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Do I Need to Resize This Brass Again?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by slowr1der, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    So my normal process for reloading handgun ammo is to run the dirty brass through an universal decapping die, throw it in my wet tumbler to clean it, and then resize and expand it.

    Well, I was about out of ammo and extremely short on time so I decided to take a shortcut yesterday. The brass had some dirt on it since I'd picked most of it up off of the ground at the range. Well, I just decided to Resize and expand it while it was still dirty. Then I tossed it in the wet tumbler. I having second thoughts as I wait for it to dry and I'm wondering if the dirt on it while resizing it is going to have made it out of spec? Should I go back and resize and expand all of this brass again, or should I just load it up and not worry about it?
     
  2. WrongHanded

    WrongHanded Member

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    The answer may well depend on the cartridge, firearm, and level of accuracy you're after. Perhaps you should mention those.
     
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  3. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    It's 380ACP. I don't need precision accuracy, but I don't want to risk damage to the gun, or have feeding issues.
     
  4. WrongHanded

    WrongHanded Member

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    I can't offer any advice on anything but straight wall for revolvers, and that would only be newbie advice anyway. But I'm sure someone can advise further now.
     
  5. kcofohio
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    kcofohio Member

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    If you have good (normal) tension when seating the bullet. And when you crimp to get rid of the bell mouth. I believe it should be good to go.
     
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  6. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Sizing is sizing. All the dirt would do is produce scratches, or other cosmetic blemishes. If you use steel dies, dirt in the brass can also scratch the surface of the dies, but I'm going to assume you used a carbide die, so no damage would have resulted. The only thing that damages carbide dies is diamonds.

    Just load and shoot.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  7. Kaldor

    Kaldor Member

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    I dont think it will be an issue. If you are running in a progressive, then you would run the sizer and expander in stations 1 and 2. However, if you are running in a single, then you could decap and size, then tumble as you did, and I dont think you will see any issues.
     
  8. VThillman

    VThillman Member

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    Well jeez, at least clean the dies now. Cleanliness is next to Godliness, ain't it?
     
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  9. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Next time just wipe the cases down before you size them (I did that for 12 years before I got a tumbler). But I don't understand why when the brass is tumbled would affect the time? Size before or size after cleaning, which is faster?
     
  10. Load Master

    Load Master Member

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    You should be fine. Especially if you are using carbide dies. I resized brass for many years before having anything but a jar with water some dish soap and an old towel to dry it on. That was for the dirty stuff and the not so dirty when right into the sizing die.
     
  11. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    That's what I'll likely do. It saves time not tumbling first because I like to have clean primers pockets. So by skipping running several hundred cases through the decapping die, and then again through the resizing die after tumbling, just resizing and decapping in one step and then tumbling saves a lot of time.
     
  12. MEHavey

    MEHavey Member

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    ^^^^ THIS ^^^^
    Load it/Shoot it.
    :thumbup:
     
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  13. JO JO

    JO JO Member

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    words that don't fit in well with reloading, if anything you could scratch your dies then scratch your cases going forward
     
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  14. hdwhit
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    hdwhit Member

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    Unless you are one of those competitive shooters that fires five rounds at a thousand yards and ends up with only one4 hole in the target, no, the dirt will have no impact on your brass other than some cosmetic scratches. Whether the dirt had an impact on your dies is another matter, but you're probably okay there as well.
     
  15. thomas15

    thomas15 Member

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    Sounds to me like you need more 380 brass in your collection so that you can always have enough clean and ready to go to replace what you just shot at the range. If I were handloading 380 I would have a couple thousand pcs of brass and a couple 100 of those always ready for action.
     
  16. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    I agree! I only have a couple of hundred pieces. The prices I see people asking for 380 brass usually seem crazy, so I've just stuck with what I have and what I can pickup at the range.
     
  17. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    Why not tumble first and then deprime and size in one step?
     
  18. slowr1der

    slowr1der Member

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    If I do this, it doesn't clean the primer pockets when tumbling.
     
  19. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Cleaning primer pockets is waaay overrated. Unless you're shooting benchrest loads, cleaning your primer pockets, especially for handgun ammo is not necessary. But, if you want to,cool. No Reloading Police are gonna kick down your door and confiscate your ammo 'cause you did it "wrong".
     
  20. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    That. Does. Not. Matter.

    At. All.
     
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  21. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...dirt on it while resizing it is going to..." Nope. Might, and it's a big might, have scratched your dies though.
     
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  22. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    Clean pockets are important to me only because after three or four cycles it gets difficult to seat the primer all the way down. I end up squashing a divot in them with the priming tool. This I dislike. So wet tumbling is great for that.
    Betwixt the proper and squashed I detect no difference, save for the frustration while loading.
    Do your dies a favor and clean them first, your hands will thank you as well.
     
  23. earplug

    earplug Member

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    Many of us older reloaders never owned a tumbler until recently.
    Carbine dies make life easy.
     
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  24. bds
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    bds Member

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  25. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

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    Well yeah, clean primer pockets are important to me for the same reason. But I was cleaning primer pockets with a hand primer pocket cleaner for 20 years before I ever owned a tumbler. And before that I was cleaning them with a little screwdriver. Even now that I have a tumbler, if all I was worried about was the chunks of charcoal left behind in primer pockets, I can easily clean a hundred primer pockets in ten minutes with a RCBS or Hornady hand tool. That's a lot faster than I can clean them in my tumbler, and my hand tools don't use any electricity.:)
     
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