Quantcast

Cast iron lead dipper...?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by the Black Spot, Jul 1, 2016.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. the Black Spot

    the Black Spot Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,118
    Location:
    central arkansas
    Is there a way to make the inside of the spout smoother so it pours smokther and quicker?
     
  2. joem1945

    joem1945 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    Messages:
    2,017
    Get a Dremel tool and sanding drums. That should work well.
     
  3. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,105
    Location:
    Springfield, MO
    I would try sandpaper wrapped around a wooden dowel, followed by steel wool.

    If you keep the ladle hot by letting it sit in the molten lead, accumulation should be minimal even without smoothing.
     
  4. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    10,712
    Location:
    USA.
    Just cut a small notch in the spout part. Use high heat. Let dipper sit in the alloy/lead a while.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 1, 2016
  5. mdi

    mdi Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Messages:
    2,622
    Location:
    Orygun!
    You may not ever get cast iron to a smooth surface, but the above answers will do as good a job as possible. I would use crocus cloth working down from course to fine (sandpaper is usually used on wood or cleaning for painting). If the cast iron is of good quality it won't be too porous and you can get a good smooth surface. And the posters above are right about keeping the ladle hot...
     
  6. CANNONMAN

    CANNONMAN member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2014
    Messages:
    838
    Drill it. Place the dipper in a vice. Choose the size pour spout you want. Pick the drill bit that matches the size and drill 1/4 to 1/2 the thickness of the ladle at an angle. Need help? take a piece of strap steel. Drill the angle you want trough it. Clamp the guide to the ladle. Drill the ladle. More help? Send it to me with directions and thoughts and I'll mill it for you.
     
  7. CLP

    CLP Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,367
    Location:
    Alabama
    Before you sand, Dremel, or otherwise grind anything down, first make sure you're letting the ladle sit in lead a while to get really hot. That may be all the difference that's needed.

    You mention it needs to pour "quicker"- your ladle isn't aluminum, it's cast iron and could be acting as a heat sink, causing your alloy to cool down too much and affect the flow.
     
  8. the Black Spot

    the Black Spot Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,118
    Location:
    central arkansas
    Thanks for all the replies
     
  9. gwpercle

    gwpercle Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Messages:
    325
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    I use a small round "rat-tail" file and various grits of wet-or dry paper. Then used various files and tools to scrape out the insides....mine is 40 years old and had gotten ratehr cruddy in there. Smooth off the tip that presses against the mould sprue hole also.
    Letting it sit in the melt while heating and keeping it in the melt while you open the mould helps a lot in keeping it free flowing. If you take it out for any reason, submerge it in the melt and let it come back to full heat. Otherwise the lead will freeze and plug the spout when you try to fill a mould. And make sure to use enough heat to keep the alloy flowing from ladle into mould without hardening before proper fill out.
    Gary
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice