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Feral hog meat?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by velocette, Jun 19, 2013.

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  1. velocette

    velocette Member

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    OK, let me be right up front. I haven't hunted since 1968 when I got back from Vietnam. I've been shooting competitively and for enjoyment ever since though and am considered at least a decent shot.
    Alright. I now work as a part time range officer at a large public range.
    Some of the folks there have invited me to participate in a hog hunt in a few months. Sounds good to me, but I want to be able to use the meat from the hog for food. Some have said that the meat is tough or strong flavored or smelly ( ? )
    Hog hunters, what do YOU do with the meat of feral hogs that you shoot?
    Can you have bacon made? or pork chops etc? Obviously a younger or female hog is preferable.
    What say y'all?

    Roger
     
  2. ILikeLead

    ILikeLead Member

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    Sausage.
     
  3. dtalley

    dtalley Member

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    all of it. we've had summer sausage, porkchops, bacon, smoked hams, regular sausage, ribs and anything else that can be made with them. The younger ones are better but we have butchered 250 pounders before but most if it went into sausage.
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    You can do anything with it that you can do to a farm pig, though dehairing wojuld be a might tough. I just skin 'em, so pork skins are out for me. I take the hams for roasting in the crock pot or smoking on the smoker (my favorite way) and the backstraps/loins and just grind the rest for sausage. I have my own grinder and stuffer.
     
  5. mnhntr

    mnhntr Member

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    makes the best pulled pork sandwiches you've ever eaten.
     
  6. Sam. Colt

    Sam. Colt Member

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    To me, the meat of a boar is preferred. The sows, while generally more tender, seem mealy in texture.

    Small boars, up to 25 lbs, can be covered in rub, grilled for 30 min per side, then wrapped in foil and baked for 4-6 hours at 200 degrees until the meat shakes off the bone.

    Larger boars benefit from a bit of brining before roasting, and the hams can be soaked and then cured.
     
  7. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    When my brother kills a hog in the swamp it's time for a hog roast. Imagine a layer of wood in a hole, followed by hay followed by green grass, then the hog, then another layer of hay then after the wood is fired covered with dirt for several hours. The steam from the grass makes the pork so tender it falls off the bone.
     
  8. a-sheepdog

    a-sheepdog Member

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    When I hog hunt, I cut off the backstraps, pull the hams and the tenders. According to the size of the hog, I seldome take the shoulders. I generally cook it in a crock pot on low heat for a long period of time and it gets tender and is tasty. Main thing is clean the hog ASAP and get it on ice. Let it sit in ice for a few days to bleed out the meat and then just package it for the freezer or cook as desired. Main thing is low heat works best to break down the tissue. My wife and kids love it and its all natural, plus I enjoy the hunt.
     
  9. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    The first few ones I killed were tough and I started just giving them away to other hunters I encountered where I was hunting. All of the hogs I've killed have been on public land in Fla. so were not fed up with corn etc. I killed a fat young gilt finally and had her made into Italian sausage. It was fabulous. I'll only do that from now on.

    I did barbeque a ham once and it made good pulled pork except for being very dry due to little fat on that stringy hog.
     
  10. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Bubba Gump could go on and on.
     
  11. xxjumbojimboxx

    xxjumbojimboxx Member

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    This is the best reply I've ever seen on this site!

    "sausage"

    Says it all, Don't it :)?
     
  12. 41 Mag

    41 Mag Member

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    We put just about all of them we get in the freezer in one way, form, or fashion. The only time I don't is if it's hot, and I don't have time to deal with the skinning and dressing more than one out. The smaller they are the quicker things go, but sometimes you can have more than you can deal with depending on the temperature.

    We usually skin, and quarter them as fast as possible after they hit the ground. Most if not all of the gamey taste comes from one, having one jacked up on adrenalin or two not getting it in the cooler ASAP. IF you shoot one and it makes a run for it, depending on how load before it is actually taking a nap, can put a LOT of funky taste in the meat. The quicker they take a dirt nap the better. Once they are on the ground the quicker you have them out of the woods and cooling the better the meat will be.

    As for what we do with ours, we make ground from a lot of it since it can be used in so many different ways. The back straps and tender loins we make cutlets from, I also on the bigger ones will take a small pair of limb loppers, and snip the ribs out right along the backbone. Depending on the size we will either cut and wrap the shoulders and hams or bone them out for cutlets or ground. Most of the trimmings are tossed into a bag to go through the grinder as well.

    If you don't have a grinder, you might contact a local butcher shop, or someone who processes deer locally. You can quite possibly get them to grind for a small fee. We did have a place close that would do it for a flat rate of $10. He would take up to a 72qt cooler full for that. Sure was nice since we didn't have to do anything but trim it out and wrap it once we got it home.

    We have tried it just about every way you can cook it. Most of the time we do like mentioned above, grill it for a short period over some post oak to get some flavoring, wrap it in foil, then set the oven for around 225 - 250 and let it slow cook through the day. I mostly use a dry rub on it that permeates the meat and gives it some kick.

    With the cutlets, we pull out the bigger muscles from a ham or shoulder and cut them across the grain, and package. You want to be sure you look for and remove the small raisin sized glands as they can really mess up a meal. You will find them in between the muscles, and they look, well, like a swollen up raisin. If your cutting ham steaks, you just be sure to look for, and remove them as you go. We usually cut our steaks into about 1/2" or so thick slices as they seem to cook up a bit more tender that way. For grilling them we will go a bit thicker.

    When you get to cooking, just remember to cook slow using a low heat or it will dry out quick and be tough. Just make sure you get it up to over 200 or so for at least 10 or so minutes to kill off any micro critters. I think that 185'ish if recommended, but I know that 225'ish has worked for a long time for us.

    I have never tried to get bacon off any feral hogs, but I have wrapped plenty of it in bacon on skewers and grilled it. Throw a few veggies in along side it with possibly a half a good sized shrimp and your asking for a full belly.
     
  13. Paul7

    Paul7 Member

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    When cooked right, it is my favorite meat. 225 degrees for about 4-5 hours for a small ham. Bratwurst are good from them also.
     
  14. Toml

    Toml Member

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    It will be a good idea to read up on brucellosis and take precautions when handling wild hogs.
     
  15. nathan

    nathan Member

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    Sausage is practically the way to go for hogs bigger than 150 lbs. The meat is tougher so grind them and make them into sausages. The younger 100 lbers are more tender and best for anything just like ones from the store.
     
  16. ID-shooting

    ID-shooting Member

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    Mmmmmmmm bacon, drooool.

    I have always wanted to hunt wild pigs. We were getting a small population of feral pigs here but they either died off, got hunted out, or the new wolves got them.
     
  17. OilyPablo

    OilyPablo Member

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    You guys are lucky to live in hog country. There I said it.
     
  18. Barry the Bear

    Barry the Bear Member

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    Anybody feeling hungry now reading this stuff?
     
  19. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    How do they make salt pork? I've never had it.
    A many day cold smoke would be the way I'd try to go.
    Prosciutto Crudo style is very good, of course, but takes a year or two to make.
     
  20. 03Shadowbob

    03Shadowbob Member

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    A lot of wild hogs don't have much bacon on them at all to worry about unless they are really well fed.
    Straps and hams for me usually and then just toss the rest. Some times I will go for the tenders if I feel like gutting one.
    The key to down here is quick kill and on ice quickly.
     
  21. Eb1

    Eb1 Member

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    When you shoot them the first thing to do is take them to a power car wash and spray them as clean as you can get them.

    We bleed them out real good. Soak the meat in salt by leaving it in a cooler for 3 days while pouring salt and replacing ice as it melts. Be sure to drain the cooler when doing this method. Then do what you want with it.

    This is if it is a big pig. Other wise a baby.. Just clean it, gut it, cut it, wash it, and freeze it.

    Also the hams, fronts and straps are a good choice, and toss the rest. Sometimes it isn't worth gutting those nasty things.
     
  22. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    Yep, most wild hogs have little bacon. This big sow is an exception; she was feeding on acorns and pecans:

    [​IMG]




    IMO: A really skinny hog is not fit to eat.
     
  23. bison

    bison Member

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    For some phenomenal wild pig recipes go to http://honest-food.net

    Hank Shaw is a gourmet chef and outdoorsman who generously shares his recipes. Try the chilendron - it's awesome. I've also made the chile verde, chile colorado, and absolutely adore his venison chili. Try it, you'll like it.
     
  24. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    The first thing you need to realize is that any meat from a wild hog will NOT taste like pork from the store. It's not "gamey" tasting either. It simply taste like the pork our grandparents and great-grandparents used to eat as opposed to the hormone infused, pen raised crap sold in grocery stores. Moving on...

    In my experience smaller hogs, up to 150 lbs. or so, are best. The best I ever had was a gilt I shot a couple of years ago. I'd highly recommend you read up on "curing" pork with a mixture of Morton's Tender Quick, brown sugar and water. I cured the meat from the above mentioned hog then smoked it and it was the best pork I've ever eaten.

    35W
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  25. 03Shadowbob

    03Shadowbob Member

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