Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Electric Case Trimmer

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by CountGlockulla, Jan 6, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. CountGlockulla

    CountGlockulla Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    Texas
    I'm looking to start shooting some NRA Service Rifle and would like to speed up my prep time for cases. A quick google search came up with two trimmers I am interested in:

    Gracey or Giruad.

    I'm soliciting experiences with these trimmers with a particular emphasis on models purchased in the last 6 months or so. If the Giruad is worth the money I will gladly pay the extra amount.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  2. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    913
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio USA
    I have a Giraud for my Service Rifle cases; just finished 1k 7.62mm cases. The Giraud trimmed, deburred, and chamfered them in two hours. It took about 5-seconds per case from the time I reached for one to the time I threw it in the 'completed' box. The trimmer is perfectly safe to operate and is fairly quiet.

    The only recommendation if you get one is to wear a glove, as my fingers got tender after awhile when I wasn't wearing one. The trimmer has a lot of torque.

    I just ordered the parts needed to do 1k .30 Carbine. It only took a 5-minute phone call. Whoopee!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. WNTFW

    WNTFW Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,906
    All things I hear are the Giraud is better.

    I have not used a Gracey. I have used a Giraud. It was loaned by a fellow service rifle shooter. We trimmed over 8,000 .223 in one week. I say we because my wife helped me. I brass was sized so we just trimmed in that time frame. We also canned a bunch of vegetable at the same time. The trimming was in the downtime of the canning. I was impressed we go it done during an ongoing large project. We each had a box of cases and put a 3rd box to put trimmed cases in. I would trim one while she picked hers up, then she would trim while I would get the next case ready. The blade was cutting almost all the time. We oriented the machine with the case opening up. Rubberized gloves helped get traction as your hands tire. I just wanted to get the guy his machine back asap. I delivered it back & bought him lunch.

    One thing I learned is it is easier to run a case through the Giraud than to gauge them for trimming. I had some groups of 400 case that didn't need trimming and it was easier to just run them than to measure them.

    Doug Giraud also supports the Hi Power community and I have witnessed it personally if that helps with your decision.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  4. CountGlockulla

    CountGlockulla Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    Texas
    That is very helpful gentlemen.

    Thank you for the info and pictures.
     
  5. IMtheNRA

    IMtheNRA Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,124
    I've had my Giraud for about 2 years now, and while it was very expensive, it is well worth the money I spent on it. I no longer dread processing all this .223 brass. Perfectly trimmed and chamfered in just a few seconds.
     
  6. IMtheNRA

    IMtheNRA Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,124
    I've had my Giraud for about 2 years now, and while it was very expensive, it is well worth the money I spent on it. I no longer dread processing all this .223 brass. Perfectly trimmed and chamfered in just a few seconds.
     
  7. Waldog

    Waldog Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    241
    Love, love, LOVE, my Giraud Trimmer. I wonder why I didn't buy it sooner. I trim my cases every time they are reloaded. It's quite surprising how some calibers will stretch after being fired ONCE.:D
     
  8. Win1892

    Win1892 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    318
    Location:
    NW Florida
    +1 for Giraud. I'm a tool guy and this the Hemi of reloading tools.
     
  9. capreppy

    capreppy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2011
    Messages:
    619
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX (Saginaw)
    +1 for someone that loves the Giraud. My buddy and I have cutter / case holders for 223, 308 and have on order ones for 260 and 300BLK
     
  10. Foton

    Foton Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    23
    Giraud. Have had one for about 4 years and it really takes the hassle out of prep.
     
  11. dmazur

    dmazur Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    2,263
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    I have no experience with the Gracey, but the Giraud is a very nice tool.

    If you reload more than one caliber (in large quantities), the Giraud has "quick change" bushings and cutters available, so you don't have to buy a separate machine for each caliber.
     
  12. oldfortyfiveauto

    oldfortyfiveauto Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Messages:
    284
    Another plus for Doug's trimmer. I also suggest that you consider getting his annealing machine when you can afford it.
     
  13. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    Messages:
    7,538
    Location:
    Alabama
    As a competitive highpower shooter I shoot lots of .223, and 308 in highpower competition. Used to shoot a lot of 30-06, but not as much now. It used to take weeks to trim a seasons brass with a Lee or a Redding lathe trimmer. I am able to trim 88 cases in five minutes including set up and put away with my Giraud trimmer, this is a vast improvement over anything I did previous.


    I have three powered trimmers that will trim, deburr, and bevel the case mouth in one operation: The RCBS case trimmer, the Gracey, and now the Giraud trimmer. The speed champ, until I received the Giraud trimmer, was of course the Gracey.

    I purchased a Gracey direct from Col Gracey when he sold trimmers at Camp Perry. He was a interesting and enthusiastic salesman. I still have mine.

    Having now trimmed a thousands of cases in each of these trimmers, I feel that I can make a fair comparison/assessment of the Giraud trimmer.

    The Giraud trimmer is quieter than my Gracey trimmer, but I do not know if it is intrinsic to the design, or whether I just have a loud Gracey and a quiet Giraud. This means I can trim and listen to either the radio or TV without the rest of the neighborhood having to "enjoy" the same programs.

    It is faster than the Gracey, where the cutter spins at the same speed as the motor. The Giraud spins its cutter through a notched belt and toothed gear system, the gear ratio adjusted so the Giraud cutter rotates faster than the motor.

    Mr. Giraud supplies the cutter with a carbide blade of his own design. I really do not know anyone who has good luck with the Gracey "tool steel" (probably high carbon steel) blades except Mr. Gracey. I have unsuccessfully gone through two sets of Gracey blades, trying to find a set that will take and hold an edge. The two blades of the Gracey trimmer are difficult to adjust in tandem, the once piece Bob Jones and Giraud blades are faster to adjust.

    A side comment, I also have the Bob Jones carbide cutter blade. The Giraud Blade provides an internal case mouth chamfer of 15 degrees and an external case mouth of 45 degrees (per Doug Giraud). The Bob Jones does not cut as steep an internal slope as does the Giraud, and I find that I prefer the steeper slope. The reason is that it creates less resistance when seating a bullet. This is an advantage to me, because I dump powder and seat the bullet on a Dillion 550B. Every so often a bullet will tip and jam into the bottom edge of my seating die. If I can detect this in time I can stop and can clear the condition before the case gets ruined. However, when the bullet requires significant effort to seat, it is hard to differentiate on the seating stroke between a jammed bullet and normal seating. The end result is usually a crumpled case neck.

    I like having an "On-Off" Switch. The Girard comes with an On-Off switch. My Gracey trimmer did not come with one. I went to home depot, bought a cheap switch, cut the wires, drilled the Gracey base, and now I can turn the thing off without pulling the cord from the wall socket.

    The most important thing I found that made the Giraud a speed champ was that you can cut in a horizontal position, like the Gracey, or a vertical (upright) position. With the Giraud in a vertical position, I can put the machine upright in front of me, and trim cases with both hands. In the horizontal position I can feed cases to one hand, but only one hand can hold the case in the trimmer. This little difference significantly reduces hand fatigue and increases the effective trim rate. And one other thing, with the machine pointing up, the brass chips fall down out of the shell holder. These machines headspace on the case shoulder, so with the Gracey in a horizontal position, I am constantly checking trim length, and wiping out the inside of the shell holder because inevitably, a brass chip will fall into the shell holder and change the trim length.

    My Giraud trimmer has a quick shell holder change feature. I can change out the shell holder from from 30-06 to 308 without having to readjust for depth. The Gracey shell holder must be readjusted for depth when changing calibers. Mr. Giraud has made an improvement to his trimmer, after I purchased mine, but it allows quick change of the cutter head. Currently I can only trim cartridges of the same caliber without adjusting the cutter head. This adjustment is perhaps the most time consuming as I try to get an chamfer angle I like and still deburr the outside of the brass. This is also true of the Gracey. However Mr. Giraud has made a removable cutter head which is a better idea and would allow a very quick change over from .223 to .308 for example. The removable cutter head option is a great idea, but it is not cheap.

    Gracey's tool was good in its day, but the Giraud is an improvement.
     
  14. IROCZ

    IROCZ Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Messages:
    237
    Location:
    PA
    I still ise a Gracey. I have for about 10 years. I am happy with it. I have never even seen a Giraud, maybe thats for the best...
     
  15. lightman

    lightman Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    634
    Location:
    england,ar
    Another happy Giraud customer here!I can average trimming 14-15 a minute.It will also hold the length to within 1/1000th or so.My method is to set the trimmer up with a pile of brass on the left and an empty box or tray on the right.I pick a case up with my left hand and pass it to my right hand to trim while the left picks up another.Sound complicated but with a little practice,it is fast and smooth.Oh,there is an occasional case that is longer than the rest,or you fumble one and it breaks your cycle,but its fast.The machine is well designed and made,and is quiet.You can save a little time when changing calibers by buying another complete cutter assembly.A favorite mod to this is to add a die lock ring to hold your adjustment. Hope this helps, Lightman
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page