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Case Life?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by GentlemanScholar, Jan 8, 2011.

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  1. GentlemanScholar

    GentlemanScholar Member

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    Just getting into reloading and I was wondering what kind of case life can I expect from .222 Rem and .300 Savage brass with factory to just above factory loads? Nothing really hot. Trying to determine how much brass I need to have on hand. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    If you reload like I do and process in batches, then I'd suggest taking the number you want to shoot per week and triple it. So if you want to shoot 10 rounds a week, then 30 cases will do you. I always have a batch just back from the range in the tumbler. Another batch being sized and trimmed. And then another being loaded.

    Of course you'll always be picking up brass, or looking for it on sale. As the brass approaches EOL then it will start to split out. If you tightly control your batches then the whole lot of 10 could split out in the same range session. If you are always introducing range pickups and not that picky about heritage, then culls will be a continuous 1 or 2 per range session.

    Life per case is dependent upon numerous variables, but the main one is the stress of the load. Hot load = Short life.
     
  3. GentlemanScholar

    GentlemanScholar Member

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    Good advice. Since 222 is a smaller case I was wondering if the brass would last longer than a bigger cartridge like the 300 savage? Especially since 222 ammo/brass is so expensive.
     
  4. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...wondering if the brass would last longer than..." Nope. It's the load that matters. With those two cartridges, buy as much as you can afford when you can. Neither is exactly easy to come by these days.
    Midway wants $34.99 per 100 for brass Remington .222. $137.99 per 500. $28.99 per 100, $136.99 per 500 for Winchester.
    $29.49 per 50, $246.99 per 500 for Winchester .300 Savage. $49.99 per 100 for Remington. Not sold by 500. 1,000 is $428.99(ouch).
    Midway isn't the least expensive place though. Do a net search.
     
  5. Steve Marshall

    Steve Marshall Member

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    Within reason, it's not how hot you load but how well the brass fits your chamber. As to expense? Use .223 and .308 brass. Just resize in your dies and trim. Much cheaper and just as good.
     
  6. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    Depends on the pressures loaded at and the fit to the chamber. .222 runs at somewhat lower pressure than .223, unless you load it up hot, which it sounds like you want to, but either way you should get 5 to 8, and maybe more, firings on it. Dunno about .300 Savage.

    Partial full length size to fit the chamber and case life will be extended since the brass will be worked less.
     
  7. cheygriz

    cheygriz member

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    I load 5.56X45MM to duplicate military M193 Ball, and I usually get 8-10 loads per case. Never loaded .300 Savage, but pressures are similar to original .30-06 factory loads, so 8-10 should be a reasonable expectation. :D
     
  8. GentlemanScholar

    GentlemanScholar Member

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    Thank you griz. Would it really be as easy as running 223 brass through the sizer and triming the neck? I shoot a lot of PPU 5.56 x 45mm so would the thicker case walls and annealing pose any problems or make the resizing any more difficult?
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Is your .300 Savage a Model 99 lever-action?

    If so, brass life will not be all that great as the 99 action allows a lot of case stretch. And the case must be FL sized every time for use in the lever-action.

    Your case life will be determined with an L-bent paper clip and reaching down inside to feel for a stretch ring.

    When you can feel it, the case is just about ready to suffer a case head seperation.

    rc
     
  10. GentlemanScholar

    GentlemanScholar Member

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    Thank you RC. Yeah, they are model 99s. Its a good thing I have plenty of brass for those.
     
  11. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    with an L-bent paper clip and reaching down inside to feel for a stretch ring

    Like this.....

    [​IMG]
     
  12. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Dang Walkalong!
    I didn't know you were an Artest' too!

    That is a real good drawing, and a great tool selection to go with it!!
    I may have to steal it sometime!! :D

    rc
     
  13. cheygriz

    cheygriz member

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    I've never tried to neck down 5.56X45 ro .222 but since the .222 was the "parent" case that the 5.56 was designed from it shouldn't be a problem.

    I wouldn't bother with annealing since 5.56 is so close to .222 and cheap and readily available, but I would check neck thickness closely after forming and trimming, and if necessary inside ream or outside turn (preferable, IMHO) to makle sure the case necks were "in spec."
     
  14. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    I have formed a few .223 cases to .222, and it works well. Trimming is a pain. I have two .222 trim dies, and they work fine, it's just slow and a real pain. Double check a loaded round to make sure they are not to fat in the neck area. Should be OK though.

    I broke down and bought .222 brass. I till have a box of 500 brass left over from when I had a 222. Might come in handy someday.
     
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