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Finished full flap Single Six holsters

Discussion in 'Handguns: Accessories, Holsters, and Optics' started by Tallbald, Jun 2, 2016.

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  1. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    When I injured my spine in 2011 and had two surgeries that helped but didn't cure my problems, I became disabled and was told to find different hobbies from what I had enjoyed the previous 53 years. I sort of fell into leather crafting as a way to help retain my fine and gross motor movements and it's an art I can practice carefully with my physical limitations.
    I'm always seeking helpful, constructive comments. These are unlined and crafted from 7-8 ounce American vegetable tanned Hermann Oak leather, are hand dip dyed and coated with Fiebing's acrylic finish. A final coat of hand rubbed Fiebing's Carnuba Wax adds a good feel to the touch, The rivets are solid copper and the double row stitching is strong nylon for durability. They fit up to a 1 5/8 inch wide belt.They snugly fit my own Ruger 5 1/2 inch Single Six.
    Full flap holsters sing to me and I love crafting them for both mine and others guns. For these I chose deep brown with brown stitching on one, and black with brown stitching for the other. I'm pleased with how they turned out.
    Input from others would be appreciated. Thanks for looking. Don Sterchi
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  2. Coop45

    Coop45 Member

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    Well done! I think you are on to something.
     
  3. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    Coop45 thank you for the kind words. I'm told I'll never be the active fellow I was before the spinal injury, and it took me a long time to come to terms with my limitations. I'm blessed with a wonderfully supportive family that always lets me know I am valued. Leather crafting isn't inexpensive to do, but selling much of what I craft helps subsidize the cost. It's also a wonderful way to keep my fine and gross motor skills up. DonSterchi
     
  4. 444

    444 Member

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    Looks good to me.

    I recently, received a full flap holster I ordered fro El Paso Saddlery for a model 34 S&W.

    I am a big fan of full flap holsters for field guns and I own s few of them. FWIW: I am not a fan of the generic/one size fits all holster. I want a holster made for my specific gun. I once paid a guy to make me a full flap holster for a 4.5" Single Six. He made it for a six inch barrel despite the fact that, that isnt what I wanted and proudly told me he made it that way so I could use it with various guns. I never used the holster. I was tempted to throw it away. Why should the holster be bigger and bulkier than it needs to be ? People that do stuff like this have never actually carried a gun.
     
  5. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    444 I agree with you. I've been asked to make holsters for guns I do not have access to, but I always politely decline and explain that there are subtle differences in each gun style. There's no really good way in my book to "wing" making a holster, and I would like to buy accurate mock-up guns to use for my pattering on guns folks want my holsters for. Even though the ones shown are only $100 holsters, they should fit right, be made well and be attractive. Thanks for commenting. Don Sterchi
     
  6. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Very nice work!!

    What are you sewing with??

    I made a full flap for my S&W Kit Gun this winter.
    Another for a Colt Woodsman a few years ago.

    Full pig skin lined do for easy on the finish.

    I like'm!!

    Woodsman = Note sight protector tab.
    It seals the flap dust and mostly waterproof too!
    Woodsman Holster 33.jpg

    Kit gun = Drying after forming.
    Holster 6.jpg



    rc
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  7. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    RCModel those are beautiful. I had to stop hand stitching because of the time sitting and arthritis in my hands. Two years ago I purchased, with the encouragement of my wife and children a Cowboy 3500 (Juki clone) saddle sewing machine. Named her Bertha Jo. She's 300 pounds of cast iron and steel beauty, and has allowed me to continue doing what I love. next order I place for a hide, I'll be buying some 3-4 ounce cowhide with which to line some of my holsters. The pigskin I tried (2-3 ounce) didn't suit my applications as well as I had hoped.
    Love seeing others work, and yours is wonderful! Don Sterchi
    Here's a picture of Bertha Jo in my loving wife Penny's and my hobby room:
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  8. 444

    444 Member

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    Tallbald

    Now that I am looking at those holsters on a PC (before was using my phone) they look fantastic. Very nice work.

    I am also glad you understood the point of my previous comment. It was just a comment about holster making in general and not about your work. I have bought a few good holsters and after the first one or two, I realized what separated the good from the bad and what I wanted in a custom holster; which basically is a custom holster and not some generic thing.
     
  9. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    444 I sure do understand. For years I made do with the generic holster approach. The beauty of crafting holsters and custom belts is that I can tailor what I make to exactly what I or others need. Here's a set I made myself with a laminated belt and custom holster for my 3 inch Ruger SP101 (and a well worn cell phone case). There was nothing like it I could find on the market when I designed and crafted it. . Truly custom fit to my gun. Don
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  10. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Well, I wouldn't mind borrowing Bertha Jo for a few weeks, or months if you don't mind loaning her out!! :D

    I hear you on hand sewing.
    Main reason I had to give up knife making and leather work, except for my own use.

    By the time I would finish a knife and sheath, or holster, my hands would hurt for a week.

    rc
     
  11. shafter

    shafter Member

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    Very nice holster.
     
  12. roscoe

    roscoe Member

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    Nice holsters. Good luck on the spine. I had four major surgeries before I was repaired enough. Hang in there!
     
  13. BSA1

    BSA1 Member

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    O.P.,

    It looks nice and well. The rivets on the edge are a nice touch.

    However I dislike the rivet in the middle of the belt loop on the back of the holster. I do not want any metal wear it can potentially wear on the gun. With the double stitching a rivet isn't needed anyway.

    I like full flaps for semi-autos but prefer half-flap for revolvers. Half-flap will cover the hammer and the back of the cylinder. This is especially nice with cap and ball revolvers as it protects the caps and cylinder from water while leaving the grip accessable.
     
  14. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    Thanks for the comments. The rivets are of course for reinforcement and I chose solid copper for the softness, non-ferrous nature and historic accuracy. My research suggests that the same assembly method and materials were used in the 1800's by many makers, which is what I strive for in what I craft. I do suppose though that the center rivet could be eliminated with little adverse effect. The double stitching I almost always use is indeed very strong. When I begin crafting lined holsters, a rivet will of course not be exposed inside. I appreciate you comments. This helps me craft a better item. Don Sterchi
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2016
  15. dogrunner

    dogrunner Member

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    Nice work and nicely finished.

    Picky critter that I've become tho I'll offer you one suggestion.....get one of the convex rivet setters for the backside of those things.......I use the same item on my dog collars and it really makes a difference in appearance, smoother too..............I have no doubt tho that both are equally strong.

    Do you have a web site?
     
  16. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    Dogrunner thank you for the comments. I do not yet have a website, but will shortly open an Etsy store Much less expensive for a small time crafter like me.
    I appreciate the suggestion about the rivet setter. Actually I do use a concave setter but it leaves the rivet end too prominent for my applications. So I use the setter first, then a ball pein hammer to hammer tap the end flatter and lower. I rather like the hammer finished appearance of the rivet end, which helps set it apart from machine finished versions. Thank you again. Don Sterchi
     
  17. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Tallbald

    Nice looking holster for your Single Six (and I love the rounded grip frame and lanyard ring on it). The belt and holster for your SP101 are also first rate. Keep up the great work!
     
  18. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    +1000 on the full flap holster!

    This is my preferred method of field hand gun carry.

    Great job!
     
  19. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    Thank you all so much for the compliments. I found recently that I had compression fractures of my lumbar spine (degenerative disc disease) and had had to avoid Bertha Jo, my leather sewing machine because of limitations. Baby steps in returning to my craft, but steps nonetheless. I've even started an Etsy storefront page for my crafts! Don Sterchi
     
  20. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    Those are great! I am still hand sewing and I envy your machine.
     
  21. Tallbald

    Tallbald Member

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    Dr. Rob thank you. Actually, it was a long journey to finally buy a leather sewing machine for me. Don't laugh, but my loving wife Penny and I used to "accumulate" vintage Singer sewing machines and I have even make a quilt or two. Simple 9 patch ones, but I used our hand cranked Singer 201 to make them. When I moved to the coast to serve my first apprenticeship in 1976 I took a gifted Singer Featherweight 221 and made side money patching other apprentices jeans (remember patched jeans LOL). I love sewing machines.
    Anyway, I have arthritis and a spinal injury. Two spine surgeries in 2012, but basically my lumbar discs are falling to pieces and I need a total lumbar spine fusion when the deterioration is finished. I began crafting leather in 2012, hand stitching everything. Made a few stitching ponies and a stitching horse, did OK for a while, but the time I could spend using my hands and sitting was diminishing rapidly. I had already lost my job because of time off after the surgeries and very extensive physical activity restrictions imposed by the surgeons and my family MD.
    I've always been a frugal man (child of the 1970's recession, parents lost home etc) and it took my family's strong urging to buy a leather sewing machine. My wife and children actually pushed very hard for me to take 401K money ad buy one. I don't have expensive hobbies and I finally relented. Researched heavily and finally found a wonderful dealer in Toledo Ohio, Bob Kovar of Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines. He had been recommended to me also by another forum member. Bertha Jo is I believe, like so many other things nowadays, imported old technology. I could run her by a line shaft drive if needed. Bought Bertha Jo and had her shipped to me in Bowling Green KY.. She was fairly easy to learn on and is a wonderful machine. And she has allowed me to continue crafting in leather as I truly love. Even the very short sessions I can sit and use my hands are very productive times. I'm very grateful for my blessings.
    Oh. I did start an Etsy page recently to showcase what I craft. I hope it's OK to say here that it's Etsy store: www.etsy.com/shop/DonSterchiLeather. If this is not OK please just delete the store name.
    I do want to encourage others in my situation though to not "give up" when faced with challenges like mine. Work with your doctors and therapists to find something you can do while sticking with activity restrictions. leather crafting is my 'thing" now along with range time. No longer able to hike and hunt, I still get to enjoy some time outside. And my leather crafting makes me feel productive. Thanks again. Don
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2016
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