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couple misc. cast/ .44 mag questions..

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by thomis, Jan 18, 2016.

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  1. thomis

    thomis Member

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    I'm loading this 275 grain cast:

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    It says COL should be 1.70". Well, when seated at that length, I can't get a good roll crimp because its not on the cannelure. Why would they give that COL then?

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    So, I seated four where it crimped on the cannelure and shot them at just above the minimum charge (2400). Very accurate, no pressure signs. So I'm working my way up on the charge looking for pressure signs. I just don't know why they have that long of a COL?

    Another question..I have some older Federal brass that has this ring close to the case mouth. It looked fine until I ran the expander die through a few and it looks as though the top part of the case mouth is could almost split at that ring and come off, what a calamity that would be. Any comments on the brass? I'm afraid that gas check may catch it on exit.

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  2. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    Seat your bullets to the cannelure and crimp, no need to even measure them (for revolvers) unless you have the exact bullet and your brass is trimmed to the trim length you will never match the COL given.

    Other question. The brass has a brass cannelure to keep the bullet from moving. Ignore it, After a few reloads it will be almost gone.
     
  3. thomis

    thomis Member

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    Rule3, thank you. I guess my concern comes from being careful not to seat a bullet too deep and increase the pressure inside. Like the danger of "bullet set back" when you load and unload a round several times in a semi-auto. If the bullet sets deeper and deeper the pressure is increased to dangerous levels. I must have read that somewhere.

    This brass has been loaded many times! I've been loading this .44 brass since I was in boy scouts ;)
     
  4. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    Rule 3 is correct on both counts.
    You're not using the EXACT SAME bullet in the data.
    So just seat it to the seating groove.

    And the cannelure in the brass will become almost non-existent as you fire it.
     
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