Quantcast

Cock on close to cock on open conversion

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Lash3006, Mar 15, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Lash3006

    Lash3006 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2017
    Messages:
    45
    Hi everyone, I have a 1935 Turkish mauser and when I ordered it online I didn’t realize some Gewehr 98s were cock on close. I know a couple places where I can get it converted but what would be an average price for something like this getting done? I’m sure there’s another thread about this somewhere but I couldn’t find one, thanks!
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  2. JeffG

    JeffG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    1,726
    Location:
    NE Wisconsin
    Why would you want to? Old school, I know, but you can pull the trigger, and keep it back as you close the bolt, it will bypass the cocking function on an open bolt and ease the bolt down on a chambered round and not fire the round, When the game appears, lift and drop the bolt and shoot the animal. I have an Enfield 1914 that works that way.
     
    boom boom and LoonWulf like this.
  3. Jim K

    Jim K Member.

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,848
    I don't know of any Mauser 98 that is cock on closing. But the Turks worked over and "updated" so many rifles that the original rifle could be almost anything. Cock on closing rifles can be converted to cock on opening, but require a stiff mainspring because they really fire from a "half cock" position with only a short firing pin movement.

    Jim
     
  4. boom boom
    • Contributing Member

    boom boom Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,777
    Location:
    GA
    I suspect what you have is an older 93 Mauser receiver that was refurbished by the Turks in 1935 as these were cock on closing. I do not know whether the intermediate 1903 type is cock on closing or opening. The 1938 is a large ring Mauser using a small ring barrel and a receiver flange covering the junction. From what I remember, the last one is all Mauser 98 on bolt, bolt sleeve, firing pin, cocking piece, and spring. Changing the cocking piece and spring back to standard should get you back to cock on opening. The 93 type can be converted but in reverse to the M98. If it is a 93 Type Receiver then this should do it if not other parts were altered. https://www.brownells.com/rifle-par...ll-ring-mauser-cock-on-open-kit-prod5690.aspx Price is about 40 bucks.
    Do read the comments though as it can require some fitting to the bolt sleeve.

    Do know conversions can make it harder to break down the bolt on the small ring Mausers and P14/1917 rifles. I removed a Dayton Traister kit from a 1917 Enfield (cocks on closing like small ring Mausers) and it was a real pain to disassemble the bolt as the spring was so tough to compress.

    Here is an old THR thread about cock on opening versus closing.
    https://www.thehighroad.org/index.p...re-cock-on-closing-vs-cock-on-opening.560522/
     
    JeffG likes this.
  5. Jim K

    Jim K Member.

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,848
    Boom Boom, your mainspring is not the original. The extra stiff mainspring came with the D-T trigger because, as I noted above, the rifle would not be reliable firing off the half cock position with the standard mainspring. To return the rifle to original specs (assuming nothing else has been done to it) you will need a standard mainspring.

    Jim
     
    boom boom and Lash3006 like this.
  6. Lash3006

    Lash3006 Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2017
    Messages:
    45
    I think I have a 1903 type model. As you can see in the pictures I have the raised stripper clip “ramp” or whatever it’s called, my hand guard is also short for my rifle which from what I’ve researched, the 1903 mausers receiver is shorter.
     

    Attached Files:

    JeffG likes this.
  7. boom boom
    • Contributing Member

    boom boom Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,777
    Location:
    GA
    Thanks Jim. I knew it was altered when I bought the 1917 action with the Dayton Traister conversion. I am sorry that I wasn't clear in answering the original post. What I did not know was how darn tough it was to break down the bolt to replace the DT spring and DT cocking piece with the original. I shed some blood trying to get it apart using the nickel trick. It was years ago but I still remember finally getting the darn thing apart.

    Afterwards, I made a simple bolt disassembly tool from a scrap piece of metal.

    I was trying to caution the OP about unintended consequences if you change the 1917 or p14 to cock on opening or older Mausers. It makes the bolt hard to disassemble for cleaning and those bolts are somewhat more difficult to disassemble anyway.
     
    JeffG likes this.
  8. Mr. Standfast

    Mr. Standfast Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2015
    Messages:
    45
    The only tool necessary to dismantle the P14 Enfield bolt is a loop of string, which you hook onto the cocking-piece. Raise it, and you can hold it slightly back and unscrew.

    I didn't have anything against cock-on-closing, which if anything cushions the wrist against jarring, but I wanted the Dayton-Traister speelock, which just happens to end up cock-on-opening, and their single-stage trigger. Even with the stronger spring supplied, it needs to lift the cocking-piece quite a bit more than to the notch on the rear of the bolt which prevents a slamfire on the unaltered version, if something interferes with sear engagement. So you have to deepen the camming notch in the bolt (Dremel tool with carbide burr), and fit the new cocking-piece with a longer forward extension which engages with it.

    A complication I found was that the safety (one of the best on any firearm, and far too good to replace with a trigger safety) would no longer engage in the little hook-shaped notch in the new cocking-piece. So I removed a tiny amount of metal from the lip of that notch, with the Dremel and a fine dental burr. I ended up engaging or disengaging in complete silence, which it didn't before, and still lifting the cocking-piece the very slight amount that is essential for safety.

    If the safety doesn't lift the cocking-piece, and you pull the trigger while the rifle is on safe, there may not be room for the sear to rise back into place when it is released. The rifle becomes an accident ready to happen when the safety is disengaged. Of course we would never point the rifle in an unsafe direction as we did that... would we? But two steps away from disaster are better than one.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice