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do video games have any real life benefit

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Mrcymstr, Mar 2, 2012.

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  1. Mrcymstr

    Mrcymstr Member

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    OK I'm gonna go ahead and put on my flame retardant suit. I was wondering if any of the fine people that also frequent this site thought there may be any real life benefits from playing different shooting based games. Don't get me wrong there is No substitute for training, trigger time, and being "t3h 1337" at the latest and greatest Call of Duty does not make you a SEAL but it's an interesting thought.

    My personal opinion is (depending on the individual game in question) could make one rethink strategy, risk vs. Reward, and when it's appropriate to do a tactical reload. I liken it to something I've heard of in the martial arts I believe was called "image training ". The idea being if you imagine a situation it will enhance your response in the real world. JUST curious for your opinions
     
  2. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    I grew up with them and I was able to fully understand my interest in guns. It can have some good effects and some bad effects. The 12 year old "experts" on Youtube are bad but seem to get better as they learn more.

    There are some good examples, and there are some absolutely horrible and dangerous examples like this half-wit:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LapoR0q98-w

    That *ahem* not so smart person is trying to replicate something that is done in the popular video game, Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3 with a real firearm. That is spinning around with a rifle and then stopping to discharge a round without aiming.

    That kid should not own guns till he learns to keep his video games and firearms separate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  3. Orkan

    Orkan Member

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    High end competitive gamers have extremely fast response times. Usually on the order of 5 times faster than a normal person.
     
  4. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    First time I went through an informal match at the local club, I placed first and held that the entire day and I was just 17 at the time using someone Else's gun that the last time I shot it was exactly a year before at the same event.
     
  5. tarosean

    tarosean Member

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    NO... Video games are repetitive in nature. offering nothing "new" after playing a though a time or two. Plus the lack of recoil... course no one would want to play the games if they introduced realistic recoil.....
    Just so you dont automatically think Im some "old stick in the mud". Ive owned every COD game produced and Im in my 40's.
     
  6. Orkan

    Orkan Member

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    You may own COD games... but you clearly don't understand how repetitive action affects the mind.

    If video games have no bearing on honing skills of all kinds, please explain the military's continued development of high end multi-million dollar simulators and unmanned drone technology?
     
  7. DeadLiver

    DeadLiver Member

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    I think that there is some correlation. I play Battlefield 3 online with some friends (I'm almost the youngest player at 29) and I can see where understanding of some concepts can cross over to the real world. I'll try and list them as I put on my flame-retardant suit.

    1. Leading targets: While video game physics of course don't parallel with the real world, video games do provide excellent opportunities to practice leading a moving target.

    2. "Shoot and scoot"/cover and concealment: Especially for somebody like me whose medical history has prevented careers in the military and law enforcement fields, standing still to shoot like on a range is a habit that has to be broken on the virtual battlefield or else you get turned to swiss cheese almost every time you take a shot. In more recent games, bullets can penetrate fences, walls and the like, emphasizing the difference between concealment and true cover.

    3. Clearing corners: I'm constantly given embarrassing (rather than fatal) reminders to clear corners, hallways, alleyways, and rooms as I rush haphazardly around a map.

    4. Communication: We play cooperatively, usually in 2 to 4 man squads. In order to operate effectively, communication is key. Spotting target, relaying routes, dividing sectors/responsibilities, it's all helpful.

    Naturally, there's no way that hours spent playing Battlefield or Call of Duty will ever replace real trigger time or actual training. I can see however that depending on the game, and how you play it potential for reinforcing lessons for staying alive on a real battlefield. To actually get good training, I'll be attending courses at the Counter-terrorism Institute of America, located in UT. www.combat-terror.com
     
  8. Positivity

    Positivity Member

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    Realistic video games may offer tactics and reaction time training, but not real experience.
     
  9. Orkan

    Orkan Member

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    I agree to a point. There are other benefits beyond tactics and reaction time as well. Simulators/video games can be used to generate automated instinctual behavior in a much more controlled and less costly environment. The real measure of benefits to be cleaned, is determined by the scope of the game/simulator itself and how "real" it can be made to be.

    Yet one can very easily see the benefit of such a system and could also call it "experience" if you ran hundreds of different scenario's on a high end simulator/game such as those offered by lasershot. Just about any scenario you can dream up, can be created and run. If that isn't a form of "experience" I'm not sure what is.
     
  10. tarosean

    tarosean Member

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    vs. 60.00 buck off the shelve technology?
     
  11. Orkan

    Orkan Member

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    I fail to understand your question. Would you have me believe that all video games and all simulators at every price offer the same experience and benefits?
     
  12. PzGren

    PzGren Member

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    That's a good point. I have used the shooting simulators (EST 2000) in the military and they are a lot of fun and also a fairly good training aid.

    It is still cheaper to "fire" one thousand rounds at the computer simulation than a thousand rounds of real ammo, it is also easier to practice different scenarios and all can be done from the comfort of a classroom, keeping travel times and expenses down in the long run.

    But alone it does not substitute real shooting and does not build the physical skills and weapon handling skills to prevail in a military firefight.
     
  13. Orkan

    Orkan Member

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    Actually it does. It's just that you haven't been exposed to a simulator that replicates all of those things.

    I have... and I can tell you they are AMAZING to the degree that they can realistically replicate nearly everything you would encounter in real life situations. Everything from weather, recoil, wind, weapon functionality, etc etc. You name it, they can simulate it on an indoor range with pneumatics, or live fire.
     
  14. PzGren

    PzGren Member

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    I have used the ones that simulate recoil, bullet drop, etc. The exact name is AGSHP, the German version of the EST 2000 used by the U.S. armed forces. I have also operated the controls to cause the malfunctions for the shooters. I had fiendish fun doing so.

    What have you used that it is so different?
     
  15. Inebriated

    Inebriated Member

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    They certainly can help someone in understanding tactics.
     
  16. Tim the student

    Tim the student Member

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    Yeah, there are real life benefits. They reduce my stress, maintain/improve good hand eye coordination and dexterity, may help with PTSD, may help with spatial relationships, get people interested in guns etc etc.

    They also have the potential to have negative effects too, for that matter (sometimes grossly inaccurate info, "ammo" for antis, teaching the "X" button reloads etc)

    Yes, and the can also teach horrendous tactics.
     
  17. pikid89

    pikid89 Member

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    The best use I found from COD was when I was teaching my little cousin to shoot my 10/22 with Tech Sights... I was having trouble explaining the sight picture when I remembered that he plays Call of Duty...So i reminded him of the m16 sight picture and with in minutes he was making solid hits with the .22
     
  18. Voltia

    Voltia member

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    They're GAMES. They're not supposed to have "real life benefit." It's a pleasurable time waster, nothing more, nothing less. I think the OP looks to be some staunch conservative Christian and is trying to damn by faint praise.

    I was a league level counterstrike player ten years ago. It had nothing to do with my rifle aim, which has been consistently decent since I learned to shoot 25 years ago. Other than being able to say "Damn, even _I_ can shoot an AK better than that!" while in game, they really don't carry over to each other.

    Video games are games, combat sims are simulations. They are not the same thing. Plus, there are more video games than just FPS games. The biggest game in the world right now has you play a fantasy character that casts spells and other sundry things, which has nothing to do with real life skills unless I suddenly learn to call hellfire down from the sky.
     
  19. LJ-MosinFreak-Buck

    LJ-MosinFreak-Buck Member

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    There is a fine line between video-games teaching tactics and being a helpful training aide, and some horrid, bad-habit inducing nightmare.

    A lot of gamers who play, use an erratic style of play, often called "Run and Gun" where the terms "Quick-Scope" and "No-Scope" were coined. Like the video posted earlier of the next Darwin Award Winner, the players will run around the map, pulling up their scope and shooting fast, or not aiming all. Both of these are colloloquially (spelling?) called "Spray and Pray" when used with a full-auto firearm in-game.

    This style of gameplay originated somewhere around the time of Couter Strike, another popular game, and Call of Duty. When the Battlefield series came out, it was intended for "more serious" gameplay. Meaning, the Battlefield games were meant to have your team working together to achieve your mission objective. There would be a number of squads per team, consisting of 2-4 players each squad. Each player in a squad would fill a certain role, such as Assault, Engineer, Support, and Recon.

    The Assault class consists of a rifle, typically MBR type rifles like the M16, AK's, G3, etc. this class (though changed, then restored in BF3) was assigned Medic duty, reviving and providing first aid to your downed or hurt squadmates or teammates.

    The Engineer class is usually equipped with a carbine type rifle such as the M4, AKS-74u, G36C, etc. The primary role for the Engineer class is "Vehicle Management" as I like to call it. This class is also equipped with a vehicle repair device, along with a vehicle destruction device. As you can tell, this glass is mainly used for taking out vehicles.

    The Support Class is usually equipped with an LMG type weapon, such as the M249, the M240B, or PKP Pecheneg, etc. The role this class plays is putting the opposing team under suppression (an effect of gameplay that has a debilitating effect on your player) and providing ammunition for your squad or team.

    The Recon class is mainly equipped with marksman rifles, such as the SVD, M40A5, SV-98, etc. The primary role of this class is spotting enemies, them being equipped with aerial surveillance devices and motion sensors to assist your team by allowing them to know where the enemy is at. They are able to pick an enemy off at greater distance accurately.

    The negatives that Call of Duty has brought over to this type of gameplay (Battlefield) is the "Run and Gunning." this method of gameplay just ruins the game, in it's entertainment level and meaning. If it weren't for these lousy tactics of "Run and Gun," the possibility of Battlefield as a good training aid gets higher. It does help with your reaction time and tactics if you play the game it is meant to be played.

    You know you are on a good team when your teammates are storming separate objectives at once, but in a coordinated manner. You are also in an effective squad if the squad has one of each class, or two members running Assault and the other two running Engineer and Support.

    The Battlefield 3 game is more about your team accumulating a collective score or destroyed object, and your team can really only win with cooperation. Playing by yourself and not working for your team won't help you win at all.

    In Call of Duty, there is none of this. You basically just run around and kill the opposing players, using whatever firearm you choose (some of which are poorly represented). This offers nothing. Each player is typically only concerned with his K/D (Kill/Death) ratio. Some of this has followed over to Battlefield 3, which is unfortunate, because it only detracts from the game.

    Sorry for my rant on gameplay, the point I'm trying to get across is that certain games, like Battlefield 3, for instance if given a good team, can teach you a lot. Yes, it isn't a substitute for actual trigger time, but gaming can be useful for something.
     
  20. CSestp

    CSestp Member

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    Yes they can help in many ways. Can they teach you proper form, sight picture, and safety. Hell no. My step son who like all kids plays these games. Started taking him to the range. With iron sights he can't hit anything. First time with a scope he was nailing targets at 300. I think this was because he understood bullet drop from Battlefield 3, and you could see him moving his head all over the place until the scope looked like it does in the game, or until he had proper eye relief.

    The marines use a nodded version of an off the shelf game to simulate how to move in squads. This seems like a very redundant question. Almost like is learning to drive on the highway will help you win a NASCAR race. No not really but your going to be better off than the guy that has never driven a car at all.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk
     
  21. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Member

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    Better visual acuity
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/03/090329-video-game-vision.html

    "Previous research shows that gaming improves other visual skills, such as the ability to track several objects at the same time and paying attention to a series of fast-moving events"

    More effective treatment for Lazy eye than Eye-patching.
    http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001135

    " We quantified the limits and the time course of visual plasticity induced by video-game experience. The recovery in visual acuity that we observed is at least 5-fold faster than would be expected from occlusion therapy in childhood amblyopia"

    Better Surgical skills, (among other things). Improvements in suturing and laproscopic skills.
    http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/gpr-14-2-113.pdf

    "Studies with physicians that have examined the relationship of
    video game play to actual surgical skills such as targeting and
    grasping objects and suturing have also shown a great deal of
    evidence of a positive association. One study that compared the
    surgical skills of avid video game players (3 hr/week) with their
    less avid counterparts found that the avid players made 37% fewer
    errors and were 27% faster in completing a simulated laparoscopic
    procedure and suturing"

    Would you rather your Surgeon Golf all weekend? :)
     
  22. PzGren

    PzGren Member

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    Well,

    I don't think someone that is already a surgeon will play a lot of games. While studying in pre-med or med school, there is actually little time for games, it is hard studies. I have two kids in either pre-med or med school, they do not have a lot of time for hobbies.

    I prefer a doctor that knows what he is doing and gets the proper diagnosis to an artist with "needle and thread".
     
  23. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    the main benefit I see is that video games have given us another generation with at least an interest in guns.I had thought that ours might be the last.
     
  24. baronthered

    baronthered Member

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    Technically you could call hellfire from the sky.

    It's called close air support. :D :neener:

    " I love the smell of napalm in the morning" :evil:

    I'll be here all week. :D

    Sorry sorry Too many long nights at work and I am very glad the weekend is here.
     
  25. NoirFan

    NoirFan Member

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    I agree. I grew up in a no-gun environment so Goldeneye 007 on the Super Nintendo was the starting point for my interest. From there it took about 10 years for me to educate myself about the real thing but it wouldn't have happened without video games.
     
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