the sample population was large enough, but a Gallup poll on how people "feel" isn't the same quality of data nor even the same data since the inputs are different on how people feel. Certainly something worth mentioning.

    How people "feel" is important socially and politically since it drives how they vote. People that feel concerned about being a victim in a mass shooting aren't logically working from the data showing they're more likely to be hit by lightning. People who feel concerned about "assault weapons" aren't looking at the data showing they're far more likely to be killed with a bludgeon or knife or someone's hands/feet than any type of rifle (and when you look at state data where they type of rifle is parsed you may not even find a semiauto used some years). They feel that way because they've been trained to by the 15 minute repeating news blasting at them from dozens of direction anytime anything happens involving some rare, but monstrous incident. They're being conditioned to feel that they're at risk or their loved ones are at risk without looking at the data or thinking about it.

    Considering the population distributions in Canada (80+% live in urban areas) I "feel" that this is a factor for violence and homicide rates and how Canadians feel about it. It certainly is in the US with 62% of Americans in urban areas. If we look at homicide rates here, just a handful of cities drive the US homicide rate up so high. If we took St. Louis, San Juan, New Orleans, Baltimore, and Detroit out of the data the US drops to Western European levels for homicide rates.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
  20. entropy

    entropy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    9,548
    Location:
    G_d's Country, WI
    As Robert told you in the last thread of yours he locked, 'sharing' data with us isn't Activism. I'm sure he'll be along shortly...
     
  21. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    Hso,If you look at the Canadian Victimization Survey 2014 on people (who are now adults) who were sexually abused or not sexually abused before age 15. Physical assaults are 2.3% for abused and 2.4% for people who were not abused. The total for both groups would be 4.8%. Physical assaults for Canada in 2014 is 4.8%. (Okay, 4.7%)
     
  22. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    768EBC5F-E0EB-4C73-A36F-888185EE5CF7.jpeg

    The top is Canada and the bottom is the USA. This shows the rate of burglary. The first two numbers for Canada are the years 1988 and 1991. The numbers are due to rounding. The numbers to the right, especially. 1.3% was reported for Canada in 2010, it is the burglary with entry only. This number is all I could find. The numbers for all other years is burglary with entry and attempted burglary.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
  23. Stephen Maize

    Stephen Maize member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2019
    Messages:
    92
    My first post relates to the burglary rate using the United States Criminal Victimization Survey.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
  24. bearcreek

    bearcreek Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,047
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Since my statement about it got deleted I'll ask a question. How is a poll that leaves out 99.92% of a population "reliable"? I don't see how that's possible.
     
  25. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    55,596
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    If "physical assault" includes threats as opposed to physical force then there's a huge problem with the data quality.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice